How to Redeem One Million JetBlue Points

Mar 8, 2019

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JetBlue has long been known for its customer-friendly experience, superior (and TPG Award-winning) Mint business class and extensive East Coast route network. Its TrueBlue loyalty program is also simple — the program lets you redeem for any seat (yes, even Mint seats) on any JetBlue flight across its entire route network. This is a welcome change from legacy carriers’ loyalty programs that only let you redeem on flights that have specific availability.

But what if you found yourself with 1 million JetBlue points? How would you spend them? Well, if you donate to our current Prizeo campaign, you could answer this very question in real life. We’re giving away a million JetBlue points to one lucky reader who donates at least $10 to support The Kelly Gang, a New York-based charity that supports various causes across the city. You’ll also enjoy round-trip airfare to and hotel accommodations in New York City for an in-person planning session with The Points Guy himself, Brian Kelly.

Should you take home the grand prize, you’ll be in good company. The last time we gave away a million JetBlue points was for a photo contest and scavenger hunt in 2016, and our winner was Brian Biros (who incidentally now writes The Points & Miles Backpacker column for our site). He spread the love with his haul of points, including honeymoon flights to Hawaii for his sister, a long weekend with his parents and some Caribbean jaunts with friends.

If you’re already picturing your seven-digit TrueBlue account balance, it’s time to start dreaming of how to put those points to use. Here are some ways you could use a million JetBlue points.

Fly New York to Los Angeles in Mint … 15+ Times

JetBlue announced its revolutionary new business class product in 2013. Dubbed Mint, this product features fully lie-flat seats and upgraded service on select transcontinental flights out of Boston (BOS), New York-JFK, and Fort Lauderdale (FLL). Additionally, the product flies on select international routes, like New York-JFK to Liberia, Costa Rica (LIR) and St. Maarten (SXM).

A Mint mini-suite (Photo by Benji Stawski/TPG)
A Mint mini-suite (Photo by Benji Stawski/TPG)

JetBlue prices its awards based on the cash price of the ticket. The more expensive the ticket, the more points it will take to book. TPG’s most recent valuations peg TrueBlue points at 1.3 cents apiece, but this can vary slightly depending on the exact flight you book. Transcontinental Mint tickets from New York-JFK to Los Angeles (LAX) typically cost somewhere between 60,000 and 80,000 points one-way, so you can fly the route over 15 times with one million TrueBlue points. However, this price can drop significantly if you snag a deal alert or look at the carrier’s shorter Mint routes to the Caribbean.

Want to save your points and fly New York to LA in economy class instead? With awards starting at just 10,000 points, you can fly the route a whopping 100 times one-way for just the cost of taxes ($5.60).

Take 151 of Your Closest Friends to Havana

Havana, Cuba. (Photo by @yellowillow via Twenty20)
You and many of your friends could be living the life in Havana this spring. (Photo by @yellowillow via Twenty20)

Let’s say you’re planning a late-spring getaway with friends. How about taking 151 of your closest friends from Ft. Lauderdale to Havana (HAV) this May? Round-trip award tickets for the second week of May are just 6,600 TrueBlue points round-trip, so the only problem you’ll run into is filling up all of the 100 seats on JetBlue’s E190 aircraft. With multiple flights per day, however, chances are quite good that you could split up over a couple of different flights.

Take 22 Trips From the West Coast to Hawaii and Back

JetBlue has one mileage redemption partner: Hawaiian Airlines. Unlike the rest of JetBlue’s award tickets, Hawaiian Airlines flights are priced on a standard award chart. A flight from the West Coast to Hawaii is 22,000 points one-way, so you can fly from any of the carrier’s West Coast gateways to Hawaii and  back 22 times with a few points to spare — not a bad way to spend your weekends.

A Hawaiian Airbus A330 at JFK (Photo by Alberto Riva/TPG)
A Hawaiian Airbus A330 at JFK (Photo by Alberto Riva/TPG)

The value of these redemptions increases if you’re based in the Aloha State. Hawaiian Airlines operates an international route network from its Honolulu (HNL) hub, including flights to Tokyo-Narita (NRT), Seoul (ICN) and more. These routes cost 70,000 one-way in business class, so you can explore Asia in style with 14 one-way tickets.

Be sure to check out our guide to booking Hawaiian Airlines flights with points and miles for additional details.

Take 60+ Discounted Weekend Vacations

Finally, you can redeem your points for discounted JetBlue Vacation packages. These awards let you combine TrueBlue points and cash for discounted hotel and flight packages. For example, you can use 16,600 TrueBlue points and $596 for round-trip tickets between New York-JFK and Chicago-O’Hare (ORD) and a two-night stay at The Godfrey Hotel Chicago.

The cost of these package will vary destination to destination, but in the case of the itinerary above, you could take over 60 discounted solo trips to the Windy City. The total cost of this trip if you booked the flight ($285) and hotel ($702) separately is $987 on the September dates I used above, so your 16,600 points are saving you $391. That’s a value of 2.35 cents per point. Multiply this by 60 and your million JetBlue points are saving you a cool $23,460.

Bottom Line

There’s no debating that one million JetBlue TrueBlue points can get you a ton of free travel. If I found myself with a million TrueBlue points, I’d spend the miles on a few transcontinental trips in Mint business class and save a few hundred thousand for JetBlue’s likely London expansion. With frequent deals and no blackout dates, the sky is the limit if you’re selected as the winner of our Prizeo campain.

But hurry! The sweepstakes close on April 30, and some of the prizes for donating are available only while supplies last. Support a terrific cause today and you may take home the grand prize.

Now it’s your turn to dream: How would you spend a million JetBlue TrueBlue points? Let us know in the comments below.

Featured photo by Zach Honig/The Points Guy.

Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card

WELCOME OFFER: 80,000 Points

TPG'S BONUS VALUATION*: $1,600

CARD HIGHLIGHTS: 2X points on all travel and dining, points transferrable to over a dozen travel partners

*Bonus value is an estimated value calculated by TPG and not the card issuer. View our latest valuations here.

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More Things to Know
  • Earn 80,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $1,000 toward travel when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®.
  • 2X points on travel and dining at restaurants worldwide, eligible delivery services, takeout and dining out & 1 point per dollar spent on all other purchases.
  • Get 25% more value when you redeem for airfare, hotels, car rentals and cruises through Chase Ultimate Rewards. For example, 80,000 points are worth $1,000 toward travel.
  • Get unlimited deliveries with a $0 delivery fee and reduced service fees on orders over $12 for a minimum of one year on qualifying food purchases with DashPass, DoorDash's subscription service. Activate by 12/31/21.
  • Earn 5X points on Lyft rides through March 2022. That’s 3X points in addition to the 2X points you already earn on travel.
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