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Not quite there: A review of Kuwait Airways in economy on the 777 from Kuwait to London

Jan. 13, 2020
17 min read
Not quite there: A review of Kuwait Airways in economy on the 777 from Kuwait to London
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[tpg_rating ticket-class="0" tpg-rating-score="77" ground-experience="3" cabin-seat="27" amens-ife="30" food-bev="12" service="5" pros="Great seats with excellent headrests on a new plane, authentic Arabic food and very affordable cash fares" cons="A cramped new airport in Kuwait and forgettable service" /]

Emirates, Etihad, Qatar. These three Middle Eastern airlines are household names with renowned products and service. But there are other, lesser-known airlines in the Gulf region that are fighting for the same global brand recognition that the so-called ME3 enjoy. One of them is Kuwait Airways, the flag carrier of the State of Kuwait.

It operates a fleet of 30 aircraft, a fraction of those of some of its Gulf rivals, but it has an interesting long-haul route network using mostly new Boeing 77s to connect between Europe and Asia via its only hub in Kuwait City. It also has a single route to North America, to New York-JFK.

I knew little about the airline other than that no alcohol is served on board, in line with Kuwait's prohibition on alcohol. On a recent visit to Kuwait to see if there were enough activities to keep an average tourist entertained, I jumped at the chance to try one of the airline's flagship routes.

(TPG is aware of the airline's discriminatory policies towards travelers holding passports from Israel, who are barred from its flights. We do not condone such behavior, and this review does not constitute an endorsement of this policy.)

Booking

Kuwait Airways has its own loyalty program, Oasis Club, which does not partner with any other airlines. As I had no Oasis Club miles, having never flown the airline, I looked at cash tickets.

I only needed a one-way ticket back to London. Kuwait Airways had extremely reasonable one-way cash fares on the nonstop from Kuwait (KWI) to London Heathrow (LHR). It regularly sells one-way fares for as low as $200 all-in for this almost-seven-hour flight, which is a great price for a full-service airline. British Airways charges more than twice as much for the exact same route.

A new competitor flying between the cities is low-cost Jazeera Airways, which operates a cramped, narrow-body A320neo to London Gatwick (LGW). Its fares are cheaper than Kuwait Airways, as you'd expect given the lack of frills, but only around 20% to 25%.

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I paid for the flight with The Platinum Card® from American Express with its generous 5x points on purchases made directly with airlines (up to $500,000 on these purchases per calendar year). This earned 1,000 Membership Rewards points, worth around $20, by TPG's valuations. This effectively reduced the price of this flight by 10%, making a cheap fare even cheaper.

[flight_stats ticket-class="econ" review-stat-section="Ground Experience" tpg-rating="3" tpg-rating-max="5" tail="9K-AOK" age="2.5" late="3" avg="0" avg-2="15" departure="10" departure-2="14" duration="6" duration-2="00" live-tv="0" tailcam="0" headphones="0" comp-alcohol="0" extra-pillows="0" turndown-service="0" /]

I was excited to arrive at a gleaming, new Terminal 4 at Kuwait International Airport, the home of Kuwait Airways. There are truly spectacular airport designs in the Gulf, so I hoped for the same from Kuwait's primary airport.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

Once I found the check-in desks covering my London flight, I was quickly checked in by a friendly and efficient agent.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

Next to the desks for my flight was Kuwait's premium check-in area. Other than being separated by glass walls, it didn't seem to be very private or special. The airline could have created a more premium experience in its new terminal design.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

Security was quick, but once I passed into the gate lounge areas, I realized there was a significant problem: The new terminal is already too small. It has only been open about a year, but the downstairs gate areas are already bursting at the seams, thanks to the narrow walkways and limited seating.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

Look how close the gate seating is to the cafe seating and boarding gate in this photo.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

It made priority boarding almost impossible at the cramped gate areas. Can you imagine trying to board 200 passengers through this tiny maze?

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

There was no lounge access included with my Kuwait Airways economy ticket, and I looked in briefly at the Priority Pass lounge.

Related: Everything you need to know about the Priority Pass program

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

Like the rest of the downstairs section of the terminal, it was small and cramped. There was a sea of people trying to navigate more tiny walkways, dealing with luggage and plates of food and hot drinks and struggling to find seats. It was as relaxing as a city train station during rush hour.

This photo reflects the quietest time I witnessed.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

Upstairs in the terminal, at the gate for my flight, there was slightly more space. More thought had clearly been given to the several hundred people who would be waiting for a flight at the same time.

Our flight, like the Kuwait Airways New York-JFK flight leaving at the next gate, had a cordoned-off gate area. This may have been because of additional security measures, which in this case meant explosives swab tests for every passenger.

Still, our gate area wasn't really big enough for the number of people using it. There were far more seats on the Boeing 777-300ER we were about to board than at Gate 2.

TPG's Alberto Riva reviewed Kuwait Airways in 2018 and had an awful experience at the old KWI terminal. It was nice to have a shiny new terminal, but it's already nearing capacity.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

The boarding area may have been crowded, but was laid out well.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

Boarding started on time with one row for priority passengers and another for all other passengers.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

[flight_stats ticket-class="econ" review-stat-section="Cabin and Seat" tpg-rating="25" tpg-rating-max="30" configuration="3" configuration-2="3" configuration-3="3" width="17.6" pitch="32" tray="13" tray-2="11" lavs="5" live-tv="0" tailcam="0" headphones="0" comp-alcohol="0" extra-pillows="0" turndown-service="0" /]

Economy passengers boarded through Door 2, which allowed a peek at the second business-class cabin, laid out in a 2-2-2 configuration. These seats are the same as most of United's Boeing 767s and 787s, for example, and are fine for a day flight of six hours but hardly industry-leading for longer overnight flights. There is little privacy and storage, and window passengers don't have direct aisle access.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

In the two large economy cabins, the deep-blue-and-white color scheme is elegant and smart.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

I was pleased to see Kuwait has decided on a more spacious 3-3-3 configuration on their 777s like Turkish Airlines. Many other airlines like Air New Zealand, Etihad and Emirates have gone with the denser 3-4-3 layout.

Related: Spaciously satisfying: A review of Turkish Airlines economy on the 777 from London Heathrow to Istanbul

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

The window shades were closed for boarding to keep the cabin cool in the Kuwaiti sun.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

I had a window seat, always my preference for an economy flight review, as it provides a little more privacy for taking photos.

Legroom is 32 inches, which is about as good as one can hope for in economy — some full-service airlines have 31 inches on the same plane — and there was plenty of room for my 6-foot frame; my knees were not crushed.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

The seat features a bifold table. I like these tables because you can open half, which is great when you just need a small shelf for, say, a drink and snack and still want to be able to grab things from around your feet.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

The headrests are excellent. They adjust up and down several inches, great for tall or short passengers.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

The sides of the headrests can be twisted up more than 45 degrees.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

This provided plenty of different sleeping positions. Facing forward, I could lean my head heavily to one side and it would be supported fully -- the folded-up sides did not droop the entire flight.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

If I sat with my knees to the side, I could nestle my head into this space and stay cozy and comfortable while keeping my neck straight.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

I've flown plenty of airlines with economy seats that have adjustable headrests, but almost all of them drooped back to their original position quickly after I leaned my head on them — I'm looking at you, Virgin Atlantic Premium! These headrests may end up drooping over time, but until then I'm seeking them out whenever possible!

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

The spacious bathrooms were clean and there was never a wait for them on this lightly loaded flight.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

[flight_stats ticket-class="econ" review-stat-section="Amenities and IFE" tpg-rating="30" tpg-rating-max="40" screen="8" movies="100" tv-shows="100" live-tv="No" tailcam="Yes" wifi="8.02" wifi-2="2.85" headphones="Yes" comp-alcohol="0" extra-pillows="0" turndown-service="0" /]

A flimsy pillow was on my seat.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

Blankets were handed out just after takeoff. I liked the bright blue color.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

In the seatback pocket was the standard inflight magazine, duty-free mag, sick bag, safety card and headphones.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

The high-resolution seatback screen offered plenty of movies and TV shows. The selection was as good as on British Airways.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

Wi-Fi was reliable but fairly slow and really expensive. You could purchase hourly blocks at a rate of $20 per hour. The $40-for-four-hours package was better value.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

[flight_stats ticket-class="econ" review-stat-section="Food and Beverage" tpg-rating="12" tpg-rating-max="15" live-tv="0" tailcam="0" headphones="0" comp-meal="2" meals-purchase="No" comp-alcohol="No" extra-pillows="0" turndown-service="0" /]

With a 10 a.m. departure, I wasn't sure if we would get breakfast or lunch. Menus were handed out (always a win in economy) showing lunch would be the main meal of the flight, with a choice of chicken ouzi, shrimp murabyan or vegetarian souffle. I was excited to see the two local dishes on the menu; I love it when an airline promotes its own culture rather than just offering the bog-standard red meat with potatoes or white meat with rice.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

I had the chicken ouzi, which was great; the sauce had a rich flavor and the rice was light and fluffy. I also loved the little touches like the side salad that was more like a miniature Arabic mezze and the Arabic bread served along with a standard roll. I enjoyed the local food during my time in the region, so it was great to have one last hit before heading back to Europe.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

The dessert was a mango-and-almond pudding. I was offered non-alcoholic drinks with my meal. I asked for a Diet Coke and received the whole can — branded Coca-Cola Light, which is found in several countries outside the US.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

The meal came with a sealed cup of water. Hard to open, and it can potentially spill everywhere.

https://www.instagram.com/p/B1_yRE5Fz5i/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

The flight was around an hour shorter than a New York-to-London flight and I expected the second meal to be small, but it turned out to be only a light snack of tea or coffee and a single piece of cake. It was disappointing, compared with the first meal.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

[flight_stats ticket-class="econ" review-stat-section="Service" tpg-rating="5" tpg-rating-max="10" live-tv="0" tailcam="0" headphones="0" comp-alcohol="0" extra-pillows="0" turndown-service="0" blurb="Crew performed all required tasks but that was about it." /]

The crew was quite forgettable. The flight attendants did nothing wrong but nothing memorable, either. They weren't particularly warm. In fact, they were quite robotic. Call bells were quickly answered and requests fulfilled, but without a smile or a "Here you are, sir."

The crew didn't exhibit the same pride or enthusiasm you see on carriers like Emirates and Singapore Airlines. Kuwait doesn't fly to the same number of far-flung destinations as the ME3, so perhaps operating to London every week becomes dull and repetitive for the crew.

(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)

Overall Impression

There was nothing bad about the experience, but measuring it against competitors like Emirates and Qatar, it didn't blow me away. Still, at the prices Kuwait Airways charges, it's a solid option from Europe to the Middle East or Asia: full service at an almost-low-cost price.

With a better airport experience, larger network and more motivated crew, Kuwait Airways could be a world-class airline — if it got rid of its discriminatory policies against Israeli passengers. They have a lot of the basics right, but i wouldn't seek them out over the ME3.

All photos by the author.

Featured image by (Photo by Ben Smithson/The Points Guy)
Editorial disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airline or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

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    The Points Guy Exclusive Offer: Earn 150,000 Membership Rewards® points after you spend $15,000 on eligible purchases with the Business Platinum Card® within the first 3 months of Card Membership.

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  • Annual Fee

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  • Recommended Credit
    Credit ranges are a variation of FICO© Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.

    670-850
    Good, Excellent

Why We Chose It

It's hard to find a card that competes with the mile-long list of benefits that come with the Amex Business Platinum. While it's certainly not the card for the average consumer, a business owner with tons of expenses -- especially related to travel -- will find this card incredibly valuable. This card is similar to the consumer version that Amex offers, but with more business-oriented perks around statement credits and earning rates that are a better fit for business owners.

Pros

  • An up to $100 credit for Global Entry or TSA PreCheck application fee every four to five years
  • Up to $400 annual credit for eligible U.S. Dell purchases (enrollment required)
  • Gold status at Marriott and Hilton hotels (enrollment required)
  • Access to the Fine Hotels & Resorts program and Hotel Collection
  • Extended warranty protection
  • International Airline Program and Cruise Privileges Program

Cons

  • Steep annual fee
  • Difficulty meeting $15,000 welcome offer for smaller businesses
  • Limited high-bonus categories outside of travel
  • The Points Guy Exclusive Offer: Earn 150,000 Membership Rewards® points after you spend $15,000 on eligible purchases with the Business Platinum Card® within the first 3 months of Card Membership.
  • Get 5X Membership Rewards® points on flights and prepaid hotels on amextravel.com, and 1X points for each dollar you spend on eligible purchases.
  • Earn 1.5X points (that’s an extra half point per dollar) on eligible purchases at US construction material & hardware suppliers, electronic goods retailers and software & cloud system providers, and shipping providers, as well as on purchases of $5,000 or more everywhere else, on up to $2 million of these purchases per calendar year.
  • Unlock over $1,000 in annual statement credits on a curation of business purchases, including select purchases made with Dell Technologies, Indeed, Adobe, and U.S. wireless service providers.
  • $200 Airline Fee Credit: Get up to $200 in statement credits per calendar year for checked baggage fees, lounge day passes, and more at one selected airline.
  • $189 CLEAR® Credit: Use your Card and get up to $189 back per year on your CLEAR® membership. CLEAR® is available at more than 50 U.S. airports and stadiums.
  • The American Express Global Lounge Collection® can provide an escape at the airport. With more than 1,400 airport lounges across 140 countries and counting, you have more lounge location options than any other credit card on the market as of 9/2021.
  • $695 Annual Fee.
  • Terms Apply.