Best credit cards with no foreign transaction fees in 2020

Feb 29, 2020

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Editor’s note: This is a recurring post, regularly updated with new credit card information. 

There isn’t a whole lot in the points and miles world that everyone can agree on, whether it’s the best credit cards, the best airlines or the best airports. One thing we can agree on is that unnecessary fees are the worst — whether those fees come in the form of fuel surcharges on award flights, ATM or foreign transaction fees. It’s one thing if you’re incurring an additional cost for a valuable service, but foreign transaction fees essentially just punish travelers for doing what we love.

Many credit cards charge a foreign transaction fee of about 3%, which can knock out any potential rewards you earn. For this reason, we suggest having a few different cards that don’t charge foreign transaction fees when you travel abroad. In this guide, we’ll walk you through some of the best credit cards with no foreign transaction fees.
Although there are many cards that offer no foreign transaction fees, we’ve rounded up our 10 favorite cards for frequent travelers:

Best credit cards with no foreign transaction fees

In This Post

Comparing credit cards with no foreign transaction fees

Credit Card Welcome Bonus Bonus Value** Annual Fee
Chase Sapphire Preferred Card 60,000 points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first three months $1,200 $95
Capital One Venture Rewards Credit Card 50,000 miles after you spend $3,000 on purchases in the first three months $500 $95*
Chase Sapphire Reserve 50,000 points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first three months $1,000 $550
Wells Fargo Propel American Express® Card 20,000 points after spending $1,000 in purchases in the first three months  $200  $0
Capital One Savor Rewards Credit Card

$300 cash bonus after spending $3,000 on purchases in the first three months

$300 $95*
Bank of America Premium Rewards credit card 

50,000 points after you spend $3,000 on purchases in the first 90 days

$500 $95
The Platinum Card from American Express  60,000 points after you spend $5,000 on purchases in the first three months. Terms apply. $1,200 $550 (see rates and fees)
Alaska Airlines Visa® Signature credit card

40,000 bonus miles when you spend $2,000 on purchases in the first 90 days, plus a $100 statement credit and Alaska’s Famous Companion Fare starting at $121 ($99 plus taxes and fees)

$820 $75
Hilton Honors American Express Aspire Card

150,000 points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first three months. Terms apply.

$900 $450 (see rates and fees)
Marriott Bonvoy Boundless Credit Card

75,000 Bonus Points after you spend $3,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening.

$600 $95

*Annual fee waived the first year
**Bonus value is an estimated value calculated by TPG and not the card issuer.

The information for the Wells Fargo Propel and the Capital One Savor Cash Rewards Credit Card has been collected independently by The Points Guy. The card details on this page have not been reviewed or provided by the card issuer.

In addition to lacking foreign transaction fees, each card offers a unique combination of perks and benefits for travelers. Let’s look at the details for each of our top picks:

Best no-foreign-transaction-fee credit cards

Chase Sapphire Preferred: Best for travel insurance

(Photo by The Points Guy)

Annual fee: $95

Welcome bonus: 60,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases within the first three months (worth $1,200 according to TPG valuations).

Earning rate: 5x on Lyft purchases; 2x points on travel and dining; 1x on everything else

Why we like it: Chase Sapphire Preferred has always been one of the top choices for international travelers. Chase Ultimate Rewards points are some of the most valuable points available.

For premium rewards redemptions, you’ll find points are typically most valuable when transferred to one of Chase’s excellent airline and hotel partners — like United or Hyatt. Alternatively, points can be worth 1.25 cents each toward travel and activities booked through the Chase Ultimate Rewards Travel Portal, where you can find money-saving options for budget travel and economy flights.

Essential reading: Chase Sapphire Preferred card review 

APPLY HERE: Chase Sapphire Preferred

Capital One Venture Rewards Credit Card: Best for flat-rate earning

(Photo by The Points Guy)

Annual fee: $95, waived the first year

Welcome bonus: 50,000 miles after you spend $3,000 on purchases in the first three months (worth $500 in travel statement credits).

Bonus rewards: 2x miles per dollar on every purchase

Why we like it: This card’s simple rewards structure has made it a crowd favorite for beginner travelers who want to earn rewards on everyday expenses with their Capital One credit card. The Venture Rewards card offers fixed-value miles that you can redeem for 1 cent apiece to offset travel purchases, plus the ability to transfer miles to its 15 airline transfer partners.

You’ll even get a credit for the TSA PreCheck/Global Entry application fee every four years (up to $100), which is a rare benefit for a mid-tier card.

Essential reading: Capital One Venture Rewards card review

APPLY HERE: Capital One Venture Rewards credit card

Chase Sapphire Reserve: Best premium travel card

(Photo by Eric Helgas)

Annual fee: $550

Welcome bonus: 50,000 points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first three months (worth $1,000 according to TPG valuations).

Bonus rewards: 10x on Lyft purchases, 3x on travel (after using the $300 travel credit) and dining purchases; 1x on everything else

Why we like it: This premium travel-rewards credit card became hugely popular when it was first released in 2016 and has remained a top travel card for many TPG readers. In fact, it currently holds the title for Best Premium Card from the TPG awards in 2019.

As with the Chase Sapphire Preferred, you’ll find the most value by redeeming points through Chase’s transfer partners or through the Chase Travel Portal. The Reserve boosts the value of these awards to 1.5 cents per point.

Other benefits include an annual $300 statement credit for travel, up to $60 in annual statement credits on DoorDash (through 2022), at least one year of DashPass membership, Lyft Pink membership, up to $100 credit for your Global Entry or TSA PreCheck application fee every four years and a Priority Pass Select membership that includes guest access.

Essential reading: The Chase Sapphire Reserve credit card review

APPLY HERE: Chase Sapphire Reserve

Wells Fargo Propel American Express® Card: Best for no annual fee

Annual fee: $0

Welcome bonus: 20,000 points after you spend $1,000 in the first three months (worth $200 in travel)

Bonus rewards: 3x points on travel, dining, gas stations, rideshares, transit and popular streaming services

Why we like it: Beginners can find a ton of great value from the Wells Fargo Propel Card. With no annual fee, the card offers a solid return on a number of common spending categories. This card earns fixed-value rewards, meaning you’re getting a flat 1 cent from each point.

While this might not be a great fit for points and miles gurus that like to maximize transfer partners and get as much as possible out of each point, it’s perfect for those just getting started with rewards. You’ll be able to earn and burn points without worrying about transfer partners and award charts.

Essential reading: Wells Fargo Propel credit card review

APPLY HERE: Wells Fargo Propel American Express® Card

Capital One Savor Cash Rewards Credit Card: Best for entertainment spending

Annual fee: $95, waived the first year

Welcome bonus: $300 after you spend $3,000 on purchases in the first three months.

Bonus rewards: 4% cash back on dining and entertainment and 2% cash back at grocery stores; 1% on everything else

Why we like it: Capital One defines dining and entertainment broadly, meaning you can earn 4% cash back on a lot of different purchases — including some common expenses abroad like dining and entertainment. The bonus is solid and you’re getting a full year without having to pay an annual fee.

Although international travelers often favor points and miles, cash back is still highly valuable — especially when you’re earning a good return on a category not often covered with other credit cards (entertainment, in Savor’s case). The ability to earn such a high return without forking over a foreign transaction fee is great.

Essential reading: Capital One Savor card review 

APPLY HERE: Capital One Savor Cash Rewards credit card

Bank of America Premium Rewards credit card: Best for Bank of America customers

Annual fee: $95

Welcome bonus: 50,000 bonus points after you spend $3,000 on purchases within the first 90 days of account opening (worth $500 according to TPG valuations)

Earning rate: 2x points on travel and dining; 1.5x points on everything else

Why we like it: The Bank of America Premium Rewards card has a lot to offer for such a low annual fee — especially if you qualify for the Preferred Rewards program.

You’ll earn a flat 1.5x on every purchase plus 2x on travel and dining purchases. The card also comes with an impressive suite of benefits, including an up to $100 airline incidental credit, a Global Entry/TSA PreCheck application fee credit (up to $100) and an array of travel protections.

The rewards structure is also incredibly simple, giving you flexibility to redeem for travel, cash-back or gift cards with a variety of merchants.

For members of the Preferred Rewards program, this card becomes even more valuable. If you stash enough cash away with Bank of America, you could earn up to 3.5x on travel and dining and 2.625x on all other purchases.

Essential reading: Bank of America Premium Rewards card review

APPLY HERE: Bank of America Premium Rewards credit card

The Platinum Card from American Express: Best for luxury perks

(Photo by The Points Guy)

Annual fee: $550 (see rates and fees)

Welcome bonus: 60,000 points after you spend $5,000 on purchases in the first three months (worth $1,200 according to TPG valuations), though be sure to check the CardMatch Tool to see if you’re targeted for a higher offer.

Bonus rewards: 5x on flights booked directly with airlines and flights and prepaid hotels booked through amextravel.com

Why we like it: Not only does this card have no foreign transaction fees, but it also offers an extensive portfolio of luxury travel benefits, including an annual $200 airline fee credit, monthly Uber credits (up to $200 credit annually), reimbursement for Global Entry or TSA PreCheck application fees every four years (up to $100) and access to Delta Sky Clubs (when flying Delta), Amex CenturionPriority Pass Select, Escape and Airspace lounges. You also get Gold status with Hilton Honors and Marriott Bonvoy.

Essential reading: Amex Platinum credit card review 

APPLY HERE: The Platinum Card from American Express

Alaska Airlines Visa Signature credit card: Best for airline miles

Annual fee: $75

Welcome bonus: Limited-time offer of 40,000 bonus miles after you spend $2,000 in the first 90 days, plus a $100 statement credit and Alaska’s Famous Companion Fare starting at $121 (worth $820 according to TPG valuations).

Bonus rewards: 3x miles on Alaska Airlines purchases

Why we like it: Alaska Airlines miles are valued the highest of any airline miles in our monthly valuations and the Alaska Signature Visa credit card is one of the only ways to currently earn them.

While Alaska is a Seattle-based airline that only operates in North America, it does have strategic partnerships with other airlines that expand its reach. There are certainly some amazing sweet spots in the Mileage Plan program and the next few years should be exciting for loyal Alaska Airlines customers.

A revitalized partnership between Alaska Airline and American Airlines was recently announced and Alaska has plans to join the Oneworld airline alliance mid-2021.

Essential reading: Alaska Airlines Visa Signature credit card review

APPLY HERE: Alaska Airlines Visa Signature credit card

Hilton Honors American Express Aspire Card: Best for luxury hotel benefits

(Photo by Eric Helgas/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Eric Helgas/The Points Guy)

Annual fee: $450 (see rates and fees)

Welcome bonus: 150,000 points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first three months (worth $900 according to TPG valuations).

Bonus rewards: 14x points when you make eligible purchases at Hilton and 7x points at eligible U.S. restaurants, car rental booked directly from select rental companies and flights booked directly through the airline or on amextravel.com.

Why we like it: Although the Hilton Aspire card has a high annual fee, some travelers will be able to recoup this fee and more through the card’s benefits. These benefits include a free-weekend-night award each year, top-tier Hilton Diamond status, up to $250 in annual airline fee credits, up to $250 in annual Hilton resort statement credits and a Priority Pass Select membership.

Hilton is one of the largest hotel programs in the world, with nearly 6,000 hotels in 117 countries and properties that appeal to both budget and luxury travelers. If you frequently stay at Hilton properties throughout the year, you can get a lot of value by adding this card to your wallet.

Essential Reading: Hilton Aspire card review

APPLY HERE: Hilton Honors American Express Aspire

Marriott Bonvoy Boundless Credit Card: Best for fans of Marriott

(Photo by The Points Guy)

Annual fee: $95

Welcome bonus: Earn 75,000 Bonus Points after you spend $3,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening.  (worth $600 according to TPG valuations).

Bonus rewards: 6x points at participating Marriott Bonvoy hotels and 2x points on all other purchases

Why we like it: Marriott has encountered several issues since its merger with SPG, most recently with the automatic rebooking of award stays and the implementation of peak and off-peak award pricing. However, this card is still worth considering if you’ve remained loyal to the hotel brand and stay at Marriott properties at least a few times each year.

You’ll get a free night worth up to 35,000 points each year as well as 15 elite-night credits each year, which could help you qualify for higher status levels.

Essential reading: Marriott Bonvoy Boundless credit card review

APPLY HERE: Marriott Bonvoy Boundless Credit Card

Are foreign transaction fees affected by exchange rates?

Yes and no.

Foreign transaction fees are charged by your issuer when you make a purchase abroad (or sometimes when you make an online purchase through a foreign retailer). The exchange rate refers to the value of one currency compared to the other and that rate is determined by payment networks.

What the exchange rate is on a certain day in a certain country will not change the percentage your card charges for a foreign transaction fee. In that sense, exchange rates do not affect foreign transaction fees.

However, an exchange rate can have an effect on the actual dollar amount you are charged for a foreign transaction fee. For example, at the time of writing, the Morningstar exchange rate for the U.S. dollar to the Euro was 1:0.91. That means you’d pay a $0.66 (3%) transaction fee for a 20-Euro dinner.

However, if the exchange rate changed to, say, 1:1.33, you’d only end up paying $0.45 for a 20-euro dinner. So, the exchange rate can make a difference in the actual dollar amount of the foreign transaction fee.

Foreign transaction fees by issuer

Card issuer: Foreign transaction fee:
American Express 2.7%
Barclays 3%
Bank of America 3%
Chase 3%
Citi 3%
U.S. Bank 3% for different currencies; 2% for USD transactions
Wells Fargo 3%

These are the standard foreign transaction fees across some of the major U.S. credit card issuers, but keep in mind that these may vary between cards within an issuer’s lineup.

Some issuers like Capital One, Discover and USAA elect to not charge foreign transaction fees on any of their cards.

Even though each of the issuers listed above does charge a foreign transaction fee on at least one of their cards, many will have card options without foreign transaction fees.

Which issuers are most widely accepted internationally?

Something else to seriously consider when traveling abroad is that not every payment network is accepted worldwide. Mastercard and Visa are by and large the two most popular networks — if a merchant abroad accepts credit cards, it is likely going to accept one of these cards.

Discover and American Express, which are commonly accepted in the U.S., may not be accepted around the world. This is why it’s a smart idea to have multiple types of cards in your wallet.

Issuers often will have card options that operate on different networks. All Chase credit cards operate on the Visa payment network. Barclays, Citi and Capital One offer cards on both the Visa and Mastercard networks. Wells Fargo uses the Visa network for some cards and the American Express network for others. Discover and American Express, of course, always use their own payment networks.

If you have at least one Visa and one Mastercard, you’ll likely have a card that is accepted almost anywhere. Just keep in mind that in many places around the world, cash is still king. In Asia, Africa and parts of Europe, many smaller merchants will either not accept credit cards or they will charge a high (sometimes 10%) surcharge on any credit card payment.

While you should always use a credit card when possible (and beneficial), it’s good to have local currency in hand whenever you are traveling.

Will you be charged a foreign transaction fee when booking international trips online?

You don’t have to be in another country to rack up a foreign transaction fee. If you make a payment online that gets routed through a non-U.S. bank, you might see that pesky fee tacked onto your bill. This can happen when you are buying from a company that is not based in the U.S., but it also happens when booking hotels abroad.

Most properties within major hotel brand portfolios like Hilton or Marriott are individually owned and managed, but reservations are facilitated through a brand-wide website. This means that while your reservation may be made on a U.S. website and you may pay in USD, the room charges may be processed by the hotel itself through a non-U.S. bank.

It’s generally hard to tell in these cases whether you’ll be charged a foreign transaction fee until after the payment is already processed. So it’s a best practice to use a card with no foreign transaction fees for booking purposes. Luckily, most top credit cards for booking hotel stays come with no such fees.

Tips for using your credit card abroad

Aside from the general best practices to using your card in general, here are a few things to consider while abroad:

  • Let your issuer know you’ll be traveling — Some issuers ask that you register your travel ahead of time so that the bank knows you’re abroad and doesn’t label purchases as fraudulent. While not every issuer requires it, it’s always a good idea to let them know you’ll be using your card outside of your usual area.
  • Have a mix of credit cards — When traveling outside of the U.S. not all payment networks are accepted universally (Amex and Discover are popular in the U.S. but not always commonly accepted abroad, for example). It’s a good idea to have a mix of Visa, Mastercard and other types of cards in your wallet that you can use on purchase when you travel.
  • Understand local currency and exchange rates — If you’re asked if you want to make a purchase in U.S. dollars or in the local currency, always choose the local currency. Generally speaking, you’ll get a better exchange rate when you allow your credit card to make that conversion than asking a merchant to use their exchange rate to convert a purchase into USD.
  • Have a chip-and-PIN credit cardChip-and-PIN cards use a PIN number for payment authentication rather than a signature. In some places, you may find that you need a chip-and-PIN credit card to make certain purchases, especially at unmanned kiosks at places like ticket machines and gas pumps. U.S. cards almost always default to chip-and-signature, but there are some that will automatically switch to PIN when a system won’t accept a signature.

Bottom line

If you’re a frequent international traveler, a card with no foreign transaction fees is a must. The last thing you want is for rewards you earn on your trip to be wiped out by a 2% – 3% fee.

What do you get in return for the foreign transaction fee? Nothing. Banks have no additional costs associated with processing a transaction from Toronto versus one from Tennessee. There are no special data centers being maintained on Christmas Island or any other remote place where you might travel.

TPG staffers have been studying this issue for years and the only conclusion that we’ve been able to reach is that banks simply charge these fees because they can get away with it.

Most top travel cards don’t charge a foreign transaction fee and many cash-back cards have started eliminating foreign transaction fees as well.

If you’re new to The Points Guy, check out our Beginner’s Guide to learn more.

Additional reporting by Katie Genter, Jason Steele, Mike Cetera and Madison Blancaflor.

Featured photo by Isabelle Raphael/The Points Guy.

For rates and fees of the Amex Platinum card, please click here.
For rates and fees of the Hilton Aspire card, please click here.


This is The Points Guy’s permanent page with the best currently available credit cards with no foreign transaction fees, so you can bookmark it and check back regularly for updates. Keep in mind you may see some reader comments referring to older offers below.

Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card

WELCOME OFFER: 60,000 Points

TPG'S BONUS VALUATION*: $1,200

CARD HIGHLIGHTS: 2X points on all travel and dining, points transferrable to over a dozen travel partners

*Bonus value is an estimated value calculated by TPG and not the card issuer. View our latest valuations here.

Apply Now
More Things to Know
  • Earn 60,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $750 toward travel when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®
  • 2X points on travel and dining at restaurants worldwide & 1 point per dollar spent on all other purchases.
  • Get 25% more value when you redeem for airfare, hotels, car rentals and cruises through Chase Ultimate Rewards. For example, 60,000 points are worth $750 toward travel
  • Get unlimited deliveries with a $0 delivery fee and reduced service fees on orders over $12 for a minimum of one year on qualifying food purchases with DashPass, DoorDash's subscription service. Activate by 12/31/21.
  • Earn 5X points on Lyft rides through March 2022. That’s 3X points in addition to the 2X points you already earn on travel.
Intro APR on Purchases
N/A
Regular APR
15.99%-22.99% Variable
Annual Fee
$95
Balance Transfer Fee
Either $5 or 5% of the amount of each transfer, whichever is greater.
Recommended Credit
Excellent/Good

Editorial Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Disclaimer: The responses below are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser’s responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.