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If you’ve ever been on a Ryanair flight, you may be familiar with the grueling (and that’s putting it kindly) experience aboard the plane. As a passenger on any low-cost carrier flight, you’ve already made sacrifices. You’ve lost access to comfortable leg room, regularly priced food, Wi-Fi/cell service and carry-on bag norms. It is the definition of the frustrating phrase, “you get what you paid for.”

Now take all of that, and imagine you are seated behind a noisy bachelor party… cutting up sizable lines of cocaine.


Well, I guess that is one solution to surviving a Ryanair flight. People are rightfully questioning this video’s authenticity.  There is a lot to call into question — and airport security is just the tip of the iceberg.

Yes, they are going to Ibiza, but the white powder, aside from the declarations of the lads in the video, is pretty ambiguous. The flight attendant (who has the demeanor of a worn out school teacher completely over attempting to quiet the class, I should note) doesn’t seem bothered. He even hands out nips of liquor to the passengers.

But let’s not forget that flights to Ibiza are infamous for their drunken, rowdy crowd. Ryanair has even started pushing airports to ban morning drinking in an attempt to limit the racket after an alcohol-fueled incident on Dublin to Ibiza flight caused the plane to divert Paris to remove the “unruly” passengers.

Ryanair’s spokesman doesn’t have much to say on the cocaine matter, stating to the Sun Online:

“We don’t comment on unverified social media videos.”

Either way, as sighted in this Vice UK article, which does a pretty good job of breaking down the facts of the matter, just about anything goes when you’re aboard a Ryanair flight.

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