This post contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page.

American Airlines had said in July that it wanted to roll out basic economy to all domestic routes “by the end of September,” but things turned out a little different: AA just introduced the fare class to its entire network on Tuesday morning.

No matter where you’re originating from or traveling to in the US, you’re likely going to have to pay more to get the same American Airlines “Main Cabin” ticket from before AA introduced basic economy in February. For AAdvantage elites, this means you’ll have to pay more to get a chance at an upgrade. For those looking to qualify for elite status, you’ll have to pay more to get full elite-qualifying miles/segments.

The silver lining is that basic economy isn’t appearing yet on all North American routes. I’m still finding overpriced non-basic economy fares on American Airlines’ Los Angeles (LAX) to Vancouver (YVR) route:

Also good news: it looks like domestic awards are still booking as standard Main Cabin fares and aren’t subject to basic economy restrictions. Since the cost for a cash Main Cabin fare just increased on many routes, Monday morning’s basic economy rollout actually just made AAdvantage miles a bit more valuable on domestic routes — at least where you can find MileSAAver AAvailability.

Now that AA flyers nationwide are affected by basic economy, it’s as important as ever to remember that getting an American Airlines co-branded card can defeat many of the negative aspects of basic economy. Just by having a co-branded card, you can carry-on a bag, check a bag for free and avoid being stuck in boarding group 9.

If you fly AA often and haven’t gotten a co-branded card, here are some to consider:

Bottom Line

We knew that American Airlines’ basic economy fares were going to roll out nationwide soon, but it’s a bummer that the airline rushed to complete this project so soon. With United promising to always offer a basic economy option, interestingly it’s Delta — which originated basic economy back in 2012 — that suddenly has the least ubiquitous basic economy fares of the big three US airlines. If you’re an AA flyer who’s doesn’t mind getting stuck in an airline-assigned seat, make sure to grab a co-branded card to defeat the other aspects of basic economy.

The best beginner points and miles card out there.
Chase Sapphire Preferred Credit Card

With great travel benefits, 2x points on travel & dining and a 50,000 point sign up bonus, the Chase Sapphire Preferred is a great card for those looking to get into the points and miles game. Here are the top 5 reasons it should be in your wallet, or read our definitive review for more details.

Apply Now
More Things to Know
  • Earn 50,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $625 toward travel when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®
  • Chase Sapphire Preferred® named a 'Best Travel Credit Card' by MONEY® Magazine, 2016-2017
  • 2X points on travel and dining at restaurants worldwide & 1 point per dollar spent on all other purchases.
  • No foreign transaction fees
  • 1:1 point transfer to leading airline and hotel loyalty programs
  • Get 25% more value when you redeem for airfare, hotels, car rentals and cruises through Chase Ultimate Rewards. For example, 50,000 points are worth $625 toward travel
  • No blackout dates or travel restrictions - as long as there's a seat on the flight, you can book it through Chase Ultimate Rewards
Intro APR on Purchases
N/A
Regular APR
17.74% - 24.74% Variable
Annual Fee
$0 Intro for the First Year, then $95
Balance Transfer Fee
Either $5 or 5% of the amount of each transfer, whichever is greater.
Recommended Credit
Excellent Credit

Editorial Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Disclaimer: The responses below are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser’s responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.