How to get to Hawaii: Fly nonstop from 27 mainland U.S. cities

Mar 14, 2021

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Travel restrictions and requirements may change at the last minute if you’re planning an international trip. As such, many travelers are turning to Hawaii when planning trips right now. Plus, from beaches to observatories, there’s a lot to love about Hawaii.

Some airlines are increasing service to Hawaii as travel demand increases. So, today I’ll discuss all the nonstop routes airlines fly, or will soon fly, between Hawaii and the mainland U.S.

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In This Post

Airlines that fly to Hawaii

Waikiki Beach and Diamond Head Crater
Waikiki Beach and Diamond Head Crater (Photo by okimo/Getty Images)

Often, you’ll need to connect when flying to Hawaii. But, here are the airlines that operate nonstop flights from at least one mainland U.S. city to at least one Hawaiian airport:

TPG’s Summer Hull has previously argued why you should fly Hawaiian Airlines to Hawaii. But, I’ll discuss the routes flown by each of these airlines in the following sections.

Related: Here’s everything you need to know about visiting Hawaii right now

Hawaiian airports

Only the following five Hawaiian airports currently have flights arriving from and departing to the mainland U.S.:

But, you can connect onward to other Hawaiian islands using inter-island air transportation. Southwest even operates some inter-Hawaii flights. And, you can rent a car to explore more remote parts of the four Hawaiian islands serviced by nonstop flights from the mainland. You may even be able to snag a reasonably priced rental car using AutoSlash or by redeeming your points and miles for a car rental.

Related: 6 versions of paradise: How to choose the right Hawaiian island for you

How to fly to Honolulu, Oahu

Fly to Honolulu, Oahu
Downtown Honolulu (Photo by Art Wager/Getty Images)

If you want to fly nonstop into Honolulu (HNL), you may be able to fly nonstop from the following U.S. mainland cities.

However, note that some airlines operate these routes seasonally, while others only operate flights on select days of the week.

Related: Flying to Hawaii? Here’s what to expect with inflight food and beverages

How to fly to Kahului, Maui

Kaanapali Beach, Maui, Hawaii
Kaanapali Beach on Maui (Photo by ejs9/Getty Images)

And if you want to fly nonstop into Kahului (OGG) on the island of Maui, you may be able to fly nonstop from the following U.S. mainland cities:

However, some airlines operate these routes seasonally and some only operate flights on select days of the week.

Related: 26 Maui hotels you can book with points

How to fly to Lihue, Kauai

Kauai airport (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

If you want to fly nonstop into Lihue (LIH) on the island of Kauai, you may be able to fly nonstop from the following U.S. mainland cities:

However, some airlines operate these routes seasonally and some only operate flights on select days of the week.

Related: Kauai expanding resort bubbles; 10 reasons to visit Timbers Resort in Hawaii

How to fly to Kona, Big Island

Sheraton Kona Resort and Spa Keauhou Bay (Photo by Summer Hull/The Points Guy)

If you want to fly nonstop into Kona (KOA) on Hawaii’s Big Island, you may be able to fly nonstop from the following U.S. mainland cities:

However, some airlines operate these routes seasonally and some only operate flights on select days of the week.

Related: The 15 most beautiful Hawaiian beaches that we can’t stop dreaming about

How to fly to Hilo, Big Island

Finally, if you want to fly nonstop to Hilo (ITO) on Hawaii’s Big Island, you may be able to fly United from Los Angeles (LAX). However, if Los Angeles and United don’t work for you, you could consider flying into Kona, which is also on Hawaii’s Big Island. Then, you could rent a car and drive over to Hilo. Alternatively, you could fly on an inter-Hawaii flight to Hilo.

Related: Hawaii’s Big Island: 7 things first-timers exploring Hilo need to try

Flying to Hawaii with points and miles

oahu-hawaii-waikiki-beach-2019
Waikiki Beach (Photo by Darren Murph/The Points Guy)

Flights to Hawaii can be expensive. Luckily, you can get to Hawaii using points and miles. For example, TPG’s Summer Hull took her family on a three-week Hawaiian vacation using points and miles. And TPG contributor Ian Snyder leveraged a single card bonus for free flights to Hawaii for a whole family.

In short, there are a lot of ways you can fly to Hawaii with points and miles. For example, you could redeem points and miles to fly on Hawaiian Airlines. You could also redeem Southwest Rapid Rewards points to fly Southwest. But, when flying with Alaska, Delta, United and American, you may be better off booking with partners such as Turkish Miles & Smiles, British Airways Avios, Korean Air SkyPass or Singapore Airlines KrisFlyer.

You could even redeem miles to fly in a lie-flat seat to Hawaii. For example, we’ve seen American Airlines Web Special awards that would allow you to fly to Hawaii in lie-flat first class for just 45,000 miles. And you can book lie-flat first-class seats on new Hawaiian Airlines routes from 40,000 miles.

Related: TPG readers reveal their favorite points hotels in Hawaii

Bottom line

Depending on what you plan to do on your Hawaiian vacation, the best time to visit Hawaii will vary. As this guide shows, there are many nonstop flights between the mainland U.S. and Hawaii. But, if you don’t live in a city with an airport that offers nonstop flights to Hawaii, you may need to book a connecting flight. Some of the loyalty programs mentioned above only allow nonstop itineraries, but it may be worth booking a separate positioning flight in order to redeem through select programs.

Featured image of Papohaku Beach on Molokai by Dana Edmunds/Hawaii Tourism Authority.

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