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I was finally able to check flying KLM’s 747-400 off my bucket list before they retire the aircraft. Pros: comfortable seat when reclined, tasty food, exclusive upstairs seating and wonderful service. Cons: dated IFE and an inconvenient 2-2 business-class configuration.

This fall, I traveled with several members of the TPG team to Cape Town, South Africa, for the annual PeaceJam conference. After a fulfilling, memorable and busy trip, it was time to return home. I enlisted the help of the team to score a great redemption. However, I had a limited window of days in which I could travel, and we weren’t having much luck finding award tickets. But we did stumble across a reasonable paid fare that would get me home to New York City in style, though I would have to make two stops on the way.

It turns out that my itinerary — Cape Town (CPT)-Amsterdam (AMS)-Chicago (ORD)-New York LaGuardia (LGA) — would include a leg on the 747-400. To me, that didn’t mean a whole lot, but once some other AvGeek staffers in the office caught word, they immediately told me I was lucky and they were jealous. They explained that KLM had begun the process of phasing out its 744s — that’s how a true AvGeek calls the 400 model of the Jumbo Jet — meaning that I’d be flying on a plane that’s becoming more rare by the day. Go, me! I was already out-AvGeek-ing some in the office on what was my first official flight review for TPG.

Personally, though, I was most excited about the fact that I was flying across the Atlantic in the fabled upper deck of the Queen of the Skies. Another first for me.

In This Post

Booking

As I mentioned above, we couldn’t find a decent award flight to take me home, but after playing around with Google Flights for a bit, we were able to find a cash fare that wasn’t too outrageously priced, considering the typically expensive fares to and from South Africa. We paid a total of $2,246 for the one-way trip from Cape Town to New York with stops in Amsterdam and Chicago with the Platinum Card® from American Express, in order to take advantage of the card’s 5x bonus category on flights booked directly through the airline.

With this purchase, we earned a total of 11,230 Membership Rewards points, worth about $213 according to TPG’s most recent valuations. And since this was a paid fare, I was able to earn airline miles for my flights, too. In this case, I credited to Delta’s SkyMiles program. I earned a total of 16,642 Medallion Qualifying Miles, 2,159 Medallion Qualifying Dollars and 15,113 redeemable miles (10,795 base miles plus 4,318 bonus miles for my Silver Medallion status) for the one-way journey.

If you’re looking to spend your miles on this flight, two places to start your search are Air France-KLM’s own Flying Blue program and Delta’s SkyMiles. Usually, though, Delta charges astronomically high amounts in SkyMiles for premium-class flights, so you’ll likely find more success with FlyingBlue. And if you do find a flight that’s reasonably priced, it’s easy to accumulate FlyingBlue miles, since the program is a transfer partner of all three major points currencies: American Express Membership Rewards, Chase Ultimate Rewards and Citi ThankYou.

Check-in and Lounge

I checked in for my flight at the airport in Cape Town and the gate agents were able to check my bag all the way through to New York. That flight went off without a hitch, and after landing in Amsterdam, I had a tight connection to make. Luckily, the airport is an easy one to connect in, so even with a very short layover, I was able to pop into a lounge before my flight to Chicago. As a business-class passenger, I had access to KLM’s own Crown lounges, but the Aspire Lounge 41 was really close to my gate, so I used my Priority Pass membership from my Chase Sapphire Reserve credit card to gain entry.

I only had a few minutes but quickly discovered, this lounge wasn’t really worth visiting at all. The space itself was totally average in look and feel, but the real problem was that it was absolutely packed. It featured a decent array of food and beverages, but I wasn’t even there long enough to have anything.

If I find myself connecting through Amsterdam again, I’d be curious to spend some time in KLM’s own lounges to see how they compare.

On a long layover at AMS, in any case, you’re not in a bad spot at all. Amsterdam Schiphol had a variety of unique amenities beyond lounges, like a panoramic planespotting terrace and even a library.

Boarding

After my brief visit to the lounge, I hustled to get to my gate and made it there just as boarding had begun. The process began with a call for those who needed any extra time boarding, followed by business-class passengers.

Cabin and Seat

I knew that we’d booked a business-class ticket, but glancing at my boarding pass and seeing “78B” printed on it still made me nervous — it sounded more like a middle seat in economy than business class. But then, I saw the stairs (!) and remembered that I’d picked a seat on the upper deck. I’m going to be honest: It was pretty exciting to climb the stairs in the Queen of the Skies to find my seat. Is it possible that I’m actually an AvGeek in the making?

I made my way on board the 18-year-old four-engined jet, registration PH-BFW, and quickly realized I was the first passenger upstairs. I immediately envisioned myself as the only passenger up there, with the whole deck to myself for the entire flight. My glamorous daydreaming quickly ended once other passengers began filling up the cabin, so I just took my seat.

The seats were arranged in a 2-2 configuration, meaning not everyone had direct aisle access. I had an aisle seat with a small partition separating me from the attached window seat.

On its 747s, KLM places business-class seats on both the upper deck and the nose of the aircraft, which means that even though these were B/E Aerospace Diamond seats that you can also find on United, American Airlines and more, you won’t find them laid out six across like you would on United’s 787-8 and -9 Dreamliners, for example.

There were 35 of these lie-flat seats in total across the upper and lower decks. I was on the aisle, so it wasn’t a pain for me to get up and move around, but the 2-2 configuration wasn’t ideal for solo travelers seated at the window, since you’d have to climb over your neighbor to move about the cabin.

Thankfully, my seatmate was about as good as a seatmate could get and only got up when I did, so it wasn’t awkward at all. I would have enjoyed the configuration much more, though, if I’d been flying with my fiancé or a friend or family member.

My seat was plenty comfortable — especially when fully reclined — and I ended up getting a lot of sleep on the flight. That being said, if you’re traveling alone, you’ll definitely want to snag an aisle seat (unless you don’t plan on moving the entire flight) so you won’t need to climb over anyone to get out.

While the seat didn’t have a ton of storage space, I did have space for my shoes (until I fully reclined), and definitely didn’t feel cramped.

The seat controls were straightforward and easy to use, with clearly labeled buttons on the side of the seat.

The provided amenity kit was nothing special. It came with a very standard collection of socks, toothpaste, lip balm, an eye mask and earplugs — no designer toiletries here.

Food and Beverage

Cabin service started shortly after I took my seat — I started off with orange juice and Champagne for a DIY mimosa.

For my appetizer,  I got the smoked salmon with wasabi cream and Thai salad and was impressed, actually. I don’t typically order fish that hasn’t been cooked over heat on planes, but I was pleasantly surprised by how flavorful it was.

For my main course, I chose the ginger chicken in hoisin sauce with rice and vegetables. While it wasn’t spectacular, the chicken was tender and I enjoyed the rice and veggies, which were cooked just right.

Although I was pretty full, I still got dessert, which was a mango-and-passionfruit mousse with raspberry coulis and a cheese plate. I’m more of a chocolate person, so this wasn’t my favorite, but I thought it was well done.

The prearrival meal was served about two hours before landing. This time it was a Black Angus burger on a brioche bun with gherkins and vegetables, which was truly delicious.

Amenities

While the inflight-entertainment screens were large, they seemed a little dated, and the remote was very old and worked really slowly. Although I was able to find a couple of movies to watch, I wasn’t impressed by the small selection of films.

The outlet was easily accessible and quickly charged my devices.

The provided noise-canceling headphones worked well. I could hear the movie loud and clear through them, and they blocked out external noises.

All the crew members I encountered went above and beyond. Everyone I interacted with was friendly and helpful, always greeting me with a smile and asking if I needed anything. I enjoyed a hot tea before landing, and even got the signature KLM ceramic Dutch house filled with alcohol as a gift to forever remind me of my KLM 747 experience. Now, it’s adding pizzazz to the bar cart in my apartment.

Overall Impression

Flying on an iconic aircraft like the 747 is a really cool experience — especially upstairs — even for someone who doesn’t consider herself an AvGeek. Flying the upper deck really felt exclusive, almost like I was on a much smaller aircraft. Although KLM’s 747s are headed for retirement and don’t feature the latest and greatest in terms of seat, amenities and entertainment, I had a supremely comfortable flight overall, enjoyed my meals and had very pleasant interactions with the crew, which is the most important to me. I’m glad that I got the chance to fly this special aircraft at least once before they’re not around anymore, and I wouldn’t hesitate to fly this again and again if the opportunity presented itself.

The Platinum Card® from American Express

The American Express Platinum card has some of the best perks out there: cardholders enjoy the best domestic lounge access (Delta SkyClubs, Centurion Lounges, and Priority Pass), up to a $200 annual airline fee credit as well as up to $200 in Uber credits, and mid-tier elite status at SPG, Marriott, and Hilton. Combined with the 60,000 point welcome offer -- worth $1,140 based on TPG's valuations -- this card is a no-brainer for frequent travelers. Here are 5 reasons you should consider this card, as well as how you can figure out if the $550 annual fee makes sense for you.

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More Things to Know
  • Earn 60,000 Membership Rewards® points after you use your new Card to make $5,000 in purchases in your first 3 months.
  • Enjoy Uber VIP status and free rides in the U.S. up to $15 each month, plus a bonus $20 in December. That can be up to $200 in annual Uber savings.
  • 5X Membership Rewards® points on flights booked directly with airlines or with American Express Travel.
  • 5X Membership Rewards points on prepaid hotels booked on amextravel.com.
  • Enjoy access to the Global Lounge Collection, the only credit card airport lounge access program that includes proprietary lounge locations around the world.
  • Receive complimentary benefits with an average total value of $550 with Fine Hotels & Resorts. Learn More.
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  • $550 annual fee.
  • Terms Apply.
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Editorial Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

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