This post contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page.

While travel and exercise often end up at the top of most New Year’s Resolution lists, people rarely learn to combine the two — for some, a vacation even becomes an intentional break from the usual routine with no work and no workouts. While a nice hotel fitness center can be a convenient option when you’re on the road, here are seven tips for taking your workout beyond the hotel gym and making it an integral part of your next trip.

1. Go for a Stroll Around Town

A dependable day one activity when visiting any new city is a walking tour — you’ll learn the lay of the land, see the highlights, learn a little of the local history, meet other travelers and best of all, get several miles of walking in. I’m a big fan of free walking tours, especially Sandeman’s New Europe Tours, which operate in 18 cities worldwide — the walking tours are free but guides make their money from tips, giving them more of an incentive to be interesting and entertaining throughout. My golden rule: the more you heard a certain city during your high school history class, the better the tour will be — for me, nothing tops the three-hour history-packed walking tour of Berlin.

The dramatic tale of the night the Berlin Wall fell to conclude a 4 hour walking tour in front of .
The guide wrapped up our three-hour walking tour in front of the Berlin Cathedral with a dramatic tale of the night the Berlin Wall fell. Image by the author.

2. Go for a Run

If you’re missing mileage runs, why not just save yourself the exhaustion and settle for a regular run instead? Although I spent almost the entirety of 2016 traveling, I still managed to train for a marathon and an ultra-marathon, which required logging some serious miles in unfamiliar lands. Waterfront paths and forest preserve trails work best as they’ll have the least amount of things to distract you — like intersections and other traffic-related interruptions — and allow you to see parts of the city you might not otherwise get to see, like graffiti art under bridges or fall foliage in the wild. If you manage to find a path just off the beach, there’s no better — or more refreshing — way to end a run than by jumping in the water.

The best part about my sunrise run along Singapore
The best part about my sunrise run along Singapore’s East Coast Park? Taking a dip in the sea after it. Image by the author.

3. Grab a Bike

Rather than hopping on and hopping off those aptly-named buses, follow a bike tour or better yet, rent a bike for the day and go exploring on your own. Bike sharing systems have popped up in major cities across the globe with reasonable pricing — a full-day pass for Divvy bikes in Chicago starts at $10, for instance. Another great bike option is the 22-mile ride through San Francisco across the Golden Gate Bridge, where you’ll pedal past Sausalito, redwood forests, a floating houseboat city and end your ride in Tiburon to catch a ferry back across the bay.

4. Do Some Yoga

There’s no reason to miss out on your regular yoga practice just because you’re traveling. All you need is a hotel towel or a sarong — you can also bring along a travel yoga mat like I do — and a bit of space in a park, beach, rooftop, or pretty much anywhere with a nice, relaxing view. Flow with the sound of the waves crashing or trees rustling around you. Like always, you’ll finish your practice calm, recharged and ready to take on the day.

Two of my better yoga practices from the last year - an empty field in northern Laos and a guesthouse rooftop in Manang, Nepal
Two of my better yoga practices from the last year — an empty rice field in northern Laos and a guesthouse rooftop in Manang, Nepal. Image by the author.

5. Dance Whenever Possible

No Cuban experience is complete without a sampling of some Salsa dancing (you should also try the Mambo, Rumba or Cha Cha Cha, which are popular here as well). Same goes for the Tango in Argentina, Samba in Brazil or even tribal dancing in Africa. Take a class or just show up at a club and learn from the locals — you’ll have so much fun you won’t even realize you had a workout until you find the sweat stains on your shirt the next day.

6. Try Some Water Sports

The oceans cover two thirds of the planet, and the natural resistance of water provides a great workout while you’re exploring its depths. An hour of SCUBA diving can burn as many calories as a light jog, while the slow, meditative breathing required during your dive can relieve the many stresses caused by the air-breathing world. If you’d rather stay above sea level, opt for an exploratory excursion on a kayak or stand-up paddle board instead.

You may not notice it while exploring the oddities of the ocean, but SCUBA diving is a pretty good workout.
You may not notice it while exploring the ocean, but SCUBA diving is a pretty good workout. Image by the author.

7. Take a Hike

Great views are often the reward for a strenuous hike, the best of which can’t be reached by car. Many — like the Na Pali Coast in Kauai, pictured below — are just a day trip from your hotel, while others can be found in the middle of a big city. The Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio De Janeiro is a must-visit, but not many people know about the steep 90-minute jungle hike you can take to get there from Parque Lage in Rio’s Jardim Botânico neighborhood. The cable car ride to Sugarloaf Mountain should also not be missed, but I’d save it for just the way down. You can actually climb the back side of the mountain, but hire a guide because you’ll need climbing gear for one section of the ascent. After a hearty hike, your caipirinha cocktail at the top will be much more deserved.

You can’t get this view of the Na Pali coast without working a little for it.
You can’t get this view of Kauai’s Na Pali Coast without working a little for it. Image by the author.

Bottom Line

Jogging on a human hamster wheel while watching news about the world you’ve come here to escape is not the ideal way to start the day while you’re on vacation. But if you follow these tips, you can enjoy an active trip fully — and guilt-free.

What are your favorite ways to stay fit while traveling? Tell us about them, below.

Featured image courtesy of the author.

The best beginner points and miles card out there.
Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card

With great travel benefits, 2x points on travel & dining and a 50,000 point sign up bonus, the Chase Sapphire Preferred is a great card for those looking to get into the points and miles game. Here are the top 5 reasons it should be in your wallet, or read our definitive review for more details.

Apply Now
More Things to Know
  • Earn 50,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $625 toward travel when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®
  • Chase Sapphire Preferred® named a 'Best Travel Credit Card' by MONEY® Magazine, 2016-2017
  • 2X points on travel and dining at restaurants worldwide & 1 point per dollar spent on all other purchases.
  • Earn 5,000 bonus points after you add the first authorized user and make a purchase in the first 3 months from account opening
  • No foreign transaction fees
  • 1:1 point transfer to leading airline and hotel loyalty programs
  • Get 25% more value when you redeem for travel through Chase Ultimate Rewards. For example, 50,000 points are worth $625 toward travel.
  • No blackout dates or travel restrictions - as long as there's a seat on the flight, you can book it through Chase Ultimate Rewards
Intro APR on Purchases
N/A
Regular APR
17.49% - 24.49% Variable
Annual Fee
$0 Intro for the First Year, then $95
Balance Transfer Fee
Either $5 or 5% of the amount of each transfer, whichever is greater.
Recommended Credit
Excellent Credit

Editorial Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Disclaimer: The responses below are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser’s responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.