Reopening Europe: When can you visit again? A country-by-country guide

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Editor’s note: This story was updated on May 12, 2021 with new information on reopenings. It was originally published June 5, 2020.


 

At The Points Guy, we’re not recommending a rush back to international travel right now in light of continuing case surges in several regions around the globe and the CDC’s latest cautionary guidance—especially for travelers who aren’t yet fully vaccinated—but we are encouraging folks to think about where they want to go once it’s safe to travel abroad again, hopefully by this summer.

In fact, late on Sunday April 25, 2021, the New York Times reported the E.U. is planning to reopen to fully-vaccinated American tourists this summer. While details remain hazy at best, there are encouraging signs.

If you want to find out where U.S. travelers can go right now, follow this link for our complete guide to which countries are allowing U.S. travelers.
In the meantime, this guide summarizes each European country’s current status for international travel.

In This Post

 Albania

Krujë, Albania. (Photo by Westend61/Getty Images)
Krujë, Albania. (Photo by Westend61/Getty Images)

The Albanian government lifted all restrictions on tourism on July 1, 2020 and commercial flights have resumed, but some connections through major European hubs were reduced in December 2020.

Americans can visit, according to the U.S. Embassy in Albania, but the U.S. State Department’s travel advisory for Albania is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

There are no testing requirements for visitors, but temperature checks on arriving passengers at the airport and wearing a mask in all public spaces are mandatory. If a passenger has COVID-19 symptoms and/or a fever they may be required to undergo a mandatory government quarantine. The U.S. Embassy also notes that travelers should be prepared for travel restrictions to be put into effect with little or no advance notice.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone aged two and older traveling to the U.S. from Albania must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

Albania has an 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew until further notice and all bars, restaurants and fast food outlets can offer delivery only during those hours.

Armenia

Armenia has reopened its borders to Americans, according to the U.S. Embassy in Armenia. All visitors are now required to present a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken with 72 hours of arrival or submit to a test in the public area of the arrivals hall of Zvartnots International Airport and self-isolate until receiving the result. Masks are mandated in all public spaces and on public transportation.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Armenia must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s travel advisory for Armenia is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Austria

Vienna, Austria September 2017. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Vienna, Austria September 2017. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Tourism has been shut down in Austria, but the reopening of the hospitality sector is expected on May 19, 2021—although solely for E.U. travelers. Until then, only Austrian and E.U. citizens, along with those from countries deemed “safe,” are allowed to enter Austria, and only for essential business.

Austria entered a second lockdown in November 2020. As of March 14, 2021, stay-at-home restrictions are mandated for the national curfew hours of 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. Many hotels are closed as restrictions have also limited hotel occupancy to essential business travelers, closed bars and restaurants to all but take-out dining and canceled cultural events. These restrictions are expected to be eased as of May 19, 2021. Shops and museums reopened in Vienna and Lower Austria on May 3, 2021 after a hard lockdown.

The country also now requires that medical-grade face masks (FFP2 or N95) be worn on public transportation and in all shops, museums and businesses. For details on travel restrictions, check here.

As of Jan. 15, 2021, all travelers entering Austria must register electronically for a pre-travel clearance. The Austrian government also now requires a negative COVID-19 PCR (taken within 72 hours of arrival) or rapid Antigen test (taken within 48 hours of arrival), which applies to third-party nationals who are allowed to enter Austria right now. This could include narrow exceptions for American travelers coming from within the Schengen area for “essential business,” according to the U.S Embassy in Austria. The test must be written in German or English and dated within 72 hours of the travel departure date.

All arrivals are also required to commit to a 10-day self-quarantine. Taking a second PCR test five days after arrival and receiving a negative result will end the quarantine.

Travelers from “safe countries” (as of May 11, 2021, they are Australia, Finland, Iceland, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea and the Vatican) do not need to present a test result or self-quarantine, but do need to obtain pre-travel clearance.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Austria must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Austria is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Azerbaijan

According to the U.S. Embassy in Azerbaijan, U.S. citizens with legal residence status in Azerbaijan are allowed to enter, but only by air. Other Americans are currently not welcome. All travelers must have a negative COVID-19 test issued within 48 hours of arrival and everyone is subject to a 14-day self-quarantine. The country is under special quarantine restrictions through June 1, 2021. Restaurants. cafes and most other businesses are open, but all shopping malls remain closed.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Azerbaijan must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Azerbaijan is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Belarus

Belarus has been in the middle of a popular uprising against the man called the “last dictator in Europe,” the U.S. State Department’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19, so it may not be the best time to visit—but the country bordering Russia is open to tourism. According to the U.S. Embassy in Belarus, Americans are on a list of countries that were allowed to enter as of Aug. 15, 2020, but only through Minsk National Airport. Land borders are closed to American travelers.

If you can find a flight, you’ll need to get a visa. A COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours is required and travelers from a “red-zone” country (which includes the U.S.) must self-quarantine for 10 days—and complete the full quarantine in Belarus. You’ll also need to fill out a health questionnaire and submit to temperature/health checks on arrival.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Belarus must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

Belgium

Brussels, Belgium March 2015. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Brussels, Belgium March 2015. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Belgium is not allowing American tourists, according to the U.S. Embassy in Belgium. The country, which has been hard hit by COVID-19, had been under a severe lockdown and restrictions remain.

On Jan. 25, 2021, Belgium banned all leisure/tourism travel for its own citizens and residents and severely restricted entry to just travelers entering the country for approved essential business, family or humanitarian purposes through April 18, 2021. Currently, travel to Belgium by Belgian/EU/Schengen citizens or long-term residents is permitted, but is discouraged. For all other citizens, travel for non-essential purposes remains prohibited. See details here.

Travelers who are permitted to enter must complete a passenger locator form at least 48 hours prior to arrival and if traveling from a “red zone” (currently the U.S. and many other countries) present a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of departure. Those considered “high-risk” based on their passenger locator form answers will receive a QR code via text message for testing and must quarantine upon arrival and test on day 7.

Belgium has also instituted social distancing restrictions that remain in place, including outdoor terrace dining or take-out only services at restaurants. For more information, check the country’s Current Measures updates.

As of Jan. 26, 2021 everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Belgium must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Belgium is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory is Level 4: Very High Levels of COVID-19.

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Bosnia and Herzegovina reopened to international travelers on Sept. 13, 2020, and Americans can visit, although the U.S. Embassy in Bosnia and Herzegovina continues to report that the country is currently experiencing a high number of COVID-19 cases.

A negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 48 hours of arrival is required to enter. According to the U.S. Embassy, requirements and restrictions may change with little or no advance notice.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Bosnia and Herzegovina must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Bosnia and Herzegovina is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Levels of COVID-19.

Bulgaria

Sofia, Bulgaria September 2017. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Sofia, Bulgaria September 2017. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

U.S. citizens are once again allowed to enter the country as of May 1, 2021, according to the U.S. Embassy in Bulgaria, but only under certain conditions.

Travelers currently allowed to enter are Bulgarian nationals, permanent residents and their family members; citizens of the European Union, the Schengen Agreement States (including San Marino, Andorra, Monaco and Vatican City); citizens of the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland, Australia, Canada, the United States, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, the Republic of Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, the United Arab Emirates, Ukraine, North Macedonia, Serbia, Albania, Kosovo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Moldova, Israel, Kuwait, the Republic of Belarus, and Turkey.

To enter Bulgaria, a person from the above countries must present one of the following:

  • a vaccination certificate for a completed vaccination course against COVID-19; the vaccination certificate is considered valid 14 days after receiving the final dose and must include the full name of the vaccinated person as per the identification document, date of birth, dates the doses were administered, vaccine name and batch number, name of the producer, details of the vaccine certificate issuing authority and country
  • a positive result from a PCR or antigen test for immunity for COVID-19 for persons who had the infection not more than 6 months from the date they enter the country
  • a negative result from a PCR test performed within 72 hours of their entry into Bulgaria or a negative antigen test performed within 48 hours of their entry into the country

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Bulgaria must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Bulgaria is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Croatia

Zagreb, Croatia. (Photo by Iascic/Getty Images)
Zagreb, Croatia. (Photo by Iascic/Getty Images)

U.S. travelers can once again visit Croatia—but they must have proof of accommodation paid in full in advance of arrival. Croatia had reopened for tourists from all countries, but then on Dec. 1, 2020, the government restricted entry and border crossings and instituted varying levels of lockdown to help limit COVID-19 transmission, and as a result, entry for tourism purposes was not permitted for U.S. citizens. That changed as of April 1, 2021.

According to the U.S. Embassy in Croatia, U.S. tourists must fill out the Enter Croatia form and present one of the following:

  • a negative result of a COVID-19 PCR or rapid Antigen test taken less than 48 hours before arrival; those who provide a rapid Antigen test result and are staying in Croatia longer than 10 days must repeat the test within 10 days of the original test.
  • a vaccination certificate showing vaccination was completed at least 14 days before entry to Croatia
  • a certificate confirming recovery from a COVID-19 infection with a positive test result having been received within 11 and 180 days of arrival in Croatia

Unvaccinated travelers can also test upon arrival (at the traveler’s cost) and self-isolate until receiving a negative result. All travelers visiting for tourism purposes must also provide proof of accommodation paid in advance in full or they will not be permitted to enter the country. Those who own houses or vessels in Croatia are permitted to enter.

The U.S. Embassy also notes that entry requirements are subject to change at any time without notice and that the Croatian Border Police have final authority regarding entry into Croatia.

Related: Croatia now allowing travelers to skip testing, isolation if they’re vaccinated

Incoming travelers from the EU and Schengen Area “Green List” countries and those from limited other countries on the EU safe list can enter without producing a negative COVID-19 PCR test; EU and Schengen Area residents from countries not on the list must provide proof of vaccination, recovery from previous infection or a negative PCR test result taken within 48 hours of arrival or take a test upon arrival (at their own expense) and self-isolate under receiving the results.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Croatia must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

Croatia requires that masks be worn in indoor public spaces and outdoors when social distancing can not be maintained. Current restrictions also mandate outdoor dining or take-out and delivery only by restaurants and bars.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Croatia is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Cyprus

Cyprus, a small island nation off the coast of Turkey, is now open to Americans arriving directly from the United States.

According to the U.S. Embassy in Cyprus, as of April 1, 2021 “the the United States is classified as a ‘Red’ category country. Tourists may travel from the United States to the Republic of Cyprus without mandatory self-isolation provided they have uploaded proof of a negative PCR test within 72 hours of boarding a flight to Cyprus, complete another test upon arrival at their own expense (30 euros), and have an approved Cyprus Flight Pass.” Children under the age of 12 do not require testing. For details on travel requirements, check here.

The U.S. Embassy also notes that vaccinated passengers who have a valid vaccination certificate from certain countries (including the United States) can travel to the Republic of Cyprus from any country without having to meet the prerequisites of the “country category” they are traveling from. U.S. citizen travelers from the United States can upload proof of vaccinations to Cyprus Flight Pass. Vaccinated travelers, however, can still be selected for random COVID-19 testing on arrival.

There is a 9 p.m. daily curfew in place and face coverings are required in all public spaces for people age 12 and older. Restaurants are open for outdoor service only.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Cyprus must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The CDC has issued a Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19 advisory for Cyprus, while the U.S. State Department’s advisory is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Czech Republic

The Prague Christmas Market. (Photo by Frank Chmura/Getty Images)
The Prague Christmas Market. (Photo by Frank Chmura/Getty Images)

The Czech Republic, which in early and mid-March 2021 experienced the fastest virus spread in Europe, was under an emergency lockdown through April 12, 2021. According to the U.S. Embassy in the Czech Republic, Americans were not welcome even before the country began banning all travelers, including those in the E.U. and Schengen zones, from visiting for tourism purposes.

The latest updates on restrictions, which now include wearing FFP2 masks (equivalent to N95 masks) or two surgical masks in public spaces such as buses, trains and shops, can be found here.

Only returning citizens or permanent residents and those coming to the country for essential reasons will be allowed in. Those from orange (medium-risk), red (high-risk), dark red (very high-risk) and dark gray (extremely high-risk) countries must show a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours (or an Antigen test taken with 24 hours) and test again after five days in the country, and only those from orange countries are not required to test upon arrival and self-isolate until receiving the day 5 test results. For details, check here.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from the Czech Republic must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for the Czech Republic is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Denmark

Copenhagen October 2015. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Copenhagen October 2015. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Denmark is not open to Americans. According to the U.S. Embassy in Denmark, the Danish border closure—imposed on March 14, 2020—remains in place for tourism-related travel from the United States. Only Danish citizens or permanent residents or those traveling to Denmark for a “worthy purpose” may travel from the U.S. and they must follow the requirements for non-vaccinated travelers from “orange” and “red” E.U. countries, as listed below.

As of May 1, 2021, fully vaccinated travelers (14 days past completing vaccination with an E.U.-apprved vaccine) visiting from “yellow” or “orange” E.U. and Schengen countries no longer need to present a negative test, have a “worthy purpose” for their visit, test upon arrival or isolate.

Non-vaccinated travelers from “yellow” E.U. countries can visit Denmark without having a “worthy purpose,” but must present a negative COVID-19 test taken within 48 hours of travel and take a rapid Antigen test upon entry.

Non-vaccinated travelers from “orange” and “red” E.U. countries can only visit Denmark for a “worthy purpose,” and must present a negative COVID-19 test taken within 48 hours of travel, take a rapid Antigen test upon entry and isolate for 10 days (which can end after a negative PCR test on day 4).

Entry rules for Denmark can be found here.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Denmark must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The government of Denmark implemented national lockdown restrictions in 38 municipalities, including Copenhagen, which remained in place through April 5, 2021, with a gradual easing every two weeks with the goal of opening fully by the end of May 2021 when all over-50 residents are expected to be vaccinated.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Denmark is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Estonia

Tallinn, Estonia May 2019. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Tallinn, Estonia May 2019. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Estonia is closed to Americans, according to the U.S. Embassy in Estonia. It is open to passengers arriving from other countries in the European Union and the Schengen Zone—although those from countries with high infection rates (currently many E.U. countries) are required to present a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours or test upon arrival, which allows them to shorten a required 10-day quarantine with another test taken on day 6 after arrival. Permitted travelers who have proof of being within six months of being fully vaccinated or having recovered from COVID-19 can enter without having to quarantine. All travelers are required to complete an online declaration of health up to 72 hours prior to arrival. See information here.

Estonia entered a lockdown on March 11, 2021 to try to stem rising cases. The order has been eased with shops and museums allowed to reopen at 25% capacity, while restaurants can operate for outdoor dining or takeout and delivery.

Estonia is also open to residents of Australia, New Zealand, South Korea, Rwanda, Thailand and Singapore.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Estonia must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Estonia is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Finland

Helsinki, Finland August 2019. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Helsinki, Finland August 2019. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Finland is closed to Americans. The country uses a traffic light model to determine on a weekly basis who is allowed to enter, with testing and quarantine required. Finland is restricting entry from all Schengen countries except Iceland to only those traveling for essential purposes through at least May 25, 2021.

Citizens of countries considered low-risk (currently Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore and Thailand) are allowed to visit, will be tested upon entry and do not need to quarantine. Those from high-risk countries traveling for essential purposes, even those who are fully vaccinated, must undergo a health check and COVID-19 test upon arrival arrival and self-isolate for 14 days, with quarantine allowed to end following a negative test no less than 72 hours after arrival. For the latest restrictions, check here.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone aged two and older traveling to the U.S. from Finland must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Finland in Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

France

Paris, France 2015. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Paris, France 2015. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Since Jan. 31, 2021, France has banned all but essential travel by anyone outside of the European Union and Schengen zone countries. The country has lifted a ban for travelers from the United Kingdom, Australia, Japan, Israel, New Zealand, Singapore and South Korea. Any traveler from the United States must show they are an essential traveler with a compelling reason to enter and must obtain a “travel attestation” from the Ministry of Interior website. Like all essential travelers arriving from E.U. or Schengen countries (except cross-border commuters), they must also present a negative COVID-19 PCR taken within 72 hours of arrival and self-isolate for seven days before taking another test.

France, which has been hit hard by the coronavirus, extended lockdown measures and restrictions to all regions on April 3, 2021, with all non-essential services closed. There is currently a nationwide curfew from 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. and restaurants, cafes, bars, museums and other venues are closed. But France’s government recently announced a gradual reopening plan with some shops reopened on May 3, 2021 and museums, restaurant terraces and other venues set to reopen in the weeks that follow. The curfew will initially remain in place at 7 p.m. Details are available here.

The U.S. Embassy & Consulates in France reports that the president of France has laid out a reopening plan that would allow “foreign tourists” with a health pass (tied to being fully vaccinated or having a negative COVID-19 PCR test) to enter France beginning June 9, 2021 if COVID-19 levels remain under control. It is not yet known if U.S. travelers will be included among the foreign tourists allowed to enter. The embassy also notes that if the health situation permits, the Government of France has announced that on May 19, 2021, cafés, bars, and restaurants will be allowed to reopen their outdoor terraces, non-essential shops can reopen, and the curfew will move to 9 p.m.

France is also now requiring that everyone in public spaces wear medical-grade face masks (FFP1 or more protective FFP2 filtering respirators) or fabric masks that meet “Category 1” specifications by blocking more than 90% of particles.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from France must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for France is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Georgia

Americans are now welcome in the country of Georgia, according to the U.S. Embassy, including those who have documented proof of two COVID-19 vaccinations and those willing to stay for six months and work from home in the country. However, the U.S. State Department’s current advisory for Georgia is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19. There is also a nationwide curfew from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.

Unvaccinated U.S. citizens or residents arriving by air through permitted countries are required to complete an application form, present a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of travel and take a second PCR test (at their own expense) on the third day after arrival in Georgia. Vaccinated U.S. citizens only need to present their vaccine certificate. Details and links to requirements are available on the U.S. Embassy website.

Related: Work from home in these countries

Georgia had hoped to attract freelancers and self-employed foreigners. Those interested in applying can expect to provide personal information, a certificate of employment and proof of travel insurance (valid for six months). Travelers must submit the application and obtain relevant confirmation documents prior to arriving in Georgia.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Georgia must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

Germany

Berlin August 2019. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Berlin August 2019. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Germany remains closed to Americans, according to the U.S. Embassy in Germany. Amid rising cases, the country entered a “hard lockdown” on Dec. 16, 2020 that was extended through May 9, 2021 with some limited easing of restrictions in regions with low cases. There is limited entry for just E.U. citizens and residents, similar to the actions taken by other E.U. nations.

On Jan. 31, 2021, the German government also announced a ban on all non-German-citizen travelers from seven “areas of variant concern” through at least May 12, 2021; non-citizen permanent residents are excluded from the ban and must provided required pre-arrival testing.

As of Jan. 1, 2021, Germany added travelers from Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea and Thailand to the list of countries approved for entry, but only if there is an urgent need for them to travel to Germany. Testing and quarantining are required for entry, depending on the traveler’s country of origin or where they have traveled in the past 14 days, with all travelers age six and older required to present a negative COVID-19 PCR or Antigen test result taken within 48 hours of arrival. The latest updates for travel can be found here. Updates on risk areas are provided by the Robert Koch Institute (RKI).

overnight hotel stays for tourism purposes have not been allowed for months, but a gradual state-by-state reopening is scheduled for later May and June. Germany now requires that all people wear FFP1 or FFP2 medical-grade face masks when on public transport, at work or in shops.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Germany must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Germany is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Greece

Athens May 2018. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Athens May 2018. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Greece began welcoming U.S. travelers on April 19, 2021 after accelerating its plans to reopen for tourism purposes, originally slated to happen on May, 14, 2021. Several cruise lines, including Celebrity, have also said they plan to sail the Greek islands from Athens beginning in late June 2021.

Tourists will be subject to the country’s remaining lockdown restrictions and an 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew. Restrictions have begun to be eased over the past few weeks, as the country’s cafes, bars and restaurants reopened for outside dining on May 3, 2021 and museums were scheduled to reopen the week of May 10, 2021.

Related: Greece to welcome back tourists on May 14, 2021

All travelers eligible to enter Greece without self-isolation—those from EU & Schengen Area countries, United States, United Kingdom, Israel, Serbia, United Arab Emirates, New Zealand, Australia, South Korea, Thailand, Rwanda, Singapore and the Russian Federation (Russian travelers must provide proof of vaccination and a negative PCR test)—should expect to adhere to Greece’s “five lines of defense” strategy. Those lines include:

  • All visitors must be fully vaccinated (14 days or more past completion) or present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival (children age five and under are exempt from testing)
  • A checking system at Greece’s airports and borders, where passengers can be selected randomly to take a rapid test
  • Any visitor who tests positive for coronavirus will be isolated in a “quarantine hotel”
  • All tourism industry workers must be vaccinated (they will move up the priority list once the most vulnerable Greek citizens get the vaccine)
  • Strict adherence to safety protocols such as wearing masks and social distancing.

All travelers must also complete an online Passenger Locator Form (PLF) at least 48 hours before their travel date. The requirement to self-isolate has been lifted for those with a negative test of proof of completed vaccination. Complete details on entry requirements can be found here.

Greece had been a rare bright spot for foreign tourists, but not for Americans, until the Greek government announced stricter measures to combat the rising number of COVID-19 cases. It began using a two-tiered system on Nov. 3, 2020 and entered a national lockdown on Nov. 7, 2020, with some minor easing of restrictions in late January 2021. But an uptick in cases in Athens throughout February delayed the city’s gradual reopening, which had been scheduled for March 2021, and lockdown measures continued into early May 2021, with only the limited reopening of some retail shops on April 5, 2021.

Check the U.S. Embassy in Greece website for additional information.

Related: Can Americans finally go to Europe?

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Greece must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Greece is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Hungary

Budapest, Hungary, October 2014. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Budapest, Hungary, October 2014. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Hungary banned foreigners entirely early in the pandemic and began lifting lockdown restrictions on its own citizens in May 2020. But last fall, the country again banned foreigners, including Americans.

According to the U.S. Embassy in Hungary, only Hungarian citizens and their relatives can enter Hungary, with a few exceptions, and all who do enter are subject to a 10-day quarantine after receiving a health screening at the border. An exception to this is if they can credibly show two negative coronavirus tests taken at least 48 hours apart and taken in Hungary (or one can be taken before arriving in Hungary from a Schengen country, the U.S. or Canada and the other after arrival).

On May 1, 2021, Hungary began easing restrictions, with most indoor hospitality venues limited to those who are vaccinated or immune after a previous infection. There is a nightly curfew beginning at 12 a.m. Hotels are currently only allowed to accept guests traveling for business purposes, not tourism (unless the guest has proof of vaccination/immunity), and restaurants have reopened for both indoor (for vaccinated or immune guests only) and outdoor dining. Shops are open with capacity restrictions. Museums, theaters, zoos and other leisure facilities have also reopened, but only to those who have proof of vaccination or immunity and their underaged family members.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Hungary must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Hungary is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Iceland

Blue Lagoon Iceland
The Blue Lagoon in Iceland (Photo by Liz Hund/The Points Guy)

Iceland is once again welcoming U.S. travelers—but only if they’ve completed their COVID-19 vaccination or can present proof of a previous infection via a positive antibody test.

Iceland had discussed welcoming back American tourists as early as June 2020, but then changed its mind and a ban on American tourists remained in effect through March 2021. TPG’s Andrew Kunesh booked a last-minute flight shortly after the ban was lifted, but before Iceland’s government decided it needed more time to ensure procedures were in place. You can read his account here.

Related: Travel to Iceland during the coronavirus pandemic—the complete guide

As of April 6, 2021, all U.S. visitors are welcome, assuming they meet one of two criteria:

  • A completed AstraZeneca, Janssen (Johnson & Johnson), Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine
  • A previous COVID-19 infection, as confirmed with a positive antibody test or positive PCR test older than 14 days

Visitors need to pre-register before travel and can present an official paper or electronic COVID-19 vaccine certificate that includes the traveler’s name, date of birth, date and location of vaccination, vaccine administered and the manufacturer and batch or lot number, as outlined on this page. Per the revised April 6, 2021 guidelines, vaccinated U.S. travelers will be required to take a test upon arrival, free of charge, through at least June 1, 2021, when the process will be reviewed. FAQs for travelers can be found here.

Travelers not meeting the vaccination or immunity criteria must be visiting from eligible countries, will need to fill out a pre-registration form and get a COVID-19 PCR test at the airport upon arrival. Then, four to five days after this initial test, they are required to get a second COVID-19 test. During that time frame between tests, travelers must self-quarantine until the results of both tests come back negative.

Related: Your guide to COVID-19 airport testing

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Iceland must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted. On April 27, 2021, Iceland banned unnecessary travel by those from “high-risk” areas.

There is an active volcanic eruption taking place on the Reykjanes Peninsula near the capital, Reykjavik, and the Blue Lagoon, a major tourist attraction, reopened after being closed through April 16, 2021.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Iceland is Level 3: Reconsider Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 3: High Level of COVID-19.

Check the U.S. Embassy in Iceland website for additional information.

Ireland

Dublin, Ireland November 2015. Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy.
Dublin, Ireland November 2015. Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy.

Ireland is technically open to Americans, but the Irish government advises against it and a lockdown that is just now being eased following a surge cases in early 2021 has made travel there complicated through at least the end of May 2021. All arrivals from the U.S. and certain other countries must also undergo a mandatory hotel quarantine for 14 days upon arrival.

On Oct. 21, 2020, Ireland decided to reinstitute lockdown, which meant the entire country had been placed on Level 5 lockdown. As of mid-May 2021, Ireland remains at Level 5 with restaurants operating on take-out and delivery only. Hotels are open, but for essential travelers only. A gradual lifting of restrictions began on April 12, 2021 and will continue through May and June, with the full reopening of hotels scheduled for June 2, 2021, dependent on case numbers.

As of Jan. 16, 2021, all arrivals from outside Ireland over the age of six are required to present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 72 hours prior to arrival and self-isolate for 14 days. As of March 26, 2021, travelers from countries listed as “designated states” (which as of April 23, 2021 includes the U.S.) are subject to a 14-day mandatory hotel quarantine, which must be pre-booked and paid for before departure for arrival. This stay can be reduced to 10 days by taking a COVID-19 PCR test on day 10 and receiving a negative result. Travelers must then finish their quarantine at home or another accommodation.

All visitors also need to fill out a Passenger Locator Form saying where they will be quarantining. There is a fine of up to $2,860 or six months in jail for arriving without the proper test result upon arrival or for not fulfilling the required quarantine. Details on the latest restrictions can be found here.

Some TPG readers have also reported in 2020 that Americans were going to Ireland, skipping quarantine and visiting other parts of Europe. Not only is that illegal, but it’s also unethical and endangers other humans. Don’t do that.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Ireland must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

For additional information, visit the U.S. Embassy in Ireland’s website.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Ireland is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Italy

Milan March 2017. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Milan March 2017. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Americans are currently not allowed to visit Italy, except for certain essential reasons, according to the U.S. Embassy in Italy. The country has been among the hardest hit in Europe and the government imposed an Easter lockdown through April 6, 2021, with some restrictions in certain regions eased since then as infections have slowed.

Italy’s Prime Minister Mario Draghi did announce on May 5, 2021 that the country will reopen to vaccinated travelers as soon as late May. The exact timing, and whether vaccinated U.S. travelers will be among the first allowed to enter, has yet to be announced

Related: Italy reopening to Americans as soon as May, but don’t book just yet

Italy has a curfew in place from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. According to the U.S. Embassy, regions in Italy are divided in a color-coded system—white (very low risk), yellow (low risk), orange (high risk) and red (very high risk)—depending on transmission rates, availability of hospital and ICU beds and other parameters. Different restrictive measures apply to each zone.

Related: Dreaming of Italy

Italy is open to some Europeans for essential travel but not tourism. Travelers from certain countries are restricted from visiting and others (divided into groups of List A, B, C, D and E) must fill out a self-declaration form and provide a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 48 hours of entering Italy. The new rules also require anyone visiting or transiting from List D and E countries (the U.S. is a List E country) to undergo an isolation period of 10 days before taking a second test. Updates on restrictions can be found here.

Rome-Ciampino Airport (CIA), Aeroporto di Firenze-Peretola (FLR) in Florence and other Italian airports are all open.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Italy must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Italy is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Kosovo

Kosovo has reopened its borders to Americans — but the U.S. Embassy in Kosovo urges citizens not to visit, the U.S. State Department’s advisory is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

All foreign citizens entering Kosovo who come from high-risk countries, according to the official list of ECDC, must provide a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of travel; those permitted to enter Kosovo without a test must self-isolate for seven days. While testing is currently not required for those traveling from the United States, the U.S. Embassy nonetheless recommends a test for all air travelers to Kosovo: “A COVID-19 test is not required when departing the U.S en route to Kosovo. However, due to quickly evolving COVID-19 testing requirements worldwide, we strongly recommend that all travelers obtain a COVID-19 test prior to air travel. Airlines, transit points, and destination countries impose a patchwork of different testing requirements and airlines have recently refused boarding to some passengers (including U.S. citizens and Kosovo residents). Airlines have the sole authority to decide who they allow to board their aircraft. Pre-travel testing can help avoid expensive and time-consuming delays or cancellations.”

Pristina International Airport is open to all travelers, according to the embassy. There is a curfew in place and intercity movement restrictions in some high-risk municipalities.

Here’s the heath advisory from the U.S. Embassy in Kosovo: “The health situation continues to deteriorate. U.S. citizens report equipment shortages and a lack of space available at local and regional hospitals. It is possible that regional and European land and/or air border restrictions could be re-imposed with little notice.”

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Kosovo must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

Latvia

Riga, Latvia August 2019. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Riga, Latvia August 2019. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Latvia, which began a gradual lifting of its state of emergency on April 7, 2021, went several months with only essential businesses open. Even now, restaurants remain limited to take-out and delivery only. The country is not currently welcoming American tourists, but has reopened to essential travel from E.U. countries as well as to non-E.U. passport holders with E.U. permanent residence permits.

According to the U.S. Embassy in Latvia, U.S. residents residing in the United States are banned from entering Latvia for non-essential travel (which includes tourism). Several exceptions exist, one of which is to enter with an E.U. passport if you have one.

Since Jan. 15, 2021, all travelers to Latvia are required to complete an electronic confirmation form no earlier than 48 hours before entering the country or possibly face a fine of up to €2,000, and everyone age 12 and over is required to present a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival. All travelers from outside the E.U./Schengen Zone must test again upon arrival at their own expense (with a positive result requiring a government quarantine). Self-isolation for 10 days is also required for anyone arriving from a country with a high number of cases.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Latvia must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Latvia is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Liechtenstein

Switzerland handles immigration and customs matters for Liechtenstein, meaning that as long as you are qualified to enter Switzerland, you are able to enter Liechtenstein. There is an open border between the two countries. Americans are not allowed in for tourism at this time, according to the U.S. Embassy. Switzerland/Liechtenstein has also banned entry from the United Kingdom and South Africa. Shops and museums in the two countries reopened on March 1, 2021, and restaurants and bars (for outdoor seating only) and some indoor cultural and leisure facilities reopened April 19, 2021.

At this time, entry to Liechtenstein (and Switzerland) is permitted for E.U. nationals and residents of other countries that are not on the list of high-risk countriesTravelers who hold those passports and are traveling to Liechtenstein for essential reasons must fill out an entry form and present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival. Travelers from non-high-risk countries (as of April 5, 2021, the U.S. is no longer considered high-risk) do not have to quarantine; travelers from high-rsk countries in the E.U. are required to self-quarantine for 10 days, with an opportunity to shorten quarantine after 7 days with testing.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Liechtenstein must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Liechtenstein is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Lithuania

Vilnius, Lithuania May 2019. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Vilnius, Lithuania May 2019. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Lithuania has reopened its borders to other E.U. members, but not to Americans. It does, however, have different entry requirements for countries depending on their COVID-19 cases (the list is here). Most travelers must complete a registrations form, present a negative COVID-19 PCR or Antigen test taken within 72 hours of departure and to self-isolate for 10 days. Lithuania entered a national lockdown that is in effect until May 31, 2021, with citizens urged to avoid non-essential travel and work from home.

U.S. passport holders and residents are not currently allowed to enter, according to the U.S. Embassy in Lithuania. The country continually updates its rules for all arrivals from abroad and details can be found here and here.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Lithuania must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Lithuania is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Luxembourg

Luxembourg November 2016.
Luxembourg November 2016. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Luxembourg currently only allows E.U. citizens, E.U. residents, and residents of certain other specific countries to enter for essential reasons only and a negative COVID-19 PCR or viral Antigen test taken within 72 hours of travel is required. Third-country nationals, which includes American travelers, are still prohibited from visiting.

More information about restrictions can be found on the U.S. Embassy in Luxembourg website. On Oct. 29, 2020, the country adopted new COVID-19 safety measures that limited gatherings, set restrictions for shops and closed restaurants (outside dining has been allowed as of April 7, 2021). An 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew and other restrictions are in effect until at least May 15, 2021.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Luxembourg must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Luxembourg is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Malta

U.S. citizens are banned from entering Malta for non-essential travel, according to the U.S. Embassy in Malta.

As of March 28, 2021, all travelers from Amber List countries can visit, but must provide a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 72 hours of boarding a flight. Residents of countries on the Red List (as the U.S. currently is) can visit, but only after having spent 14 days in a safe corridor country (such as Turkey, Greece or Croatia, where Americans can travel) and showing a negative test result taken within 72 hours of arrival in Malta. See the latest details here and check the U.S. Embassy website for the list of safe corridor countries.

According to the U.S. Embassy, non-essential shops in Malta were allowed to reopen as of April 26, 2021 and restaurants reopened on May 10, 2021 with a 5 p.m. closing time (which changes to midnight on May 24, 2021).

Tourism in Malta is scheduled to reopen on June 1, 2021, but details on whether Americans will be permitted to enter have not been announced.

Malta is a small island nation in the middle of the Mediterranean, and it began its initial reopening on May 1, 2020. At the time, the country’s Prime Minister Robert Abela said at a news conference, “I am pleased we have managed to weather the storm without having succumbed to pressure to order a total lockdown.” As you can see in the video below, the county had an advertising campaign with the tagline, “Dream Malta now, visit later.” But as of Oct. 29, 2020 the country issued new restrictions that closed bars, limited social gatherings and required face masks and temperature checks at businesses.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone aged two and older traveling to the U.S. from Malta must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Malta is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Moldova

Moldova declared a public healthcare emergency on May 15, 2020 and it has been extended until at least May 31, 2021. The country is, however, open to tourism from some countries. According to the U.S. Embassy in Moldova, Americans can now enter Moldova, but the embassy doesn’t specify if that applies to travel for tourism purposes. Travelers age five and older who do enter Moldova must present a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival (to avoid two weeks of self-isolation). Fully vaccinated travelers are now exempt from testing requirements.

As of Jan. 26,2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Moldova must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Malta is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Monaco

Monaco’s reigning monarch Prince Albert tested positive and recovered from COVID-19 in 2020 after going into self-quarantine. The tiny principality had begun to reopen to tourists, although not to Americans, but currently non-essential travel is not permitted.

France handles immigration and customs for Monaco and will allow entrance to citizens of the EU and other select nations, but all travelers must report their plans to Monaco’s health authorities and arrange for a COVID-19 PCR test taken in their country of origin within 72 hours of travel, Without a test, visitors will be required to quarantine for 14 days.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Monaco must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for France/Monaco is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory is Level 4: Very High Levels of COVID-19.

Montenegro

Montenegro is open to Americans. The U.S. Embassy in Montenegro notes that the country now requires travelers to provide one of the following: a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival; a positive antibody test not older than 30 days; a positive PCR test taken between 14 and 90 days of entry, or proof that seven days have elapsed since completing a COVID-19 vaccination (one shot or the second of two shots). However, there are heavy restrictions on intercity travel and the U.S. State Department’s advisory for Montenegro is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Face masks and social distancing requirements remain in effect for public spaces and shops, but as of May 1, 2021, restaurants, cafes and bars are open at full capacity with a maximum of four people per table, but must close by 11 p.m. .

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Montenegro must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

Netherlands

Amsterdam, Netherland (Photo by Liz Hund/The Points Guy)
Amsterdam, Netherland (Photo by Liz Hund/The Points Guy)

In November 2020, the Netherlands announced tightened measures to curb the spread of the coronavirus and then entered a tough national lockdown on Dec. 14, 2020; some restrictions have recently been eased, and shops and restaurants with outside seating areas were allowed to reopen as of April 28, 2021 and a 10 p.m. curfew was lifted.

According to the U.S. Embassy in the Netherlands, Americans are currently not allowed to visit.

On Jan. 20, 2021, the Netherlands instituted tough new testing measures that require all non-EU/EEA nationals to not only present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 72 hours of boarding a flight to the country, but also provide a negative rapid test result taken no more than 24 hours prior to departure. This caused national carrier KLM to announce it would cancel all of its long-haul flights, although the airline later said it has reached a rapid testing deal for its crew.

Those who can enter from “safe countries,” in addition to the required testing, are also required to fill in a health declaration and self-quarantine for 10 days (with a test after day 5 ending self-quarantine). The country has a “checklist” for incoming travelers and for the latest updates on who is allowed to visit, check here.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from the Netherlands must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure and fill out a health declaration before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for the Netherlands is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

North Macedonia

North Macedonia is now open to all tourists. Skopje International Airport (SKP) and Ohrid St. Paul the Apostle Airport (OHD) reopened on July 1, 2020. However, North Macedonia has mandated a 14-day quarantine for all travelers arriving from countries in Africa, as well as India and Brazil.

All arriving passengers will face temperature screening, but there are no quarantine or testing requirements for travelers beyond those arriving from the above countries, who are required to quarantine for 14 days. Check the U.S. Embassy in North Macedonia website for updates.

There are nationwide restrictions on public gatherings and social distancing as well as an 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew through at least May 15, 2021. Outdoor dining at restaurants is now allowed.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from North Macedonia must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for North Macedonia Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Norway

Å, Norway (Photo by Liz Hund/The Points Guy)
Å, Norway (Photo by Liz Hund/The Points Guy)

Norway is closed to most travelers from outside the EU, including Americans, according to the U.S. Embassy. The country’s travel ban, enacted on Jan. 29, 2021, is now extended until at least May 24, 2021 and only foreign nationals with a Norwegian residency can enter. The government also enacted strict new regulations regarding activities and capacities in effect until further notice.

All travelers to Norway over the age of 12 who are allowed to enter must now complete a registration form prior to traveling, present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 24 hours of travel and also be tested again for COVID-19 as soon as possible after arrival (usually at the airport and it must take place within one day) and enter and pay for a 10-day quarantine in a quarantine hotel (reduced to 7 days with two negative tests, one upon arrival and a PCR test no earlier than day 7).

On April 29, 2021, Norway introduced stricter testing requirements for travelers who have been outside the EEA/Schengen area. The latest updates on testing and quarantine can be found here.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Norway must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Norway is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Poland

Krakow, Poland June 2016. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Krakow, Poland June 2016. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Poland is open only to citizens or legal residents (and their spouses and children) of European Union countries, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland, Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia, and Australia who meet current exemptions.

To avoid mandatory quarantine, any traveler entering Poland from within the Schengen Zone must present a negative COVID-19 PCR or Antigen test taken at least 48 hours prior to arrival or enter a 10-day quarantine. Travelers arriving from outside the Schengen Zone must quarantine for 10 days or until they receive a negative result from a test taken within 48 hours of arrival in Poland; those who can show a certificate of vaccination against COVID-19 are exempt from quarantine.

Americans are not allowed, with the exception of U.S. citizens who have dual citizenship or fall within certain other categories. Check with the U.S. Embassy in Poland for specifics. Additional information is also available on the government of Poland’s COVID-19 website.

Poland entered a period of restrictions in late December 2020 that closed hotels to tourists, closed ski resorts and shopping malls, and limited restaurants to take-out and delivery only. Restrictions began to be eased on May 1, 2021, hotels reopened on May 8, 2021 at 50% capacity and outdoor dining will be allowed as of May 15, 2021. Face masks are mandatory in public and social distancing restrictions are required in public spaces.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Poland must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Poland is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Portugal

Portugal September 2018. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Portugal September 2018. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Portugal is still not open to most Americans, according to the U.S. Embassy in Portugal. People who reside in the E.U., including U.S. citizens who are lawful residents of E.U. member states, can visit Portugal for essential travel and must present proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR test conducted within 72 hours of departure for Portugal. Travelers also must fill out on an line form and face a health screening and those from certain countries must self-quarantine for 14 days. Details are available on the TAP Air Portugal website.

Masks are mandatory in indoor public spaces and outside when social distancing isn’t possible.

On Feb. 1, 2021, amid rising cases and spiking death rates in the country and the threat of imported cases of COVID-19 variants from abroad, Portugal implemented a lockdown and banned all non-essential international travel for its own citizens for two weeks. The general stay-at-home measures were extended, but as of April 5, 202, are being eased via a phased reopening (see the U.S. Embassy website for details). The country’s state of emergency ended on April 30, 2021 with the reopening of shops, museums, cafes and restaurants with hour and capacity restrictions. There are also regional curfews.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Portugal must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Portugal is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Related: What are travel bubbles?

Romania

Romania remains closed to most Americans. Travels who are permitted for essential business or family reasons, if traveling from a country of high epidemiological risk, are required to fill in an online questionnaire and present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 72 hours of boarding their flight and undergo a health screening upon arrival.

Without a test, travelers are required to quarantine for 14 days, per the U.S. Embassy in Romania, and some travelers face quarantine requirements depending on whether the traveler’s point of departure is in a yellow zone or green zone. Romania has lifted quarantine requirements for travelers from yellow zone countries who are able to show documented proof of completed COVID-19 vaccination.

A surge in cases in the country this spring has resulted in increased restrictions that have limited store hours and imposed a 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew, with an 8 p.m. curfew in certain regions. These restrictions are reviewed every 30 days.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Romania must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Romania is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Russia

The Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky skyline. (Image by www.tonnaja.com/Getty Images)
The Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky skyline. (Image by www.tonnaja.com/Getty Images)

Americans are not currently allowed to travel to Russia, even as the country has mostly reopened businesses and transportation after many restrictions were eased in June 2020.

Since March 18, 2020, the Government of the Russian Federation banned the entry of all foreign nationals, however on Jan. 25, 2021 Russia lifted its travel ban for Finland, Vietnam, India and Qatar. Anyone who is granted permission to enter the country, including those with valid residence permits, must provide a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival and complete a health form.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Russia must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Russia is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Serbia

According to the U.S. Embassy in Serbia, Americans can visit, but they will need to provide a negative PCR test taken within the previous 48 hours. If a U.S. citizen’s travel originates in the U.S., they can provide either a negative PCR or Antigen test.

There was unrest in Serbia in July 2020 as protests against coronavirus restrictions turned violent, but it seems to have quieted. COVID-19 cases have risen in recent weeks and face mask and social distancing measures are in place. On March 22, 2021, all shopping malls, nightclubs, cafes, restaurants and bars (except for takeout and delivery) were ordered to close, but outdoor dining has been allowed to resume. Cultural institutions and public transportation are open, but at limited capacity.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Serbia must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Serbia is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Slovakia

Slovakia has opened its borders to a few countries in Europe, but remains shut out to everyone else. That includes most Americans, per the U.S. Embassy in Slovakia. Only Americans who are immediate family members of a Slovak citizen or receive special permission from the government are permitted to enter.

All passengers age 10 and older who do not fall into a specific exemption category must fill out an electronic monitoring form and remain in home quarantine until receiving a negative result from a COVID-19 test taken on day 8. Those arriving from countries within the EU or from Iceland, Norway, Switzerland, Northern Ireland and Liechtenstein must register and quarantine for 14 days without having to test. As of April 19, 2021, those who are two weeks past being fully vaccinated or within 180 days of recovery from COVID-19—and who have been physically present only within the European Union, Norway, Iceland, Lichtenstein, Switzerland, or the United Kingdom for the prior 14 days—do not have to quarantine. Details can be found here.

The country entered a new partial lockdown in December 2020 that was in effect through Feb. 7, 2021. On Feb. 8, 2021, it adopted a new “traffic light” system using regional controls based on the number of hospitalizations and on April 19, 2021 began easing some restrictions. Slovakia also began requiring the use of FFP2 masks in all indoor spaces and on public transportation as of March 15, 2021, and as of March 20, 2021, its citizens and permanent residents are not allowed to travel outside the country for tourism, leisure or recreational purposes.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Slovakia must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Slovakia is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Slovenia

Slovenia has reportedly reopened its borders to some E.U. travelers, but it has a traffic light system of entry requirements. Travelers from countries on the red list must test, be immunized or fully recovered from COVID-19 or they face a mandatory 10-day quarantine on arrival.

The U.S. Embassy in Slovenia confirms Americans still aren’t being welcomed because of the E.U. ban on U.S. citizens, but there may be exceptions for family members of Slovenian citizens and for Americans who spend two weeks in another country not on the red list before traveling to Slovenia. Travelers from the United States who are permitted entry are subject to a 10-day quarantine unless they present a negative results from COVID-19 test taken in the E.U. no more than 48 hours prior to arrival in Slovenia.

According to the U.S. Embassy, the following are also accepted:

  • Tests performed in the U.S. by certain laboratories
  • Proof of vaccination, which means 7 days since the second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, 14 days since the first dose of Astra Zeneca or 21 days since the single-dose Johnson & Johnson
  • Proof of a prior COVID-19 infection: a certificate of a positive result of a PCR test, older than 21 days but not older than 6 months, or an E.U. doctor’s certificate that the person has recovered from Covid-19 in the past six months

Hotels in Slovenia have been permitted to reopen with a maximum of 30 occupied guest rooms. Museums and shops are open with social distancing restrictions. Restaurants with outdoor terraces are open (and indoor dining is allowed in some regions).

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Slovenia must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The State Department’s advisory for Slovenia is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Spain

Madrid June 2017. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Madrid June 2017. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Americans are not yet welcome, according to the U.S. Embassy in Spain, and the country suspended entry for travelers from the United Kingdom (except for Spanish citizens and residents). A ban on flights from Brazil and South Africa also remain in effect.

Travelers from the EU, from a country in the Schengen area, or from another country that has a reciprocal agreement with Spain for accepting travelers are allowed to enter Spain. Residents of non-European nations are being allowed to visit from Australia, China, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore and Thailand. For updates, check here.

Anyone entering Spain from a high-risk country must complete a digital health form within 48 hours of arrival in Spain and then provide a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival in Spain. Travelers will also undergo temperature checks upon arrival.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Spain must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Spain is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Sweden

Stockholm, Sweden August 2019. (Photo by Clint Henderson)
Stockholm, Sweden August 2019. (Photo by Clint Henderson)

Sweden has become well-known during the coronavirus crisis for not shutting down, instead hoping the population would develop “herd immunity” without hurting the economy or killing too many people. Unfortunately, Sweden has the highest number of deaths and cases in Scandinavia, and cases soared in December 2020 and January 2021, leading to a critical shortage of hospital beds. A third wave of infections is slowing but still ongoing as of early May 2021.

On Dec. 14, 2020, the country did enact stricter regulations pertaining to public gatherings and restaurant capacity, including that face masks be worn on public transportation. Face masks had not required and are generally not worn. Sweden also passed a law that as of Jan. 10, 2021, allows the government to use tougher emergency lockdown-type restrictions, including closing certain businesses.

All non-essential travel to Sweden for non-EU visitors has been banned through at least May 31, 2021. Testing is required as of Feb. 6, 2021, for entry for essential travel and all visitors must provide a negative COVID-19 PCR or Antigen test result taken within 48 hours of travel. Requirements also say that arriving travelers should get tested as soon as possible after arrival and again five days later.

There is no timeline set yet for when Americans will be able to visit, according to the U.S. Embassy in Sweden.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Sweden must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Sweden is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Switzerland

Lucerne, Switzerland April 2016. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Lucerne, Switzerland April 2016. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

At this time, entry to Switzerland is permitted for residents of countries in the E.U. and those around the world that are not on the list of high-risk countries. Travelers who hold those passports and are traveling to Switzerland for essential reasons from a country not deemed high-risk (the U.S. and the U.K. were removed from the high-risk list as of April 5, 2021, but travel is still restricted) must fill out an entry form and present a negative COVID-19 PCR test results taken within 72 hours of arrival. Travelers from non-high-risk countries no longer have to quarantine; all other travelers are required to self-quarantine for 10 days, with an opportunity to shorten quarantine after 7 days with testing.

Travel for tourism purposes is not allowed that this time. According to the U.S. Embassy in Switzerland, American tourists are not welcome, but exceptions may be made for business travel.

To combat rising cases in early 2021, the Swiss government put in place additional restrictions, which  have been eased in phases. Shops and museums reopened on March 1, 2021 and on April 19, 2021, restaurants and bars reopened for outdoor dining only, with a likely opening of indoor seating on May 31, 2021 if case numbers allow.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Switzerland must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Switzerland is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Levels of COVID-19.

Turkey

Istanbul, Turkey May 2018. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Istanbul, Turkey May 2018. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Turkey’s international borders are open for travelers from a number of countries, including the U.S., according to the U.S. Embassy in Turkey. However, cases have been surging in Turkey and on April 29, 2021, the country entered a nationwide lockdown through May 17, 2021, which prohibits the movements of citizens but not tourists, and limits shop hours and restricts restaurants to delivery only. Check the U.S. Embassy website for details.

Related: Turkey is open to Americans

Only passengers who are Turkish citizens and holders of residency cards or blue cards are allowed to travel to Turkey from Brazil and South Africa and they must undergo a 14-day quarantine (with testing on day 10) and any passenger who has visited India in the past 10 days will be required to quarantine for 14 days in a government-selection accommodation and get tested on day 14. Full details are on the Turkish Airlines website.

Since Dec. 30, 2020, all international travelers six years of age and older are required to have a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 72 hours of travel and submit it at airline check-in. Travelers without the required test results will not be allowed to board flights or enter the country. (But as of May 15, 2021, a PCR test will not be requested from passengers arriving to Turkey from Hong Kong, China, Taiwan, Vietnam, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Thailand, South Korea, Israel, Japan, United Kingdom, Latvia, Luxembourg, Ukraine and Estonia.) And since March 15, 2021, all travelers six years of age and older must also complete a Turkey Entrance Form within 72 hours of their flight an a printout or mobile screenshot of the completed form must be presented before boarding.

Upon arrival, travelers will be asked to fill out a passenger information form and undergo medical screenings for infection, and anyone showing symptoms upon arrival will be tested for coronavirus. Anyone who tests positive will be referred to a Turkish hospital for quarantine and treatment.

Restrictions put into place in September 2020 mandate the wearing of face masks at all times when in public. On March 1, 2021, Turkey’s government announced a four-tier system for local COVID-19 related restrictions. Provinces are now divided into 4 risk groups: low (blue), medium (yellow), high (orange), and very high (red) based on infection and vaccination rates. The country entered a lockdown on April 13, 2021 through May 17, 2021 for the period of Ramadan. Restaurants are open for delivery service only.

Travelers should note a couple of precautions unrelated to COVID-19:

  • The U.S. State Department currently advises against travel to Turkey due to concerns over COVID-19, terrorism and arbitrary detention. Travelers are strongly advised to avoid the areas bordering Iraq and Syria due to terrorist activity.
  • U.S. travelers will still need to apply for a visa before entering Turkey. You can do so via e-visa application, which takes about three minutes.

The State Department’s travelers’ checklist for Turkey can be found here.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone age two and older traveling to the U.S. from Turkey must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Turkey is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Ukraine

Per the U.S. Embassy in Ukraine’s website, U.S. citizens are currently able to enter the country. All U.S. citizens age 12 and older entering Ukraine from the U.S. or another “Red Zone” country are required to present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival.

U.S. citizens traveling to Ukraine must also demonstrate that they have medical insurance covering all expenses related to COVID-19 treatment while in Ukraine.

Ukraine is under adaptive quarantine until at least April 30, 2021, and mask-wearing is mandatory on public transportation and in indoor public spaces.

As of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone aged two and older traveling to the U.S. from Ukraine must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Ukraine is Level 4: Do Not Travel and the CDC’s advisory for the country is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

United Kingdom

London November 2016. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
London November 2016. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Americans can travel to the United Kingdom, but are strongly advised not to. Those who do visit will face pre-travel testing, a 10-day quarantine, and in most cases, additional tests on days 2 and 8. In England only, quarantine can be reduced after one negative COVID-19 PCR test taken on day 5 under its Test to Release scheme. The U.K. also now requires all arriving travelers to fill out a passenger locator form within 48 hours of travel and to present proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of departure for the U.K. Lists of red, amber (the U.S. is amber) and green countries, which dictates requirements, can be found here.

On Feb. 8, 2021, the U.K. also increased the fine for non-compliance and anyone who fails to comply will be subject to a fine of 1,000 pounds ($1,360). The government also revealed stiff fines and even jail time for those who try to circumvent the mandates or lie on their required passenger locator forms; the latter could be a 10,000 pound ($13,789) fine or 10 years in jail. Details are here.

COVID-19 infections and deaths have begun to level off in the U.K., after hitting record highs in January 2021. Lockdown measures are gradually being eased in England and Wales with some shops having reopened and restaurants and pubs permitted to open for outdoor dining on April 12, 2021; Scotland has also begun to lift its restrictions in phases. All four nations that comprise the U.K. have separate testing and quarantine requirement: England’s are here, Scotland’s are here, Northern Ireland’s are here and Wales’s are here.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his team announced on April 5, 2021 that the country will introduce a “traffic light” system for international travel beginning as early as May 17, 2021. Passengers coming from so-called “green” countries will not need to quarantine on their arrival in the U.K., but they will need to test prior to entry and on their return from travel. But on May 7, 2021, it was announced that U.S. citizens would not be among that group. This includes fully vaccinated Americans.

Related: Americans’ hopes for visiting the U.K. just hit with a major setback

Johnson also said on April 23, 2021 that hopefully all restrictions will be lifted by June 21, 2021.

The U.K. has been especially hard-hit by the coronavirus and the new restrictions are a result of the chaos that erupted in December 2020 when a more infectious COVID-19 variant was found to be widely circulating in London and southeastern England. As a result, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) issued a Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19 advisory for the U.K. The U.S. State Department’s advisory is Level 3: Reconsider Travel.

Related: State Department relaxes travel advisories for Americans visiting the U.K. and Israel

Any American citizen or resident age two and older returning from the U.K. to the U.S. must present a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of flying (now a requirement for all international travelers to the U.S., effective Jan. 26, 2021) or documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days.

The quarantine rules do not apply to international passengers transiting U.K. airports.

Visit the U.S. Embassy in the United Kingdom website for regular updates.

Related: A country-by-country guide to the Caribbean

Additional reporting by Katherine Fan, Jordyn Fields, Donna Heiderstadt and Liz Hund.

Featured image of Venice in 2018 by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy.

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