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Top 12 Things That Should Be In Every Hotel Room

by on October 29, 2013 · 65 comments

in Hotel Industry, Top 10

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As someone who spends well over 100 nights a year in hotels, I thought it was high time to put together a post with my thoughts about what every hotel room should offer (and what they definitely should not) in addition to all the basics like free WiFi, good personalized A/C and heating, and, you know, running water.

Some of these are obvious – with the proliferation of lightweight laptops, smartphones, tablets and more, every hotel room should have an abundance of power outlets – while others might be more TPG-specific. However, these are things I’d like to see in every hotel room I book in the future, and feel free to share your own wish list below.

Westin-Desk-Plugs

1. Power outlets galore. As I mentioned, we all travel with tons of gadgets these days, from computers and tablets to phones, cameras, music players and more, and the one thing they all have in common is that they must be charged. So it’s astonishing to me how many hotels still lack more than one or two outlets for guest use – you know, where lamps, phones and other odds and ends aren’t already plugged in. Not only that, but every hotel room should have bedside outlets. So many people tote their computers to bed to work while on the road for business, and so many use their Smartphones as alarm clocks (probably because hotel alarm clocks can be so byzantine to operate) that it just makes sense to have outlets near the bed that you can access without ripping the mattress away from the wall. Tons of lamps even come with outlets in their bases to make things easier. Hotels, take note, this should be a standard feature in your rooms.

Many hotels are now offering a Nespresso machine as an in-room amenity.

Many hotels are now offering a Nespresso machine as an in-room amenity.

2. A Nespresso machine. Call me a caffeine fiend, but I believe that every hotel room should have some sort of miniature coffee or espresso machine. Oftentimes, that’s all I want in the morning before grabbing something on the go from a lobby shop or a nearby cafe. I just want to be able to enjoy my first cup of the day in my room as I go through emails and my calendar without having to get dressed, leave the hotel and pick up coffee somewhere else. Or tea. Put in an electric kettle and some tea bags for the tea-drinkers out there. Who knows, maybe I’ll be feeling so productive I’ll order room service and up your revenue with a full-on breakfast if I feel like I’m getting a lot done.

This shower looks beautiful, but will I be able to turn it on?

This shower looks beautiful, but will I be able to turn it on?

3. A shower that doesn’t take advanced calculus to figure out how to work. Hotel showers can be glorious. Indoor showers, outdoor showers, showers with 12 showerheads, steam showers, rainfall showers…they’re all just wonderful. Except for one thing: so many of them are impossible to operate! Personally, I’m an old-fashioned, one knob for cold water and one for hot and you turn them to adjust the pressure and balance of temperature kind of guy. But so many hotel showers these days have temperature controls, pressure controls, controls to determine which showerhead is operating…I often find myself getting blasted with a rocket of cold water from one direction and volley of scalding drops from another these days. I mean, I love options as much as the next person, but can we please make these things easier to operate so I can get in, clean up and get out? And not to be too American about this, but would it be possible to include both Celsius and Fahrenheit temperatures on the knobs? I can do simple arithmetic on the fly with the best of them, but I don’t want to have to panic and try to figure out why 47 degrees is so hot.

Toothpaste

I always seem to forget my toothpaste and brush.

4. Toothbrush and toothpaste. Call it a symptom of always being on the road, but I forget a toothbrush and toothpaste a lot when I travel and it would be such a nice surprise to find a mini travel kit in my hotel room when I arrive. If airlines can do it in amenity kits – and I’m not just talking business and first class ones here, but some airlines offer it in economy as well – then hotels can provide a mini oral hygiene set to guests.

It is important to stay hydrated when you travel, and impossible to do without bottled water.

It is important to stay hydrated when you travel, and impossible to do without bottled water.

5. Free water bottles. It’s midnight. You’re off a really long flight. You’re parched. All the stores are closed. All you want is a bottle of water, especially if you’re in a place where the water might not be potable for you. Any water will do – it doesn’t have to be Evian – but your only choices are in the minibar and they each cost $10. Why is that? Hotels need to start offering guests two free water bottles per day (that’s the other thing – even if you get a couple free bottles, it’s a one-time thing with a lot of hotels – once you drink them that’s it!). We would all appreciate it, and it’s such a simple provision.

Sometimes the room service menu is hard to find.

Sometimes the room service menu is hard to find.

6. A room service menu that doesn’t take 20 clicks on the TV screen to navigate and order from. This is another old-fashioned quirk of mine, but as much as I love new technology, sometimes just having a paper menu and calling down to room service is just so much easier than trying to learn to navigate a hotel’s “state of the art” television ordering system. If you’re going to put such a system in place, put an iPad in my room and let me order from there, which is so much easier.

Blackout blinds

Blackout blinds in a hotel room are a must for a peaceful night.

7. Blackout drapes. While I appreciate a good fabric pattern as much as the next guy, when it comes to draperies, the one thing I’m unwilling to compromise on in a guest room is blackout drapes. Especially if you’ve flown overnight and arrive very early in the morning and need a few hours of sleep during daylight, blackout drapes can be a godsend to getting on the right time zone. Even if you’re not traveling far, sleeping in a new place can throw you off, so having a dark, undisturbed place to sleep is a good way to make sure you get the rest you need.

Decorative Pillows

Decorative pillows look pretty but can be unhygienic.

8. No decorative bed pillows. Every hotel room these days seems to be operating with a white-on-white palette…well, maybe with a shade of beige or taupe thrown in. Decorative pillows can be a nice way to add a splash of color to the room…but before you go plumping yours up, think about this: you can’t wash a decorative pillow. That’s right – those pillows have been sitting there since the day they were put in the room, and goodness knows how many germ-covered hands have handled them, if they’ve been thrown around the room or tossed on the floor, or what. So I wish hotels would just use washable decorative covers on their regular-size pillows and leave the little pillows to private homes.

Whether in a rack or a large closet, I need somewhere to put away my luggage.

Whether on a rack or in a large closet, I need somewhere to put away my luggage.

9. A decent luggage rack. It seems like it’s been a while since we were all bombarded with alarmist stories about bedbugs invading the major metropolises of the world – and I know I was obsessively checking my luggage and clothes for the little critters for a while there. These vermin are still a threat, so one thing I’d like to see in every room is a full-size luggage rack, preferably built into the closet. I can’t count how many times I’ve just had to put my suitcase on the floor, or just on a folding rack in the middle of the room when it should have been possible to make a shelf in the closet for my suitcase…all a safe distance away from any possible bedbug infestation.

Not enough coat hangers is a pet peeve.

Not enough coat hangers is a pet peeve.

10. Abundant hangers, and not those that don’t come off bar. I’m a bit of a clothes horse, and though I pack light (I’ve been known to make do with what I can fit in a carry on for trips as long as 3 weeks), I still like to bring some nice things along with me (especially on business trips) and I need to hang them up so they don’t get wrinkled, but it seems like every hotel has decided that they will only have approximately 4 hangers in the closet. Not only that, but some hangers these days don’t even come off the bar – like, at all – so I end up having to contort my clothes just to get them on in the first place. Hotels: I am not going to steal your old hangers anyway (how would I even pack them?) – just put a bunch more in and make sure they’re user-friendly!

Open plan bathrooms, such as this one at the W Hollywood, are not always a good thing.

Open plan bathrooms, such as this one at the W Hollywood, are not always a good thing.

11. A door to the bathroom that closes (I’m looking at you, W!). One of the biggest trends in hotel bathrooms for the past several years has been the peekaboo bathroom with only a window (sometimes with glass and sometimes without!) separating it from the main room, while other bathrooms don’t have actual closing doors. I don’t care how close you are to the person you’re sharing a room with, or even if you’re traveling alone, but you need a little separation and privacy. And for that matter, what’s with all the open showers with just a pane of glass separating them from the main bathroom rather than an enclosed space? The only thing that accomplishes is getting your floor all wet, and it doesn’t save much space. All I want is a private, dry bathroom to get clean and go about my business. Is that so much to ask?

Electronic "do not disturb" signs are a technological advance I like.

Electronic “do not disturb” signs are a technological advance I like.

12. Better Do Not Disturb Signs. We all like our privacy when we travel, and one of the simplest yet most integral parts of the hotel experience is that “do not disturb” sign. But how often have you found a tattered, frayed or ripped one hanging on your door? One minor innovation I love is the electronic DND sign where you can just hit a button and it illuminates a red light on your door that lets the staff know you want your privacy. Some hotels even have it bedside so you don’t have to pad to the door to light it up. And while we’re on the subject of signs, can we please get rid of the ones that have “do not disturb” on one side and “please make up my room” on the other? It’s so easy to hang the wrong side up and just as your falling asleep for a nap or getting dressed for dinner you get a knock on the door from housekeeping. No thank you!

Disclaimer: The responses below are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser's responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.

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  • Solène – I love travelling

    If only wi-fi could be free and WORKING in all hotels !!! This is the basic feature that so many hotels are lacking to have… Otherwise your list is quite complete :-) Thanks for this. Will share on twitter.

  • Paula

    Two features Hyatt Magnificent Mile in Chicagomhad that were thoughtful–at bottom of nightstands motion sensored lights so if you got up in middle of night you had discreet lighting at floor level. A box of disposable ear plugs.

  • RakSiam

    For me one of the biggest problems with hotel TV’s is this trend of having to navigate through 20 screens just to be able to watch TV

  • Jumus

    I agree with number 7. Happened to me too many times!!!

  • Love to Travel

    For me the biggest problem is lack of free wifi in the larger hotels. I was recently at the Rome Hilton (airport) – for goodness sakes … a business hotel and no free wifi in the rooms ($25 e per day). I could have it in the lobby, but 9 hours behind in California – 2 am is 5 pm so there I was in the lobby at 2 am on my own with my laptop sorting out the day’s problems.

  • pacheco18

    An in room safe. I will not stay in a hotel room that does not have one!!!

  • Andrew

    Just my opinion-
    Instead of doing stories like 12 things that should be in a hotel room, I’d rather see no content instead of lame stories like this. Less is more. You’re really saying there’s no news in the points world so I decided to go with this. Pretty poor read IMO. But hey – your site. Just my opinion.

  • Josh

    I find quality irons and a place to plug it in as a major issue. My clothes have been in a suitcase for hours and are bound to get wrinkled. I find many hotels, including upscale and luxury purchase cheap irons that are terrible.

  • shillz

    You chose to read it. Personally, I learned something, and learning something is not lame.

  • MRuby

    How about an Iron, steamer, or both? I like to make sure my shirts are pressed as soon as I get to the hotel for the week. Also, make sure the iron is one that uses water. I’ve been to a few that have super cheap irons, that don’t use water and it’s much harder to get the travel wrinkles out.

  • TimeTraveler999

    I agree with everything you listed, but I would like to weigh in on one of them. . Blackout drapes are a must, but even if they are there how many of us have to travel with binder clips to secure a proper overlap and closure. Hoteliers – Make sure the drapes do their intended job.

    In addition, how about an entry door that is closer to the floor so less light from the hall enters and illuminates the room (re: placing towels under the door). But if that is not possible, add a ‘sweeper’ to the base of door so as to still allow them to slide your bill under the door while preventing excess light from coming through

  • thepointsguy

    Agree.. but wifi is generally super expensive at business hotels, because they know business travelers get reimbursed (usually).

  • thepointsguy

    This site serves more than just the advanced points junkie. I like to have a mix of content- travel industry news/ points promotions/ my personal trip reports / my thoughts on travel (this post).. The site readership has more than doubled in the last year and has a far bigger audience than most of the other niche points blogs, so I don’t plan on narrowing the focus anytime soon. But appreciate the feedback!

  • thepointsguy

    Agree- and it is always so expensive to get them pressed by the hotel.. but I guess that’s why they don’t include a do-it-yourself steamer!

  • thepointsguy

    Yea- with ironing boards that are so creaky, they threaten to burst your earbuds when you unfold them!

  • thepointsguy

    Great one!

  • thepointsguy

    The key word being : WORKING! I agree- so annoying when the wifi works only in a certain area of the room. I hate when they don’t cover the bed, since I generally dislike working at a desk

  • thepointsguy

    Agree 100%

  • Jerry

    hahaha is Miles watching at you while being in the bathroom at W ? :p

    totally agree on all points, especially bottles of water, charging up to 5 bucks for a small bottle is totally insane

    Mercure and Sofitel are doing efforts to provide better amenities in some room categories, i hope this will be the same with all brands

  • Nick

    For me, I discovered on a recent business trip to the Grand Hyatt San Diego two things I missed that I wouldn’t have known I’d have missed: (1) a minibar (they give you a fridge, but nothing in it, and the warm bottle of water on the bedside table is $8) — for when you just need a Diet Coke [sorry, at this property the only option is Diet Pepsi, but still] or just a pick me up and (2) a robe. Two hotel staples that inexplicably were not factored into the brand new room re-design. (Though, to be fair, they did offer toothpaste and a toothbrush, an amenity I liked!)

  • Nick

    Oh, another one: the Parker Palm Springs (at least during warm-weather months) used to offer Peter Thomas Roth sunscreen among their bevy of amenities. Sadly– I think the sunscreen was recently dropped from the lineup. But I’d love to see resort hotels, especially expensive resort hotels, offer little tubes of sunblock with the shampoo, conditioner, body wash and body lotion. (Also: does anyone every actually use the body lotion?)

  • WS

    Andrew, besides points, these peripheral issues faced by frequent travelers should be brought to the attention of the hotel chains. TPG has the ear of the industry so I appreciate that he’s trying to keep them on their toes.

  • WS

    You hit everything on my wish list except one: more bathroom counter space. Some hotels are wonderful. Others have a small vanity with only enough room to display their cleverly packaged soaps and rolled towels. If I’m in a room for more than one night I unpack everything and I’d rather not feel like I’m encroaching on their space when I do it. Thanks for the article!

  • Stvr

    Most hotels do offer potable water… It’s called a sink! Water bottles are SO wasteful… Please don’t perpetuate the myth that they somehow provide a more potable option.

  • Ben L

    Just stayed in the Radisson Blu Plaza in Helsinki this weekend. They have these backlit room numbers in the floor in front of each room. At the touch of a DND button, it turns from blue to red. Awesome.

  • Marc

    Agree 100%! Bottled water is such a waste. I just drink out of the tap now when I’m at hotels.

  • Jesse Helms

    Great list, TPG! Can’t agree more.

  • Steve

    I too agree. I’m glad to see some people choosing this option, but am dismayed that even at home so many people drink bottled water.

  • FlyingJoey

    As someone who travels frequently I have learned not to EVER trust the water… Doesn’t matter where you go. The last thing you need is to get sick while you’re away from home. Good for you if you have a strong stomach, but not everyone is like you.

  • Melissa Hogan

    I’m going to expand on 2. and say that in the name of all things holy, please include some real milk or cream. Those little plastic cups will do. I detest CoffeeMate in my tea but often it’s the only choice in a hotel room.

  • Jeff

    Excellent point about dark coloured mini hotel cushions/pillows.

  • Ben

    Some hotel irons have left marks on my clothing

  • Playerx

    Celsius shall be the standard temperature unit everywhere, including America !

  • Speed

    Great list! If the hotels are reading this I’d like to add one caveat to the MORE PLUGS item. We need more plugs that work. I cannot count how many wobbly outlets I have encountered that have lost all of their spring tension through overuse and will not hold a plug in place. You have to assemble a Jinga-ish support structure of pens and menus to support the plug in just the right position. This is quickly closing in on my #1 travel pet peeve…. people standing on moving sidewalks and blocking passage still holding the top spot!!!

  • emak

    Lens Solution!!!! with lens case

  • Andrew

    You’re right, I did to read it. Thank you for pointing that out. Not sure why you felt it was necessary considering I read it.

    I’m curious… What did you learn from this post? You learned what someone likes to see in their room??? Wow! In other words, if TPG was staying a boutique hotel who setup guest rooms to guests exact preferences this is how TPG would ask to have his room setup. Look on the bright side – if you and TPG ever shared a room you would know exactly what he wants in his room and “Top 12 things that should be in every hotel room.”

    So you learned something from the post? I did too. I learned that TPG would rather have a nice “Do Not Disturb Sign” rather then an in room safe…ARE YOU SERIOUS….. TPG goes on and on about his jetsetting lifestyle to all corners of the globe. We all know how many credit cards he carries – he so eloquently points that out ever so often. So I can only surmise that TPG always carries his passport, all his 20+ credit cards with him, other travel related documents, his laptop and other important business tools and financial instruments. He doesn’t think a room needs a safe so these items are obviously not in the safe… LOL.

    Some of the things on his list are totally right on and he makes some great points. However, some of the other items are stretches. I think his list is incomplete. How do you not think a safe and hairdryer should be in every room. But yet he’s concerned with the do not disturb signs, the on screen in room dining? Like really? I travel all the time – just as much if not more then TPG and I have never stayed in a hotel where there isn’t an actual menu on paper that I refer to for the menu options. Toothbrush and Toothpaste – I just couldn’t disagree more. Most hotels have a housekeeping department that could supply to a guest if requested. To put in every room is really silly. Do we really want that cost pushed off to us and also, who forgets that when putting together their toiletry kit? TPG you forget these items a lot? Learn to pack better – I would expect you to have packing down to a science by now given how often you travel. Also, don’t totally agree with the water bottles but I certainly agree with that a lot more then not having a safe or a hairdryer.

    As I maintained the whole time, just my opinion.

  • thepointsguy

    As written in the post, this is obviously not a list of every necessity- basics like a safe and toilet paper were excluded.

    Thanks for sharing your opinion- hope you pack a more positive attitude when you travel ;-)

  • Dee

    Did you ask for a robe? Most Hyatts I’ve stayed in have a list of items they will supply in case you forget them or want to borrow them. http://www.experience.hyatt.com/#hyatt-has-it

  • Darren

    I’m currently at the Royal Hawaiian (with great upgrades due to Amex FHR), and my room is nearly perfect. However, I think hotels need to go back to using incandescent lighting for their bathrooms. I know that fluorescent lighting is both cost and energy efficient, but no one looks good with fluorescent lighting, especially after a day at the beach! Only fish in aquariums look great under fluorescent lighting…

  • Andrew

    You’re right, I did read it. Thank you for pointing that out. Not sure why you felt it was necessary considering I acknowledging reading it.

    I’m curious… What did you learn from this post? You learned what someone likes to see in their room??? Wow! In other words, if TPG was staying a
    boutique hotel who setup guest rooms to guests exact preferences this is how TPG would ask to have his room setup and all the items he would want in his room. Look on the bright side – if you and TPG ever shared a room you would know exactly what he wants in
    his room and “Top 12 things that should be in every hotel room.”

    So you learned something from the post? I did too. I learned that TPG would rather have a nice “Do Not Disturb Sign” rather then an in room safe…ARE YOU SERIOUS….. TPG goes on and on about his jetsetting
    lifestyle to all corners of the globe. We all know how many credit cards he carries – he so eloquently points that out ever so often. So I can only surmise that TPG always carries his passport, all his 20+ credit cards with him, other travel related documents, his laptop and other
    important business tools and financial instruments on his person when not in the room. He doesn’t think a room needs a safe so these items are obviously not in the safe… LOL.

    Some of the things on his list are totally right on and he makes some great points. However, some of the other items are stretches. I think his list is incomplete. How do you not think a safe and hairdryer should be in
    every room. We need toothbrush and toothpaste over a hairdryer??? Seriously… I know you don’t have a girlfriend or wife but perhaps be a bit more empathetic to what woman travelers would want in their room. You’re concerned with the do not disturb signs, the on screen in room dining? Like really? I travel all the time – just as much if not more then TPG and I have never stayed in a hotel where there isn’t an actual menu on paper that I refer to for the menu options. Toothbrush and Toothpaste – I just couldn’t disagree more. Most hotels have a housekeeping department that could supply to a guest if requested by the guest. To put one in every room is absurd, certainly not a cost I want factored into my room rate for those who forget to pack the essentials. Do we really want that cost pushed off to us. Furthermore, who forgets that when putting together their toiletry kit? TPG you forget these items a lot? Kinda weird you admitted that. Learn to pack better – I would expect you to have packing down to a science by now given how often you travel. Also, don’t totally agree with the water bottles but I certainly agree with that a lot more then not having a safe or a hairdryer.

    As I maintained the whole time, just my opinion.

  • Andrew

    Oh ok I see… Are you sure you just didn’t forget about the safe? I’m well aware of the essentials… Just doesn’t make a lot of sense you want a toothbrush but no hairdryer… So we are to assume you assumed a hairdryer would be in the room…

    It’s so nice to see you replying to my comments now, yet when I wrote you an email with a really basic question about a travel recommendation you had one of your employees send me a generic response to PointsPros or whatever. I appreciate you taking the time to defend your little blog yet you can’t take 2 seconds and help out when I had a question…As i said… Lame…

  • JB

    Love articles like this. Your list is pretty complete and fortunately since switching to Hyatt, many of them offer most of this. However one thing I would love to see added at other places that Starwood and Hyatt both all seem to have is the entertainment jack. My wife and I are on the road for close to a third of the year. Bringing our entertainment (TVs and Movies) on our WD Live TV Hub is a must. Turning off HDMI jacks and menu options is absurd in this day and age regardless if you are trying to sell media of your own.

    Love the Nespresso idea. As a user I would love to see more of them.

  • Andrew

    he does? oh. how do u know this?

  • Fanfoot

    The one nice thing about this is that usually there is now a channel guide, meaning I can get to “CBS” without having to find a piece of paper that probably isn’t there. That said, stay at a Hyatt House if this is your problem.

  • Fanfoot

    Agree with all of this though to varying degrees. For me the lack of outlets is the biggest and most glaring problem that needs to be dealt with by most hotels. Seriously, I have to pull the bed away from the wall to find the one extension cord you plugged things into? Generally the only guaranteed outlet is the one for the electric shaver in the bathroom right next to the sink?

    I’ve taken to carrying a 20-foot USB extension cable as a result of this after reading a Gizmodo article suggesting this approach…

  • BT

    I can’t speak for shillz, but I know I read this blog (and many others!) for entertainment purposes. I enjoy Brian’s style of writing, so I enjoyed reading this article, even though, as you say, I didn’t really learn anything from it. For me, that’s okay.

  • Andrew

    Hotels and resorts don’t give out sunscreen to make sure they don’t get sued. In the day of frivolous lawsuits and suing anyone for anything this is something I think all hotels have adapted. It doesn’t mean employees haven’t given sunscreen to a guest but the hotel doesn’t want this happening. It goes like this. A guest asks for sunscreen from the 19 year old pool boy who doesn’t know the policy or if there even is a policy. The staff has some sunscreen they use at the pool and he agrees to let the guest use is. Guest puts it on, 1 day later after she checks out she has a 3rd degree burn, rash, whatever and is threatening the hotel with a lawsuit.

    I have worked for Ritz Carlton, St.Regis and Montage Resorts and each company doesn’t provide sunscreen to their guests for this very reason. Like I said, I’m sure you can get the pool attendant to give you some for a tip – but pool attendants, pool staff, pool servers etc are those who should be strictly enforcing not giving sunscreen to the guest. At Montage and Ritz it was a write up if employees at the pool broke this rule.

  • Nick

    Generally speaking, you only really want a robe when you need a robe. Would that I had had the foresight to check the closet first before stepping into the shower, but I’ve never not seen a closet with robes at a nice Hyatt property.

  • NMS

    Plugs! Yes!
    More plugs.
    And not just for our electronic “toys” but I have to use a CPAP. I always carry an extension cord but have great difficulty when the only plug is behind the bed.
    Recently in Las Vegas we stayed one night at a hotel for $53. The bedside lamps had two plugs each at their base. I loved that!
    Then we moved to the Strip and an upscale hotel.
    The plugs, while reachable, were on the wall under the nightstand.
    I’m getting too old for this! :)

  • Andrew

    25 Euro a day. About $33 us. Invest in a hotspot on your phone to send signal to laptop or procure your own cable modem internet device. Airport hotels – almost guaranteed to be charged. Amazes me people such as yourself still complain with all the alternatives these days to procuring internet access. You’re in Rome, on Business presumably (as you had “to check the days problems.” Just would think you more aware of the industry norms and besides you “love to travel.” Sounds like its time for you to invest in a hotspot.

  • Andrew

    Me too. I usually enjoy the site. Not sure what one could have learned from that post. I personally learned TPG and my opinion of things that must be in a room differ- items such as a safe and a hair dryer and showercap. I know he doesn’t have a wife or a girlfriend but perhaps a little empathy into a woman’s travel needs could go a long way for his readers.

  • Snorri

    Hot diggity Andrew! Is TPG paid by you? Is he obligated to answer all your questions or deal with your petty attitude? I have no interest in points but I have followed him on Twitter and this blog since he stayed in my hotel and slammed it on Instagram and Twitter respectively. I like to learn from such things and put it to good use. I value his opinions and I like to see the opinions of frequent travelers. So he forgot or does not value hairdryers as much as you. What a monster! Why don´t you start your own blog that includes all information for all readers and is universally loved with no personal opinions?

  • smoinpour

    Those are all good ideas, and some free wifi would also be nice

  • Matt P

    I actually like the glass wall, no door, type of shower. Most of the time they don’t get the floor wet, they look nifty, and you don’t have to fuss with a rickety glass door that doesn’t fit properly in its frame. Now, if the only thing separating the shower from the rest of the hotel room is a glass partition, then it would certainly make showering while sharing the room with friends an awkward situation.

  • Andrew

    Snorri – is that a real name? Thank you for your questions. All really good stuff. Your the man Snor Snor Snorri!

  • BobChi

    I agree 95%. There are some places where it truly isn’t safe to drink tap water.

  • Tim

    How about consistent WORKING A/C that DOESN’T shut off in the middle of the night due to a pre-programmed setting or a motion sensor?

  • thepointsguy

    Yes.. or one that doesn’t sound like a 747!

  • thepointsguy

    I’m not worried about Miles- he’s seen a lot! But when traveling with (human) family and friends, having an open bathroom can be awkward

  • Janice Chaka PHR

    Slightly off topic but I would love to see more hotels where you can check in at any time and get a room for 24 hours. I am tired of having a flight that gets in at 6 am and trying to figure out what to do while I wait for my 2 or 3 pm check in.

  • Chad

    How about an ironing board. On a long trip sometimes you have to recycle an already worn short and won’t realize how obnoxious it is not to have an iron in the room. Ahem, Radisson Blu.

  • Snorri

    Yup. It’s Icelandic and means “uncontrolable” kind of like you ;)

  • Farhan

    All of these concerns will be solved. Once you have stayed at a Rotana Hotel. Their properties are in the Middle East and Africa. Their hospitality is top notch. I wish they would start coming to the US so they blow the competition.

  • Helen

    I agree with all of this. I would add BETTER HAIR DRYERS. Not as important for men, but at all the luxury hotels I’ve stayed in (from the W’s to other “6 star” resorts), they all have horrible cheap hair dryers. If you really were a 5 start resort, get an amazing hair dyer with iconic technology.

  • dadamn

    I’d add a basic dresser with a couple drawers to the list. As I travel extremely light, my travel pack typically does double duty as my day pack, which means i need a place to store my clothes. Too often I have to resort to just leaving my fresh laundry on whatever small “desk” is in the room and dirty laundry on the opposite end.

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