French vaccine pass no longer required for travelers as of Monday

Mar 11, 2022

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If you read my column last Friday, you may have seen an editor’s note informing readers of breaking news that the French Vaccine Pass would no longer be required to access indoor spaces effective March 14, as long as COVID-19 case numbers are maintained in the country.

If things go as intended, the removal of the French vaccine pass marks the end of an era of sorts, since proof of vaccination has been required to enter cafes, bars and shopping centers throughout France since July 2021.

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In This Post

The French vaccine pass to be discontinued

What got us to this point?

On March 3,  French Prime Minister Jean Castex announced on local French television station TF1 that the French vaccine pass will no longer be required as of Monday, as long as certain health criteria are met related to COVID-19.

Specifically, the country needs to report less than 1,500 COVID-19 patients in the ICU, along with a specific incidence rate between 300-500 new cases and a virus reproduction rate of less than one.

Are there any places where the vaccine pass will still be needed to enter?

According to the prime minister’s announcement, the vaccine pass will still be required to access “collective passenger transport,” specifically long-distance trains, planes and buses. Vaccination proof is not required on local short-distance public transit, such as the Paris Metro.

Other than transportation, the only places where it will be necessary to show the pass are in medical buildings, hospitals and nursing homes.

French Prime Minister Jean Castex leaves following the weekly cabinet meeting at the Elysee Palace on March 9, 2022, in Paris, France. (Photo by Daniel Pier/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Will there be requirements for tourists wishing to access other indoor spaces?

We won’t know until Monday whether the elimination of the vaccine pass for most public spaces will actually happen, but as it stands, any remaining requirements for indoor access to places that previously required the pass, including restaurants, bars, museums, entertainment venues, sporting facilities, etc, will be removed beginning next week.

Pedestrians pass customers in Paris, France, on Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2022. (Photo by Cyril Marcilhacy/Bloomberg/Getty Images)

Masks are being dropped too

Are face masks still required when the vaccine pass isn’t?

Another big change as of March 14 is that face masks will no longer be required to wear indoors at most public places, excluding public transit, where both masks and vaccine passes will still be mandatory.

A couple wearing protective face masks look at love padlocks hanging on a grid at Montmartre in front of the Sacre-Coeur basilica on Feb. 23, 2022 in Paris, France. (Photo by Chesnot/Getty Images)

Entry requirements for visitors to France-unvaccinated travelers welcomed back

As of March 14, both fully vaccinated and unvaccinated Americans alike will be able to enter France. France considers travelers fully vaccinated if you have been vaccinated with the following vaccines:

  • Pfizer
  • Moderna
  • AstraZeneca
  • Johnson & Johnson

French authorities will accept CDC-issued white cards as suitable proof of vaccination for entry. Remember, you are only considered “fully vaccinated” in the eyes of the French government if you have been vaccinated and boosted and have proof of it on your CDC card.

If you are unvaccinated or partially vaccinated (i.e. vaccinated, but not boosted) and coming from the U.S., you may enter France starting Monday as long as you present results of a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours of departure for France, or a rapid test conducted within 48 hours, to be shown to both airlines and customs officials, per Atout France, the country’s tourism organization.

Guidance from the French ministry says travelers may be tested again upon arrival and would be required to self-isolate for 7-10 days if the result is positive.

These entry rules do not apply to travelers under the age of 12.

A woman wearing a protective face mask on Feb. 10, 2022, in Paris, France.  (Photo by Chesnot/Getty Images)

Have a question for next week? Email me at caroline.tanner@thepointsguy.com or tips@thepointsguy.com.

Featured photo of French President Emmanuel Macron during a press conference at the Palace of Versailles on March 11, 2022 by LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP via Getty Images.

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