So You Married an Airplane Clapper — Now What?

May 26, 2018

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While it’s common in other cultures to celebrate upon landing, Airplane Clappers are generally scoffed at here in the US (Puerto Rico excluded). From a Seinfeld episode to a Saturday Night Live skit, society’s message is clear: there’s no need to clap upon landing, unless there’s a good reason such as an emergency landing.

On Thursday, one Twitter user spelled out a truly nightmarish scenario for those that can’t stand Airline Clappers: unknowingly marrying one. The post has struck a chord, quickly going viral on both Twitter and after getting re-posted on Reddit:

Users jumped in to agree with the decision, including this pilot:

While one user thinks a compromise can be found:

This viral post has even prompted a new “Planeclappers” subreddit. Airplane Clappers have joined the community, with one hosting an informal AMA (Ask Me Anything). Other users have posted videos of the phenomenon in the wild. One subreddit user is so embarrassed to have plane clappers in his family that he’s asking for tips on how he can fake his own death:

Me, personally, I don’t mind that people clap when landing to show appreciation for the flight and cabin crew. After all, it can’t hurt for us to take a moment to recognize all of the systems that keep commercial aviation so safe.

But, my problem with every Airplane Clapper I’ve ever experienced: they clap way too prematurely. After all, the flight isn’t over when the back wheels touch the ground. There’s a lot that could still go wrong — although it almost never does — after that point. Yet, that initial touchdown is when the clapping usually begins.

If you can’t stand being married to an Airplane Clapper, there’s one sure way of confirming that your potential significant other isn’t one: flying together. For sure don’t wait until you land at your honeymoon to find out about this dark secret. In the words of one wise lady:

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