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The reality of Hyperloop coming to the US is getting closer and closer. This week, Hyperloop One met with policymakers in Washington, D.C. to propose its 11 teams, which would service 35 cities in the US. The 11 teams are proposing plans to compete with 24 others around the world. Hyperloop One will select 12 finalists before choosing three to bring to life.

The 11 teams include routes of varying lengths. You can find the proposals below:

 Route Name Proposing Team   Route Length
Boston-Somerset-Providence  Hyperloop Massachusetts 64 miles
 Cheyenne-Houston  Rocky Mountain Hyperloop Consortium 1,152 miles
 Chicago-Columbus-Pittsburgh  Hyperloop Midwest 488 miles
 Colorado Front Range/Mtn. Network  Rocky Mountain Hyperloop 360 miles
 Colorado Front Range  Colorado Hyperloop  242 miles
 Kansas City-St. Louis  Hyperloop Missouri  240 miles
 Los Angeles-San Diego Hyperloop West  121 miles
Miami-Orlando  Hyperloop Florida  257 miles
 Reno-Las Vegas  Hyperloop Nevada  454 miles
 Seattle-Portland  PNW Hyperloop  173 miles
 Texas Triangle  Hyperloop Texas  640 miles

The longest of the proposed routes, which would run between Cheyenne and Houston (1,152 miles), takes about 16.5 hours to travel by car. With Hyperloop on that route, which is designed to travel at speeds of up to 800 miles per hour, travel time would be cut down to just about an hour and 45 minutes.

These meetings come at a time when the actual Hyperloop test system is within reach of completion. According to TechCrunch, Hyperloop One finalized the tube component of its test track, called DeveLop, this week. It’s located in the Nevada desert and is about 500 meters long. So, if the test tube goes according to plan, the company will be able to work out kinks before a commercial launch sometime in the future.

This news is the latest in the journey of Hyperloop becoming a reality. There are also possibilities of the Hyperloop developing in other regions around the world — Europe and the Middle East, to name a couple. It’s interesting to see these potential routes here at home, which could connect parts of the country in ways never seen before.

Featured image courtesy of David Becker via Getty Images.

H/T: TechCrunch

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