This post contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page.

Recreational vehicle (RV) rentals tend to be expensive, yet I recently managed to rent a five-person RV in Las Vegas for only $1 per day. In addition to this low daily rate, the rental company reimbursed all of my gas receipts and provided a $100 travel allowance.

So, I was practically paid to rent an RV.

How did I get such a good deal? The secret is that companies are willing to pay you to transport their vehicles (in this case, RVs, but car rental companies are known to do something similar) when they need specific vehicles at a particular location. This is called a “relocation rental.”

Relocation rental daily rates and incentives vary greatly, with some featuring a reduced daily rate ($5 per day, for example) all the way up to generous offers such as the one I booked.

Here’s everything you need to know to find, book and successfully complete a relocation rental this summer.

Who Can Do a Relocation Rental?

Most drivers can do a relocation rental. No special license is required to rent or drive an RV, although most rental agencies will require that renters be over a particular age (usually 21) and have held a license for a certain amount of time (typically at least two years).

If you’re renting in a country other than the one that issued your driver’s license, you may need a translated version of your license, such as an international driver’s license.

Some relocations don’t allow children under a particular age, while others require parents to provide their own car seats.

All the relocation rentals I’ve seen allow at least two occupants, although many charge a fee for each driver after the primary renter. Some relocation rentals allow up to six occupants.

Some relocation rentals allow pets while many others — especially in the US — specifically forbid pets. So double check before booking if you’re planning to travel with an animal.

How to Find Relocation Rentals

Unfortunately for serious planners, most relocation rentals are listed no more than a week or two before the necessary pick-up date — and the lucrative incentives usually don’t appear until a day or two before. If you can be flexible, however, or you live in a city that often has relocation rentals, you may be able to jump on an offer for a last-minute road-trip.

For US-based drivers, Imoova is the most comprehensive search engine I’ve found for relocation rentals. Listings can be filtered by pick-up city, drop-off city and number of passengers — but can also be sorted by other criteria such as earliest pick-up date, latest drop-off date, days included, vehicle type, rate per day and inclusions. Imoova also has listings for Australia, New Zealand, Canada and Europe.

Transfercar is another solid resource for relocation rentals in the US, although — as its name suggests — the company offers more cars than RVs. You can use Transfercar’s handy map of current pick-up locations to browse their full listing and sort by vehicle type, transmission, pick-up location, drop-off location, number of days and what’s included in the rental.

If you find a promising listing on Imoova or Transfercar, read the details of the listing to see which rental company is offering the relocation rental. Then check that company’s website to see if they are advertising relocation rentals on their own site. Some rental companies don’t list their own relocation rentals (in that case, you’ll need to book directly through Imoova or Transfercar), but many do — oftentimes with additional information or incentives.

In the US, for example, Apollo, Jucy and Cruise America will directly list relocation rentals.

When to Book a Relocation Rental

Individual rental locations often book more rentals than their fleet can support, so they must pull RVs from other offices to support the demand — leading to a number of great relocation rental incentives. The prime RV rental season in the US is summer, so this is when you’ll see the greatest number of relocation rental offers.

At the Las Vegas Apollo office where I picked up our RV, for example, they’d just relocated vehicles from Denver in anticipation of demand, but then the demand shifted and vehicles had to be relocated back to Denver.

There’s also shoulder season demand as individual rental locations need to receive new vehicles from the factory in the spring and early summer. Apollo, Road Bear and Cruise America all offer factory relocation deals each spring.

What to Know Before Booking

If you’ve found a tempting relocation rental offer, here are some factors to consider before booking.

Mileage and Duration of Rental

The distance and duration of your rental will directly affect how enjoyable the experience is. In particular, be sure to consider:

  • How many days are included in the rental?
  • Can you add extra days at an additional cost?
  • How many miles are included in the rental?
  • How does this compare with the mileage of your desired route?
  • What’s the cost if you go over the mileage? Is there a penalty fee or a per mile rate?
  • How many miles, or hours, would you need to drive each day to complete the relocation?

The most important aspect is how many miles and hours you’ll be driving each day — especially if you want to stop at sites during your road trip. Remember that RVs generally need to be driven more slowly than cars, so a trip may take longer than your favorite map app estimates. And if you aren’t comfortable driving bulky vehicles, helming an RV can be more tiring than you expect.

Type of Vehicle

Relocation rentals can range from compact cars to six-berth RVs 30-feet in length (or longer). Make sure your rental not only serves your needs in terms of facilities, but is also is a vehicle you can safely drive. In particular, make sure you’re comfortable with the vehicle’s size and transmission type. Most, if not all, rentals in the US feature automatic transmission, but many rentals abroad have manual transmissions.

Incentives Offered

When I booked my relocation rental from Las Vegas to Denver on May 30, there were a number of RVs that needed to be moved out of Las Vegas — meaning I could choose from a handful of vehicle types. I selected the one offering the best incentives: a $1 per day rate, with all fuel reimbursed and a $100 travel allowance.

In general, possible incentives include:

  • A low daily rate
    • $1 per day is common for US relocation rentals
  • Fuel
    • First tank free (goes out with a full tank, can be returned empty)
    • $50 to $350 fuel allowance with receipts
    • Full reimbursement for fuel with receipts
  • Travel allowance
    • $50 to $100, usually no receipts required
  • Propane
    • Full tank provided, can be returned empty
  • A kitchen kit and a linen kit or sleeping bags

Additional Costs

Renting an RV for $1 per day is appealing, especially if you can also get some of the other incentives mentioned above. However, be sure to consider the following expenses that you might incur. I’ve included the expenses for my personal relocation rental experience, but note they may be different for other rentals and companies.

  • Fuel expenses
  • Extra mileage fee
    • $0.45 per mile after included mileage
  • Positioning expenses
    • Flights, buses or car rentals to and from the pick-up and drop-off cities
    • Uber or taxi fares to and from the pick-up and drop-off sites
  • Camp site expenses
    • Varies in cost, I paid:
      • $30 per night in Zion National Park for a site with electric hookup
      • $42 per night at a campground near the interstate with full hook-ups
    • You may, of course, be able to camp for free in select areas with no hook-ups
Zion
Zion’s Watchman campground was a great deal at just $30 per night.
  • Extra driver fees ($3 per person, per day)
  • Add-ons offered by rental company
    • Kitchen kit (included for us, but some rentals charge around $50)
    • Linen kits or sleeping bags ($10 per person)
    • RV-friendly toilet paper ($5 for four rolls)
    • RV toilet chemical ($2.50 per bottle)
    • Generator use ($5 per day or $3 per hour)
    • Optional equipment, such as camp chairs, child seats and a GPS device
    • Cleaning fee ($150 if RV isn’t returned clean)
    • Dumping fee ($150 per tank if gray and black tanks aren’t returned empty)

I limited extras on our relocation by bringing our own sleeping bags and towels, handled dumping the tanks ourselves, didn’t use the generator and cleaned the RV before returning it.

Insurance Options

Using the right credit card is important when renting a car because some cards provide primary car rental coverage. Unfortunately, all of my credit cards that include primary car rental coverage — including the Chase Sapphire Reserve — explicitly exclude recreational vehicles.

However, most (if not all) Citi credit cards feature secondary car rental insurance that includes most vehicles, as long as they have at least four wheels. A benefits specialist confirmed that I’d be covered by the secondary car rental insurance if I used my Citi Prestige to rent the recreational vehicle, and declined the rental company’s CDW/LDW coverage offered at the time of rental.

Apollo, the company I used for the relocation rental, requires a $1,000 bond and includes standard liability at no cost on all relocation rentals. Apollo said I couldn’t decline the included standard liability for the relocation rental. A Citi benefits specialist I spoke with said I’d be covered as long as I declined any coverage I could.

Remember that the primary and secondary car rental insurance provided by many credit cards usually only covers damage to the vehicle you rent. You’ll still want to make certain that your personal car insurance or other insurance covers liability for damage caused to other cars and personal property as well as injuries to people involved in an accident.

Bottom Line

Renting an RV for $1 per day sounds great, but there are additional costs to consider such as fuel, camp site fees, extra driver fees and supplies. If you’re able to jump on a last-minute relocation that includes unlimited fuel and a travel allowance, however — and are just generally comfortable with the idea of driving an RV — it can be a great low-cost opportunity to get away and see the country.

The best beginner points and miles card out there.
Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card

With great travel benefits, 2x points on travel & dining and a 50,000 point sign up bonus, the Chase Sapphire Preferred is a great card for those looking to get into the points and miles game. Here are the top 5 reasons it should be in your wallet, or read our definitive review for more details.

Apply Now
More Things to Know
  • Earn 50,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $625 toward travel when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®
  • Chase Sapphire Preferred® named a 'Best Travel Credit Card' by MONEY® Magazine, 2016-2017
  • 2X points on travel and dining at restaurants worldwide & 1 point per dollar spent on all other purchases.
  • No foreign transaction fees
  • 1:1 point transfer to leading airline and hotel loyalty programs
  • Get 25% more value when you redeem for airfare, hotels, car rentals and cruises through Chase Ultimate Rewards. For example, 50,000 points are worth $625 toward travel
  • No blackout dates or travel restrictions - as long as there's a seat on the flight, you can book it through Chase Ultimate Rewards
Intro APR on Purchases
N/A
Regular APR
17.74% - 24.74% Variable
Annual Fee
$0 Intro for the First Year, then $95
Balance Transfer Fee
Either $5 or 5% of the amount of each transfer, whichever is greater.
Recommended Credit
Excellent Credit

Editorial Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Disclaimer: The responses below are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser’s responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.