Skip to content

Your complete guide to earning and redeeming with Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan

March 23, 2022
30 min read
Alaska Airlines plane in flight
This post contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. Terms apply to the offers listed on this page. For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page.

Editor's Note

This is a recurring post, regularly updated with new information

Update: Some offers mentioned below are no longer available. View the current offers here.

Editor's note: This is a recurring post, regularly updated with new information


Despite being one of the smaller airlines in the U.S., Alaska Airlines has become a favorite of many American travelers. This is partially due to its loyalty program, Mileage Plan.

Sign up for our daily newsletter

The program has a ton of great partnerships for reciprocal mile earning and burning. It joined the Oneworld alliance last year, so it has partnerships with major airlines like American Airlines, British Airways and Cathay Pacific. Plus, it has non-alliance partnerships with airlines like Icelandair, Singapore Airlines, LATAM and others, giving you a huge suite of airlines to earn and burn miles with.

Further, it’s one of the few airlines that still awards miles based on physical miles flown. This means you can still earn a reasonable amount of miles on cheap tickets, which is great for budget flyers. This is the case for both Alaska flights and flights operated by partner carriers.

In this guide, we’ll discuss the ins and outs of redeeming Alaska miles. We’ll also cover its elite status program, EasyBiz business rewards and airline partners.

For more TPG news delivered each morning to your inbox, sign up for our daily newsletter.

Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan overview

(Photo by Michael Rosebrock/Shutterstock)

Mileage Plan is Alaska Airlines' frequent flyer program. You can earn Alaska miles when flying with Alaska or its various airline partners. The airline has a handful of other earning partners, like a shopping portal, dining program and set of cobranded credit cards. Once you have a stash of miles, you can redeem them for travel on Alaska or any of its airline partners.

Mileage Plan also has an elite status program with four tiers: MVP, MVP Gold, MVP Gold 75K and MVP Gold 100K. Each status tier brings various benefits on Alaska flights, like upgrades, preferred seating and bonus mileage earning. Additionally, Alaska elite members are eligible for limited benefits on American Airlines and other Oneworld partners.

Alaska Airlines partners

(Photo by Benji Stawski/The Points Guy)

Alaska Airlines is known for its huge suite of airline partners, which includes airlines in Oneworld and other alliances. Here’s a quick overview of all of the airline's partnerships.

Oneworld alliance partners

As a refresher, Alaska joined Oneworld in late March 2021. This means that the airline is now partners with these airlines:

  • American Airlines.
  • British Airways.
  • Cathay Pacific.
  • Fiji Airways (Oneworld Connect).
  • Finnair.
  • Iberia.
  • Japan Airlines.
  • Malaysia Airlines.
  • Qantas.
  • Qatar Airways.
  • Royal Air Maroc.
  • Royal Jordanian Airlines.
  • S7 Airlines (partnership temporarily suspended).
  • SriLankan Airlines.

Non-alliance airline partners

Alaska has partnered with airlines outside Oneworld for years now. We’re hopeful these non-alliance partnerships will remain long-term now that Alaska is a Oneworld airline, but only time will tell. Here’s the full list of Alaska’s other airline partners:

AirlineAlliance
Aer LingusNone
CondorNone
El AlNone
Hainan AirlinesNone
IcelandairNone
Korean AirSkyTeam
LATAMNone
Singapore AirlinesStar Alliance

Related: 5 things to know about Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan

Alaska Airlines elite status

(Photo courtesy of Alaska Airlines)

Alaska Airlines currently has four elite status tiers. To earn status, you need to either meet a set number of flight segments (one-way flights) on Alaska or its partners or earn a set number of physical miles, commonly referred to as elite qualifying miles.

You must also fly a minimum number of segments on Alaska flights to qualify. Thankfully, this is a relatively easy requirement to earn. Unlike other major U.S. airline elite statuses, there’s no spending requirement for earning elite status. Alaska status is solely earned on how much you fly.

Here’s a quick overview of each Alaska status tier:

MVP

MVP is Alaska’s entry-level status tier. It offers limited benefits but is relatively easy to obtain for most semifrequent travelers.

You can earn MVP status by doing the following:

  • Earn 20,000 elite qualifying miles on Alaska or its partners, or fly 30 qualifying segments with Alaska or its partners.
  • Must fly a minimum of two segments with Alaska Airlines.

Some of the most notable MVP status benefits include:

  • 50% bonus mileage earning on Alaska and partner flights.
  • Complimentary upgrades to first or Premium class starting 48 hours before departure.
  • Priority check-in and boarding.
  • Two free checked bags.
  • Preferred seat selection.
  • Main Cabin Extra seating on American Airlines (at check-in).
  • $100 discount on an Alaska Lounge membership.
  • Dedicated phone support line.
  • Oneworld Ruby status.

MVP Gold

Things get a little more interesting with MVP Gold status. The requirements are double that of MVP status, but the benefits are well worth the extra effort.

Here’s how much you’ll need to fly to earn MVP Gold status:

  • Earn 40,000 elite qualifying miles on Alaska or its partners, or fly 60 qualifying segments with Alaska or its partners.
  • Must fly a minimum of six segments with Alaska Airlines.

MVP Gold benefits include:

  • 100% bonus mileage earning on Alaska and partner flights.
  • Complimentary upgrades to first or Premium class starting 72 hours before departure.
  • Companion upgrades to first or Premium class.
  • Four one-way guest upgrades.
  • Complimentary premium beverage in Main Cabin.
  • Free same-day flight changes.
  • Priority check-in and boarding.
  • Two free checked bags.
  • Preferred seat selection.
  • Main Cabin Extra seating on American Airlines (at booking).
  • Express security at select airports.
  • $100 discount on an Alaska Lounge membership.
  • Dedicated phone support line.
  • Oneworld Sapphire status.

MVP Gold 75K

Alaska's next tier of status is MVP Gold 75K. The benefits can massively improve the frequent traveler’s onboard experience.

Here’s a look at the requirements:

  • Earn 75,000 elite qualifying miles on Alaska or its partners, or fly 90 qualifying segments with Alaska or its partners.
  • Must fly a minimum of 12 segments with Alaska Airlines.

You’ll get the following benefits with MVP Gold 75K status:

  • 125% bonus mileage earning on Alaska and partner flights.
  • Complimentary upgrades to first class starting 120 hours before departure.
  • Space-available upgrade to Premium class on all Main Cabin tickets at the time of booking, excluding Saver fares.
  • Companion upgrades to first or Premium class.
  • Complimentary upgrades to first class on American Airlines.
  • Four one-way guest upgrades.
  • Complimentary premium beverage in Main Cabin.
  • Free same-day flight changes.
  • Priority check-in and boarding.
  • Three free checked bags.
  • Preferred seat selection.
  • Main Cabin Extra seating on American Airlines (at booking).
  • One international upgrade certificate on American Airlines.
  • Express security at select airports.
  • Four Alaska Lounge passes.
  • $100 discount on an Alaska Lounge membership.
  • Dedicated phone support line.
  • Oneworld Emerald status.
  • Gift MVP status to another member.
  • 50,000 Alaska miles upon qualification.

Related: How to earn top-tier Oneworld status for $1,400

MVP Gold 100K

MVP Gold 100K is Alaska’s top-tier elite status level. It was just launched in 2022 and gives members a broader range of benefits and better upgrade priority.

Here’s a look at the requirements:

  • Earn 100,000 elite qualifying miles on Alaska or its partners, or fly 140 qualifying segments with Alaska or its partners.
  • Must fly a minimum of 24 segments with Alaska Airlines.

You’ll get the following benefits with MVP Gold 100K status:

  • 150% bonus mileage earning on Alaska and partner flights.
  • Complimentary upgrades to first class starting 120 hours before departure with the highest upgrade priority.
  • Space-available upgrade to Premium class on all Main Cabin tickets at the time of booking, excluding Saver fares.
  • Companion upgrades to first or Premium class.
  • Complimentary upgrades to first class on American Airlines.
  • Complimentary premium beverage and snack in Main Cabin.
  • Free same-day flight changes.
  • Priority check-in and boarding.
  • Three free checked bags.
  • Preferred seat selection.
  • Main Cabin Extra seating on American Airlines (at booking).
  • Two international upgrade certificates on American Airlines.
  • Express security at select airports.
  • $100 discount on an Alaska Lounge membership.
  • Dedicated phone support line.
  • Oneworld Emerald status.

Related: All of the elite qualification changes you need to know about

How to earn Alaska miles

Alaska miles are harder to earn than others but well worth the effort. (Photo courtesy of Alaska Airlines)

Alaska miles aren’t the easiest to earn. It isn’t a partner of any major transferable credit card programs like American Express Membership Rewards or Chase Ultimate Rewards. Thankfully, its broad list of airline partners means you can earn when flying with many different airlines. Plus, it has a cobranded credit card, an in-house shopping portal and even a dining rewards program.

Here’s a quick overview of how to earn Alaska miles. Make sure to check out our full guide to earning Alaska miles for more insight.

Earn miles when flying with Alaska Airlines

Mileage Plan is an airline loyalty program, so naturally, you can earn when you fly with Alaska Airlines.

Unlike other major U.S. airlines, Alaska continues to award miles based on the actual length of a flight. You’ll earn 1 mile per 1 physical mile flown in Main Cabin — including on Saver tickets. This means that a one-way flight from Chicago's O’Hare International Airport (ORD) to Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC) earns 2,846 miles, as that’s how long the flight is.

(Screenshot from Great Circle Mapper)

All first-class flights receive at least a 50% mileage bonus. This means the same flight from Chicago to Anchorage would earn 4,269 redeemable miles. Do note that you’ll only earn this bonus if you pay to fly in first class. It doesn’t apply to upgraded tickets.

Remember, elite members earn bonus miles on all Alaska flights too. If an MVP Gold 75K member were to fly from Chicago to Anchorage in first class, they’d earn 9,605 miles with their 125% bonus. Elite bonuses can add up quickly when traveling frequently.

You can also earn bonus miles when flying in higher-fare economy classes. These generally cost more than standard economy tickets but, in some cases, can be more flexible. Here’s a look at the complete earning chart for Alaska flights:

(Screenshot from alaskaair.com)

Related: Airline miles that are hardest to earn — and why you want them anyway

Credit partner flights to Mileage Plan

You can earn miles when flying with Alaska’s extensive list of airline partners. (Photo by Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto/Getty Images)

You can also credit partner flights to Mileage Plan and earn both redeemable and elite qualifying miles.

The number of miles you’ll earn depends on the airline you fly, the length of your flight and your fare class. You can view the earning levels for your specific partner and fare class on Alaska’s partner page.

Select the partner you’re flying with and look for the earning chart at the center of the screen. Then, match your ticket’s fare class to its respective row and multiply your flight’s mileage by the percentage listed in the “Miles earned (total)” column.

(Screenshot from alaskaair.com)

For example, British Airways I fare business class earns 250% mileage flown. This means a flight from New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) to London's Heathrow Airport (LHR) would earn a nice 8,627 Alaska miles since the flight is 3,451 miles long.

Elite members earn bonus miles on partner flights too. An Alaska MVP elite member would earn 12,940 miles on this flight with their 50% bonus.

The “Elite-qualifying miles” column shows you how many status qualifying miles you’ll earn with a partner flight too. For this example, you’d earn 5,176 miles since British Airways’ I fare class earns 150% elite qualifying miles.

Because of these high earning rates, I often credit partner flights to Alaska. I also find that Alaska miles are significantly more valuable than most other airline miles — you’ll see why in the redemption section of this article.

Spend on an Alaska Airlines credit card

Alaska Airlines has two cobranded credit cards with Bank of America: one personal card and one business card.

These let you earn Alaska miles on your everyday spending and offer solid sign-up bonuses. The cards include other inflight benefits, including an annual Companion Fare that helps offset their annual fees.

Here’s a look at both cards:

Alaska Airlines Visa Signature® credit card

(Photo by John Gribben for The Points Guy)

The Alaska Airlines Visa Signature credit card is Alaska’s personal credit card. It earns 3 miles per dollar spent on eligible Alaska purchases and 1 mile per dollar everywhere else. Plus, you’ll enjoy an annual Companion Fare you can use to bring a friend or family member with you on a trip starting at $121 ($99 fare plus taxes and fees from $22). You also get a free checked bag on all Alaska flights, and 20% back on inflight purchases.

Current offer: Get 40,000 bonus miles, a $100 statement credit, and Alaska's Famous Companion Fare from $121 ($99 fare plus taxes and fees from $22) when you make $2,000 or more in purchases within the first 90 days of opening your account.

Related: Unlock access to valuable miles: A review of the Alaska Airlines Visa Signature card

Alaska Airlines Visa® Business card

The Alaska Airlines Visa® Business card is simply the business version of the personal Alaska card. The card earns the same 3 miles per dollar spent on eligible Alaska Airlines purchases and 1 mile per dollar on all other purchases, and includes a Companion Fare and a free checked bag on all Alaska flights.

You can earn 70,000 bonus miles after you make at least $4,000 in purchases within the first 90 days of opening your account

Related: Alaska Airlines Visa Signature vs. Alaska Airlines Visa Business

Other ways to earn Alaska miles

There are a handful of other great ways to earn Alaska miles on your everyday purchases. Two of the best options are using the Mileage Plan Shopping portal when shopping online and the Mileage Plan Dining program when dining out. Here’s a quick overview of both programs.

On the shopping side, Mileage Plan Shopping awards bonus miles whenever you click through the Alaska portal before making an online purchase. It offers bonus miles with hundreds of different merchants, including Apple and Saks Fifth Avenue. Each merchant awards a different number of miles per dollar spent and rates can fluctuate frequently.

(Screenshot from mileageplanshopping.com)

Keep an eye out for shopping portal deals too. Sometimes Mileage Plan Shopping runs limited-time bonuses for spending a certain amount of money. For example, I recently earned 500 bonus miles after spending $150 through the portal. These can be a great way to boost your mileage bonus by making purchases you already planned on making.

On the other hand, Mileage Plan Dining lets you earn bonus miles when you eat at participating restaurants. Create an account on the Mileage Plan Dining website and link your credit cards to your account. You’ll automatically earn Alaska miles when you dine at a participating restaurant in addition to the points you earn with your credit card. So, make sure to use a card that earns bonus points on dining.

You can view restaurants that participate in the Mileage Plan Dining program on Alaska’s website. There’s even a tool you can use to find restaurants near a location of your choice.

(Screenshot from mileageplan.rewardsnetwork.com)

The number of miles you earn depends on your Mileage Plan Dining membership tier. These include:

  • Basic members: 1 mile per 2 dollars spent.
  • Select members: 3 miles per dollar spent, earned after you enroll in email communications from Mileage Plan Dining.
  • VIP members: 5 miles per dollar spent, earned after you enroll in email communications and dine at participating restaurants 11 times.

Even better, you can earn 1,000 bonus Alaska miles after your first purchase. Just spend $30 at a participating restaurant and review it on the Mileage Plan Dining website to qualify.

There are other ways to earn Alaska miles, too, such as booking rental cars and hotel stays with Alaska partners. You can learn more about these earning opportunities in our full guide to earning Alaska miles.

Related: Your guide to maximizing shopping portals for your online purchases

How to redeem Alaska miles

(Photo by Nicky Kelvin/The Points Guy)

Now for the fun part: redeeming Alaska miles!

You can redeem your Alaska miles for flights on Alaska Airlines and its various partner airlines. You’ll get the best deal when redeeming on partners —especially if you opt for international first or business class. Stay tuned; I’ll run through some of the best deals later in the article.

Here’s a look at how to redeem Alaska miles. You can see more details in our full guide to redeeming Alaska miles.

Things to know about Alaska Airlines awards

Before we dive into award pricing, there are a few things you should know about Mileage Plan award tickets.

The first is that awards operated by Alaska Airlines are dynamically priced. The price you’ll pay for a specific award ticket varies by route and day.

That said, the airline has provided ranges on how much an Alaska Airlines award costs. Here’s a look:

  • Main Cabin: 5,000-50,000 miles.
  • First class: 15,000-95,000 miles.

You’ll generally find the lowest-priced awards on short flights — think Seattle to Portland, Oregon, and Los Angeles to San Francisco.

(Screenshot from alaskaair.com)

That said, it’s possible to find reasonably priced award tickets on longer routes too. Check out this flight from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA) to New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK):

(Screenshot from alaskaair.com)

Ironically enough, using your Alaska miles for an Alaska award ticket isn’t usually the best way to use your miles. You’ll see why in the next section that discusses award tickets. That said, if you have a stash of Alaska miles and you need to fly Alaska, double-check the cash price and see if it’s worth spending your hard-earned miles on the ticket.

Things to know about partner awards

Things get really interesting when booking partner award tickets.

Each partner has its own award chart that you can view on the Alaska website. Simply input the region you’d like to fly to and from. You’ll see award pricing for all of Alaska’s partners that fly between the two regions.

Related: You can now redeem Alaska miles on Royal Air Maroc — but here’s why you shouldn’t

Let's say I want to fly from New York to Tel Aviv. I’ll input “Continental US, Alaska and Canada” and “Middle East.” The website will show all of the airlines that fly between the regions and their respective pricing.

(Screenshot from alaskaair.com)

You’ll see that pricing varies by airline. This gives me an idea of what to expect when I enter my award search on the Alaska Airlines website.

In some cases, the price differences can be quite significant from one partner to the next. For instance, many of Alaska's newest redemption partners like Iberia, Royal Air Maroc and Royal Jordanian charge much higher rates than Alaska's original partners.

Also, note that some partner awards are dynamically priced. For instance, American Airlines award flights in the U.S. and Canada now only have starting prices and then “vary depending on demand.” Alaska also introduced dynamic pricing for certain awards booked on Aer Lingus, LATAM, Malaysia Airlines and Qatar Airways.

Related: Alaska Mileage Plan is making major changes

(Screenshot from alaskaair.com)

You can add stopovers to one-way award tickets

One of the best parts of booking partner tickets with Alaska Airlines is that you can add stopovers to one-way award tickets. Tickets with stopovers cost the same as a nonstop flight to your final destination.

Your stopover can be operated by either Alaska Airlines or a single partner. This means you can book a British Airways award ticket from Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) to Chicago (ORD) on Alaska Airlines, enjoy a few days in Chicago and then continue to London on a British Airways flight.

Likewise, you can book New York (JFK) to London on British Airways, spend a few days in London and then continue to Prague Airport (PRG) on British Airways.

However, you cannot book New York (JFK) to Helsinki Airport (HEL) on Finnair and then fly to London on a British Airways flight.

How to book Alaska Airlines award tickets

You can book most Alaska Airlines and partner award tickets on the Alaska website. Log in to your account and enter your search criteria on the home page. Be sure to select the “Use miles” option to search for award flights. Then, click the “Find Flights” button when you’re ready to search.

(Screenshot from alaskaair.com)

You can now view all available award tickets at the center of the screen. If you see a ticket you like, select it and click the “Add to cart” button at the bottom right-hand corner of the screen. Then, follow the on-screen prompts to finish booking your ticket.

(Screenshot from alaskaair.com)

You can book stopovers on the Alaska Airlines website too. To do this, click the “All search options” link on the homepage. Then, select “Multi-city” under the flight type header on the left-hand side of the screen. Here, you can enter your flights and search for connecting tickets.

(Screenshot from alaskaair.com)

You can see all available flight options at the center of the screen. Both the flight to your stopover and final destination will show on the same line. If you like what you see, you can book your ticket as you would any other Alaska ticket.

(Screenshot from alaskaair.com)

In this example, I looked for a ticket from New York to London with a stopover in Dublin on Aer Lingus. This ticket cost 30,000 miles one-way in economy and 60,000 in business class. Again, this is the same price as flying the same route without a stopover on Aer Lingus.

Related: How to book free stopovers with Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan

Beware of mixed-class award tickets

You may notice a small chair icon next to the business-class award price. This indicates that your flight has a mixed-cabin itinerary. You’ll see this on connecting tickets when one of your legs doesn’t have the requested class of service.

(Screenshot from alaskaair.com)

Click on this icon to see which leg is downgraded to a lower class. In the case of my award flight from New York to Dublin to London, the Dublin-to-London leg is in economy. This is because Aer Lingus doesn’t offer business class on this flight.

(Screenshot from alaskaair.com)

Always check this before you book an award ticket with Alaska Airlines. Sometimes, the short leg of your flight will have business-class space, while the longer leg only has economy award space. Unfortunately, Alaska charges the same business-class price regardless of which leg is in business and which is in economy.

Related: Here’s why Alaska Airlines miles are the most valuable

EasyBiz business rewards

Use EasyBiz to earn bonus Alaska miles on employee travel. (Photo by Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock)

Alaska Airlines also has a business rewards program called EasyBiz. This program rewards businesses for employee travel based on how much an employee’s ticket costs. Rewards earned with EasyBiz are earned in addition to the employee’s mileage earnings, so it won’t take away from the employee’s frequent flyer balance.

Your business will earn 1 Alaska mile for every dollar spent on employee fares, and you gain access to other features like 24-hour reservation holds, travel management tools and ticket reports. These can help your business better manage employee travel and earn rewards on the money you’re already spending on employee travel.

You can enroll in EasyBiz on Alaska’s website. The airline will give you a unique EasyBiz number that you, your employees or your travel agent can attach to all Alaska bookings. The bonus miles will be added to your business account after your employee’s travel is complete.

Related: Airline loyalty programs for small businesses

Mileage Plan redemption sweet spots

(Photo by Emily McNutt/The Points Guy)

Now that you’re brought up to speed on everything Mileage Plan, let’s take a look at some of the best ways to use your Alaska miles.

Of course, this isn’t a definitive list of all the best redemptions. Check out our full article on Alaska award chart sweet spots for more inspiration.

Cathay Pacific first and business class to Australia

The Hong Kong-based Cathay Pacific is regarded as one of Asia’s best airlines. It has some of the best first- and business-class products in the sky, with great onboard catering, excellent service and lie-flat seats. While it's currently limited due to the pandemic, the airline normally offers a huge route network that spans most major cities around the world — including many in Australia.

(Screenshot from alaskaair.com)

Alaska offers great deals on flights to Australia — for example, one-way flights in business class cost 60,000 miles and first class costs just 80,000 miles. Round-trip Cathay Pacific first-class tickets from the U.S. to Asia can cost well over $30,000, so this award packs some serious value.

(Screenshot from google.com)

Of course, you can add a stopover in Hong Kong too. This won’t increase the mileage cost and lets you see two incredible countries in one trip.

Unfortunately, you cannot book Cathay Pacific award tickets on the Alaska Airlines website. To book, use your favorite Oneworld search tool to find award space and then call Alaska Airlines to book. In my experience, this process is quick and easy.

Fiji Airways to Fiji, Australia and New Zealand

(Photo by Photo by Miquel Ros/The Points Guy)

Craving a Polynesian adventure instead? Consider redeeming your Alaska miles for a flight on Fiji Airways.

The airline’s hub is in Nadi International Airport (NAN) — the largest airport in Fiji — and connects to Asia, North America and the South Pacific. It also offers a solid business-class product on flights from the U.S. to Fiji, making the long journey comfortable.

You can book flights from the U.S. to Fiji for just 55,000 miles one-way in business class. Again, this is a great deal for the points — especially considering you can add a stopover.

(Screenshot from alaskaair.com)

You can connect to New Zealand, Australia and other countries in the South Pacific for no extra miles. Even though the airline only flies from San Francisco International Airport (SFO) and Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), you can connect to either of these gateways on an Alaska Airlines flight from elsewhere in the U.S.

For example, here’s a Fiji Airways booking from Harry Reid International Airport (LAS) in Las Vegas to Auckland Airport (AKL) with a stopover in Nadi:

(Screenshot from alaskaair.com)

LATAM to Peru, Brazil and the rest of South America

(Photo by Emerson Gomes/Shutterstock)

Even though LATAM left the Oneworld alliance, it’s maintained some partnerships. One of these is with Alaska Airlines.

LATAM has hubs in major South American cities like Lima, Peru; Sao Paulo; and Santiago, Chile. Alaska defines South America as anything south of Panama, so there are plenty of deals to be found.

LATAM award tickets start at 25,000 miles one-way in economy and 45,000 miles in business class. With the included stopover, you can book something like Miami to Lima to Santiago and see two of South America’s most vibrant cities in one trip.

(Screenshot from alaskaair.com)

Unfortunately, LATAM is another Alaska partner that you need to call to book. You can find LATAM award space on the airline’s website.

Aer Lingus flights to Europe (with a stop in Dublin)

(Photo by Nicky Kelvin/The Points Guy)

Aer Lingus is an Irish carrier based in Dublin. The airline has an extensive U.S. route network, serving major U.S. cities and smaller gateways like Hartford's Bradley International Airport (BDL), Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport (MSP) and Philadelphia International Airport (PHL). This gives you an easy connection to both Ireland and other major European cities.

Aer Lingus is one of the few Alaska partners with semidynamic pricing. In the chart below, you’ll see that there’s a range for Aer Lingus flight prices. All flights with Saver award space are priced at the bottom of the spectrum, while other flights will price higher.

There are some great deals to be had at the lower end of the spectrum. You can book flights from the U.S. to Europe from 60,000 miles in business class, which is an incredible deal.

(Screenshot from alaskaair.com)

You can leverage the airline’s large route network to fly to most parts of Europe. Just note that Aer Lingus doesn’t offer business class on most European routes, so you’ll book a mixed-class award.

(Screenshot from alaskaair.com)

Japan Airlines first class on the cheap

(Photo by Samantha Rosen/The Points Guy)

Another one of the best Alaska Airlines redemptions is Japan Airlines first class.

The Japan Airlines award chart is split up into Asia and Southeast Asia, with the latter costing slightly more miles. Both are exceptional deals, especially for first class. You can book one-way tickets from the U.S. to Asia for just 70,000 miles in first class. Like Cathay Pacific, Japan Airlines tickets can be prohibitively expensive when booked with cash, making this an incredible deal.

(Screenshot from Alaska Airlines)

Again, you can get even more value from these redemptions when you add a stopover. Japan Airlines has an extensive flight map within Asia, so you can fly to places like Singapore; Hanoi, Vietnam; and Taipei, Taiwan, with a stop in Tokyo along the way.

Related: Book this, not that: Oneworld award flights

Bottom line

Between its extensive network of partners and solid award chart, Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan is one of the best airline loyalty programs on the market. That said, a devaluation might be coming with the program expanding dynamic award pricing and charging sky-high rates for its newest redemption partners. Until then, you should consider earning miles with the program the next time you fly with one of the airline’s partners.

Additional reporting by Benji Stawski.

Updated on 5/4/22.

Featured image by LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 13: Alaska Airlines Airbus A320-214 takes off from Los Angeles international Airport on January 13, 2021 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by AaronP/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images)
Editorial disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airline or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.