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If you’ve been thinking about adding the World of Hyatt Credit Card to your wallet, good news! If you apply through the Hyatt reservation booking path for this targeted offer, you could earn up to two free nights at Category 1-7 Hyatt hotels worldwide, plus a $50 statement credit after your first purchase.

The information for this offer for the World of Hyatt Credit Card has been collected independently by The Points Guy. The card details on this page have not been reviewed or provided by the card issuer.

This offer breaks down as one free night after you spend $3,000 in the first three months from account opening, and another free night after you spend $6,000 total on the card in the first 6 months from account opening. Those are the same spending requirements as seen with the public bonus for this card, which can get you up to 50,000 Hyatt points. But what makes this new offer even better is that you can use those two free nights at Category 7 hotels, which cost 30,000 points per night, so you’re effectively getting up to 60,000 points with this bonus — 10,000 more than the sign-up bonus that awards straight points.

Chase has confirmed that the free nights work at Category 1-7 properties in the terms and conditions, though other sites such as Doctor of Credit have reported that this is the case. We’ve reached out to Chase to confirm and will update this post when we have clarification. Update: Chase has confirmed the 2 Free Nights can be redeemed for stays at any Category 1-7 Hyatt hotel world-wide.

In terms of real-world value, this sign-up could get you stays at posh properties such as the Park Hyatt New York and the Park Hyatt Paris-Vendôme (one of my favorites). There are some great all-inclusive options, such as the Hyatt Ziva Cancun and Hyatt Ziva Rose Hall in Montego Bay, which both cost 25,000 per night. And if you choose to redeem your free nights at an all-inclusive, you won’t have to pay anything out of pocket for food and beverage, making these hotels a great option for families and other larger groups.

This card has a $95 annual fee, and it earns 4 points per dollar on Hyatt stays, along with 2x points on local transit and commuting; restaurants, cafes and coffee shops; on airline tickets purchased directly from the airline; and on fitness club and gym memberships (1 point per dollar on everything else). You get a free night each year after your account anniversary at a Category 1-4 Hyatt hotel, and can earn a second one when you spend $15,000 on the card in a calendar year. The card also comes with complimentary Hyatt Discoverist status and allows you to spend your way toward higher elite status tiers.

Relax with the whole family at an all-inclusive Hyatt property (Image courtesy of Hyatt Ziva)
Relax with the whole family at an all-inclusive Hyatt property. (Image courtesy of Hyatt Ziva.)

Unfortunately, the Hyatt Credit Card now falls under Chase’s 5/24 rule, so if you’ve opened five or more cards across any banks over the last 24 months, you won’t be approved. Also note that you won’t be able to get this card if you currently hold any Hyatt credit cards and/or have received a Hyatt credit card sign-up bonus in the last 24 months.

Bottom Line

Especially if your preferred use of Hyatt points is a higher-end stay at Category 6 and 7 properties, this bonus has the potential to get you even more value than the public offer of up to 50,000 points. Hyatt’s award chart will see some changes in mid-March, but even so there are plenty of great options for using the two free nights from this sign-up bonus, from Park Hyatt locations to family-friendly all-inclusives in tropical destinations.

Featured image courtesy of the Hyatt Ziva Cancun.

Editorial Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

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