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TPG Editor-in-Chief Zach Honig recently returned from a fantastic family trip to Southeast Asia, but he arrived to a nasty surprise in Bali.

Earlier this summer I signed up for Google’s Project Fi. I’m perfectly happy with my iPhone and Verizon service at home, but Google’s offer of very cheap international data was too good to pass up. To use Project Fi, you need to have a Nexus 6 Android smartphone. Basic Fi service costs $20 per month, then you pay $10 per 1GB of data you use (you’ll receive a refund for any data you don’t use in any given month, down to the megabyte).

Get cheap data in 120+ countries.
Get cheap data in 120+ countries.

All that sounds fine, but it’s the international capabilities that had me sold. You’ll pay the same $10 per 1GB of data when you’re roaming overseas as you will back home. Speeds are capped at 256kbps, which isn’t terribly fast, but it sure as heck beats T-Mobile’s performance. Like with T-Mobile, phone calls (20 cents per minute in the same 120+ countries) and data just work. You turn your phone on when you land, and a few minutes later you’re loading maps and catching up on email.

Which brings me to my trip to Bali…

Staying connected in Bali.
Staying connected in Bali.

I planned a few days off the grid in Bali, but “off the grid” for me means just 30 minutes of email and a few Instagram posts a day. I wasn’t prepared to completely unplug, and I’m not sure I ever will be. Not to mention that I had a family trip to run and no plans at all after our arrival at DPS airport. Not to worry — we rented a wonderful villa on Airbnb that listed free Wi-Fi among its many amenities. Except the internet was out when we arrived, and for a couple days after that.

Just $3.83 for five days of data!
Just $3.83 for five days of data!

My Project Fi phone went from convenient gadget to family lifeline. My mom, sister and I each spent several minutes calling loved ones back home, and I stayed on top of email and planned the rest of our trip, including finding places to eat near the villa, booking a car and driver for a day, locating a phenomenal cooking class and tracking our Garuda Indonesia flight to Tokyo.

All in all, it was a fantastic trip to Bali, made much less stressful by my handy (and shockingly inexpensive) global smartphone.

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Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card

The Points Guy Assessment:

The Chase Sapphire Preferred is a great pick for the beginner and the frequent traveler. The CSP has superb travel benefits, double points on certain purchases, and a 50,000 point sign up bonus. The $95 annual fee is waived the first year so this puts it as one of the less expensive cards, while still allowing you to earn one of the most valuable point currencies.

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More Things to Know
  • Earn 50,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $625 toward travel when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®
  • Chase Sapphire Preferred® named a 'Best Travel Credit Card' by MONEY® Magazine, 2016-2017
  • 2X points on travel and dining at restaurants worldwide & 1 point per dollar spent on all other purchases.
  • No foreign transaction fees
  • 1:1 point transfer to leading airline and hotel loyalty programs
  • Get 25% more value when you redeem for airfare, hotels, car rentals and cruises through Chase Ultimate Rewards. For example, 50,000 points are worth $625 toward travel
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Intro APR on Purchases
N/A
Regular APR
17.74% - 24.74% Variable
Annual Fee
$0 Intro for the First Year, then $95
Balance Transfer Fee
Either $5 or 5% of the amount of each transfer, whichever is greater.
Recommended Credit
Excellent Credit

Editorial Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Disclaimer: The responses below are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser’s responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.