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Comparing premium transcon flights in the age of coronavirus

June 09, 2020
8 min read
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If you're after the best domestic flight experience, then you're going to want to fly between New York and Los Angeles (LAX) or San Francisco (SFO).

That's because all the major U.S. carriers offer their top products on these lucrative — and competitive — routes. Passengers sitting in biz (and even in first on American Airlines) will be treated to an exclusive ground experience, lie-flat seats, multi-course meals and more.

Before the coronavirus came stateside, I'd written a guide to choosing between American's Flagship First, JetBlue Mint and United Polaris. But now that inflight service protocols have been modified to promote safety and social distancing, let's take a look at how the premium transcon experience differs in the age of the coronavirus. This time, I'll also add in Delta One to the mix, although it was left out of the guide to the best transcon experience since its seat isn't as up-to-date or private as the other three. And don't forget to pack your mask, since you'll be required to wear one throughout your journey.

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Ground experience

On a typical domestic flight, you won't be entitled to lounge access when flying in biz. However, the airlines make an exception for premium transcon flyers.

American Airlines

Across the board, American offers the best transcon ground experience since passengers can use the Flagship Lounge, which is typically reserved for international biz flyers. Flagship Lounges offer refined dining options, an expanded bar and nicer seating options than the regular Admirals Club.

American Flagship Lounge LAX (Photo by Zach Griff/The Points Guy)

However, due to the coronavirus, all Flagship Lounges are currently closed indefinitely. American says it doesn't plan to reopen the lounges until there's sufficient demand. In the meantime, Flagship Business and First flyers will be able to access the regular Admirals Club at JFK, LAX and SFO. The LAX location in Terminal 4 is currently open, and the JFK outpost reopens on June 22. There's no date yet for when the SFO outpost will reopen.

Related: Is American Flagship First worth it?

Delta

Delta doesn't (yet) offer a lounge dedicated solely to business-class passengers. For now, all transcon Delta One passengers can access the Sky Club. The JFK and LAX lounges are open, but the SFO location is still closed with no updated reopening date.

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JetBlue

Unlike the big three U.S. carriers, JetBlue doesn't operate any airport lounges. Flyers in Mint, its business class, have access to a dedicated check-in area at JFK's Terminal 5, but there's hardly a reason to get to the airport early when flying Mint since there's no lounge to use. As such, the Mint ground experience is unchanged.

JetBlue Mint check-in (Photo by Zach Griff/The Points Guy)

United

United's premium transcon service doesn't include access to the Polaris Lounge. Instead, flyers can use the regular United Club. While there are clubs open at both LAX and SFO, the Newark (EWR) club is only open for customer service issues (no food or beverage service).

Related: Which airline lounges in the US are currently open?

Cabin and seat

Because of the coronavirus, airlines have accelerated the retirement of many aircraft types. Additionally, we've seen some carriers remove their premium transcon jets in favor of more fuel-efficient ones.

American Airlines

American suspended its transcon routes between JFK and LAX and SFO for a short period when passenger traffic was at its lowest point during the outbreak. Fortunately, the carrier is once again seeing demand for these flights, so it brought back its swanky Airbus A321T to the routes. These 102-seater jets are configured in three cabins: first, business and coach.

American Flagship First on the A321T (Photo by Zach Griff/The Points Guy)

Delta

Delta's operating a mix of Boeing 757 and 767 aircraft on the transcon routes. These planes all feature lie-flat Delta One seats, but the 767 offers a more private and spacious product.

Delta 767 (Photo by Daniel Ross/The Points Guy)

The Delta 757 is outfitted with the Collins Aerospace Diamond business-class product, which is arranged in a 2-2 configuration. On the other hand, Delta's 767 sports the Thomson Vantage biz product, arranged in a 1-2-1 configuration. As such, each passenger gets direct aisle access, so if faced with the choice, I'd definitely recommend choosing flights operated by the 767.

Related: How to fly Delta's best business class seats domestically

JetBlue

JetBlue offers Mint on just one aircraft type, the Airbus A321. You'll find 16 lie-flat seats arranged in an alternating 2-2, 1-1 configuration. The Mint Suite in the 1-1 rows is definitely the way to go, since it has a sliding door and added space to help maximize your social distancing. You'll find Suites in rows 2 and 4.

JetBlue Mint Suite (Photo by Zach Griff/The Points Guy)

United

United didn't stop flying between the coasts during the coronavirus pandemic, but it did make the experience much less comfortable. It substituted lie-flat-equipped jets with 737s that sported recliners up front.

United Polaris on the 787-10 (Photo by Zach Griff/The Points Guy)

Fortunately, those days are over, and United's back to offering service on a mix of the Boeing 757, 767 and 787-10 Dreamliner. If you get the choice, the 787-10 Dreamliner offers the most private Polaris experience, since it has the "new" seats. Some 767s do too, but it's not a guarantee like it is on the 787-10. Finally, I'd avoid the 757 is possible. Like Delta, the 757 is equipped with the Collins Aerospace Diamond business-class product, arranged in a 2-2 configuration.

Amenities and IFE

Though airlines have updated their service protocols, most of the amenities and IFE remain unchanged.

American Airlines

There aren't any changes to report for American's Flagship amenities. Customers will still receive Casper bedding, as well as amenity kits.

Delta

Delta continues to offer Westin heavenly bedding and Tumi branded amenity kits on its flights.

JetBlue

JetBlue continues to offer a pillow and blanket, and Hayward and Hopper amenity kit. To decrease touchpoints, Mint customers will receive a pair of complimentary earbuds rather than shared headphones.

(Photo by Zach Griff/The Points Guy)

United

United Polaris customers will receive Saks branded bedding, as well as amenity kits. The headphones remain unchanged.

Food and beverage

Aside from the ground experience, the food and beverage offerings are the most heavily modified in light of the health and safety precautions implemented due to the coronavirus. Across the board, we're seeing the elimination of the pre-departure beverage, though the details of the food and beverage service differ across the airlines.

American Airlines

The meal options remain unchanged — you'll still have a choice of warm entree. However, it's all going to be served on one tray, so you can (temporarily) say goodbye to multi-course meals. Regular alcohol service is still available.

Delta

You might want to pack your own food and drinks if you're flying with Delta. The carrier has suspended the traditional meal service for those flying domestically in Delta One. Instead, you'll be served a packaged Flight Fuel snack box. Your sole drink option is an individual 8.5-ounce bottle of water (you can get more than one). Note that there's no alcohol, plastic cups or ice available.

JetBlue

Like Delta, JetBlue is also abandoning hot food service in Mint. Instead, you'll be served a selection of fresh fare from the EatUp Café menu, which includes options like a turkey and pepper jack sandwich and a jicama and grape salad shaker.

Beverage service is limited to a selection of water, red and white wine and beer, which will be served in single-use cups instead of glassware. In addition, the self-service Pantry will be unavailable.

United

United Polaris customers will still be served a hot meal, but it'll all come packaged on one tray. There will be a packaged snack service before arrival too. Sadly, the ice cream sundae trolley is temporarily suspended.

(Photo by Brian Kelly/The Points Guy)

All beverages will be served sealed, and there won't be any ice, coffee, tea or poured alcohol. Instead, there will be canned beer and bottled individual wines on offer.

Related: The buffet is closed: How coronavirus forever changed a longtime travel luxury

Bottom line

The transcon flight experience will look a lot different as travel begins to slowly rebound. Though the hard product isn't changing, many elements of the service, especially the food and beverage options, are going to be quite limited.

Delta and JetBlue have totally suspended hot meal service. American and United still offer hot entree choices, but American's got the broadest offering since it still offers the alcohol service.

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  • You must spend the $300 travel credit before earning 3x points for travel and dining
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  • Earn 80,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $1,200 toward travel when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®
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  • Earn 5x total points on flights and 10x total points on hotels and car rentals when you purchase travel through Chase Ultimate Rewards® immediately after the first $300 is spent on travel purchases annually. Earn 3x points on other travel and dining & 1 point per $1 spent on all other purchases
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TPG Editor‘s Rating
Card Rating is based on the opinion of TPG‘s editors and is not influenced by the card issuer.
4 / 5
Go to review

Rewards Rate

10xEarn 10x total points on hotels and car rentals when you purchase travel through Chase Ultimate Rewards®.
5xEarn 5x total points on flights through Chase Ultimate Rewards®.
3xEarn 3x points on other travel and dining.
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  • Intro Offer
    Earn 80,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $1,200 toward travel when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®

    80,000 bonus points
  • Annual Fee

    $550
  • Recommended Credit
    Credit ranges are a variation of FICO© Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.

    740-850
    Excellent

Why We Chose It

If you are looking to take your premium rewards to the highest level, this card is really a no brainer in our eyes. Chase's Ultimate Rewards make points easy to redeem, with a wide range of 10 airline and three hotel transfer partners and a friendly user interface. Despite the high annual fee, Chase is consistently adding new benefits to keep the card competitive in a fierce premium rewards field.

Pros

  • $300 annual travel credit as reimbursement for travel purchases charged to your card each account anniversary year
  • Access to Chase Ultimate Rewards hotel and airline travel partners
  • Unlimited 3x points on the broad category of travel and dining
  • 50% more value when you redeem your points for travel through Chase Ultimate Rewards®
  • Broad definitions for travel and dining bonus categories

Cons

  • Steep $550 annual fee
  • May not make sense for people that don't travel frequently
  • You must spend the $300 travel credit before earning 3x points for travel and dining
  • No automatic hotel elite status
  • Earn 80,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $1,200 toward travel when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®
  • $300 Annual Travel Credit as reimbursement for travel purchases charged to your card each account anniversary year.
  • Earn 5x total points on flights and 10x total points on hotels and car rentals when you purchase travel through Chase Ultimate Rewards® immediately after the first $300 is spent on travel purchases annually. Earn 3x points on other travel and dining & 1 point per $1 spent on all other purchases
  • Get 50% more value when you redeem your points for travel through Chase Ultimate Rewards®. For example, 80,000 points are worth $1,200 toward travel
  • 1:1 point transfer to leading airline and hotel loyalty programs
  • Access to 1,300+ airport lounges worldwide after an easy, one-time enrollment in Priority Pass™ Select and up to $100 application fee credit every four years for Global Entry, NEXUS, or TSA PreCheck®
  • Count on Trip Cancellation/Interruption Insurance, Auto Rental Collision Damage Waiver, Lost Luggage Insurance and more