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They thought they would be able to rebook their flights from Mexico back to Minneapolis (MSP) after they’d been canceled on Saturday due to snowy weather.

But, hundreds of Minnesota travelers booked on Sun Country Airlines ended up stranded in Los Cabos, Mexico (SJD), after the carrier’s flights to and from the region ended for the season. When passengers tried to rebook online, they found the next available flights on the airline were not until the end of June.

Passengers trying to contact the airline were disconnected or found its phone lines were jammed, and no employees were staffing the carrier’s counters at the Los Cabos Airport (SJD), according The Minneapolis Star-Tribune,

Sun Country told the travelers it “did not have another flight to re-accommodate passengers on.” Apologizing for the inconvenience, the airline gave passengers a full refund and told them to rebook on another carrier. “As disruptive as the current situation is for the affected passengers, the alternative — canceling other flights to other destinations — would have been more disruptive to even more passengers,” Kelsey Dodson-Smith, Sun Country’s vice president of Marketing told the Star-Tribune.

One family ended up rebooking on a United flight to Chicago and had to rent a car to drive the rest of the way to Minneapolis. They spent $2,000 rebooking the return leg of the trip, about half as much as their entire vacation — and that was probably their most direct option. A flight to Minneapolis (MSP) would have been $709 per person and — with stops in Mexico City and Atlanta — taken 26 hours.

Emily Kladivo, the travel agent who helped rebook that stranded family, said she has never experienced anything like this situation before and called the Minnesota-based airline’s response “ridiculous.” “Weather is out of their control; how they’re handling the situation is IN their control,” Kladivo said. “Send a plane, go get your passengers.”

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