Credit card showdown: JetBlue Plus Card versus JetBlue Business Card

5d ago

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JetBlue launched a new range of co-branded credit cards in 2016, giving consumers three great new products to use to maximize their travels with the airline as well as their everyday purchases. The no-fee JetBlue Card is a great product for those just looking to earn JetBlue TrueBlue points at a steady rate without committing to an expensive credit card. However, for those willing to pay a $99 annual fee, both the JetBlue Plus Card and the JetBlue Business Card are great alternatives that rack up points quickly and offer impressive day-of-travel perks to boot.

If you are trying to decide which one to apply for, here is a handy snapshot of their (very similar) benefits side by side.

Card JetBlue Plus Card JetBlue Business Card
Annual fee $99 $99
Welcome offer 40K after you spend $1K in the first 90 days 60K – 50K after you spend $1K in the first 90 days + 10K after an employee card purchase in the first 30 days
Earning categories 6x on JetBlue purchases

2x at restaurants and grocery stores

1x everything else

6x on JetBlue purchases

2x at restaurants and office supply stores

1x everything else

Annual benefits 5,000 bonus points

$100 statement credit on JetBlue Vacations package

5,000 bonus points

$100 statement credit on JetBlue Vacations package

JetBlue benefits Free checked bags

50% off inflight food and beverages

Spend $50K, get Mosaic status

10% redeemed points back

Free checked bags

50% off inflight food and beverages

Spend $50K, get Mosaic status

10% redeemed points back

Other benefits No foreign exchange fees

World Elite Mastercard perks and travel protections

No foreign exchange fees

Primary rental car insurance

The information for the JetBlue Plus and JetBlue Business cards has been collected independently by The Points Guy. The card details on this page have not been reviewed or provided by the card issuer.

Now for a more detailed look at both cards and how they differ.

In This Post

(Photo by Isabelle Raphael/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Isabelle Raphael/The Points Guy)

Annual fee

Not much difference here: Both cards charge an annual fee of $99, which is not waived the first year.

Sign-up bonus

Now for the first major difference. At the moment, the JetBlue Plus Card is offering new cardholders 40,000 points after they spend $1,000 in the first 90 days and pay the annual fee. That is worth about $520, based on TPG valuations.

The JetBlue Business Card is offering 50% more points than that. Its welcome bonus is currently 60,000 points: 50,000 for spending $1,000 in the first 90 days and an another 10,000 for opening an employee card in the first 30 days and making a purchase with it in the first 90 days of account opening. While that is slightly more complicated, earning 20,000 more bonus points — equivalent to about $260 in value — is well worth it if you can make it work.

Earning categories

The two cards have very similar earning structures, though their bonus categories vary slightly.

The JetBlue Plus Card earns 6x points per dollar on JetBlue purchases. It accrues 2x per dollar at restaurants and grocery stores and 1x on everything else.

The JetBlue Business Card also earns 6x on JetBlue purchases, but it racks up 2x at restaurants and office supply stores and 1x on everything else.

Which card wins out will depend on whether you spend more on groceries or at office supply stores each year.

Image by Parinda Yatha / EyeEm / Getty Images.
The JetBlue Plus Card has supermarkets as one of its bonus categories. (Parinda Yatha/EyeEm/Getty Images)

JetBlue benefits

Both cards offer an impressive slate of benefits when traveling on the airline. Cardholders of either can check a bag for free for themselves and up to three companions on the same reservation when they use their card to book a JetBlue-operated flight.

They also enjoy 50% savings in the form of statement credits when purchasing inflight meals, beer, wine and cocktails on JetBlue flights. There’s no Wi-Fi discount — but that’s because JetBlue offers its FlyFi product for free.

With either the JetBlue Plus Card or the JetBlue Business Card, members who spend $50,000 or more on purchases in a calendar year receive TrueBlue Mosaic elite status good for the rest of the current calendar year and the following one. This includes time- and money-saving benefits such as waived change and cancellation fees, additional free checked bags, priority check-in, security and boarding, and the ability to redeem points for Even More Space seats, among other perks.

Finally, both cards refund members 10% of their redeemed points, which can amount to huge savings depending on how many TrueBlue awards you redeem each year.

(Photo by Zach Griff/The Points Guy)
Either card will help you earn points for Mint redemptions faster. (Photo by Zach Griff/The Points Guy)

Annual benefits

Both the JetBlue Plus Card and the JetBlue Business Card field two identical annual benefits for cardholders to take advantage of.

Cardholders receive 5,000 bonus points (worth about $65) after their account anniversary and the payment of their annual fee each year. They are also eligible for up to $100 off a JetBlue Vacations package once per calendar year.

Other benefits

Both cards waive foreign transaction fees. However, they have very different non-airline benefits because the JetBlue Plus Card is a World Elite Mastercard, while the JetBlue Business Card is a business Mastercard.

As World Elite Mastercard holders, those with the JetBlue Plus Card are eligible for a $10 Lyft credit after taking five or more rides each month and get a $5 discount on orders of $25 or more from Postmates. World Elite Mastercards also offer cellphone protection against loss or damage. There is a $50 deductible per claim, and a maximum benefit of $800 per claim or $1,000 per 12-month period.

The JetBlue Plus Card includes a few other travel protections that the business version does not. It will cover trip delays up to $300 per trip twice per 12-month period if your flight is delayed more than six hours. Its baggage-delay coverage is up to $100 per day for three days starting at 12 hours. It also offers trip cancellation and interruption protection up to $5,000 per trip, or $10,000 per 12-month period.

Its purchase protection against loss or theft maxes out at $1,000 per claim and $50,000 per account and covers purchases up to 90 days out.

For its part, the JetBlue Business Card offers purchase protection for damage or theft up to 90 days out and as much as $10,000 per claim and $50,000 per account per 12-month period, so this is the card to make your big purchases with. Though it lacks many of the travel protections of the JetBlue Plus Card, the JetBlue Business Card offers primary car rental insurance, so that could be useful to some frequent renters.

Image by Pornchai Jaito / EyeEm / Getty Images
As a World Elite Mastercard, the JetBlue Plus Card offers cell phone protection. (Pornchai Jaito/EyeEm/Getty Images)

Personal versus business credit cards

Think about whether you would get more value from carrying a personal or business credit card. Even if you do not own your own business, you can usually still qualify for a business credit card since issuers know employees and freelancers also require them.

Business credit cards are useful on several levels, including making it easier to separate your personal and work purchases. The activity on them generally does not have a big impact on your personal credit score. Plus, they usually do not count toward banks’ limits on the numbers of credit cards they will let any one person carry, such as Chase’s 5/24 rule, or Bank of America’s rules. So applying for one could be a good way to keep on earning bonuses and rewards.

Which one should you get?

The JetBlue Plus Card and the JetBlue Business Card are both great airline cards that can help TrueBlue members rack up points for free travel (and possibly Mosaic status) even faster. Their day-of-travel perks like free checked bags and inflight discounts are also a big selling point for frequent flyers.

When deciding between the two, think about whether a personal or business credit card suits your points strategy better, and which card’s bonus categories will be more lucrative for your typical spending habits. You might also want to consider whether you will have more use for the personal card’s travel protections or the business version’s rental car insurance and purchase protection.

Read our full review of the JetBlue Plus Card here.

Featured image by Ryan Patterson/The Points Guy.

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