It’s Almost Peak Wildflower Season at Mount Rainier National Park

Jun 26, 2019

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If you didn’t get your fill of wildflower excitement this year from the Texas and California super blooms, fear not.

Mount Rainier National Park, which is about a two-hour drive south from Seattle, Washington, is about to enter peak wildflower season.

From mid-July to the beginning of August, a colorful display comprising hundreds of different wildflower species is expected to blanket the national park. There will be lupine, Jeffrey’s shooting star, wild strawberries, Calypso orchids, yellow violets, starflower plants, salmonberries and a plethora of other wildflower varieties blooming across the sprawling 369-square-mile expanse of the Washington State reserve.

Wildflowers in meadow and view to Tatoosh Range from Skyline Trail in Paradise area; Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. (Photo by: Greg Vaughn /VW PICS/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)
Wildflowers in meadow and view to Tatoosh Range from Skyline Trail in Paradise area; Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. (Photo by: Greg Vaughn /VW PICS/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

According to Travel + Leisure, there are dozens of trails open for optimal flower viewing. Some of these include the Bench and Snow Lakes Trail, the Naches Peak Loop Trail, the Glacier Basin Trail and the Wonderland Trail — where impressive flower sitings have already been reported.

Park representatives also said that the subalpine regions will host the park’s most “impressive wildflower displays.” This is due to snow that lingers on the meadows into June and even July, which causes the flowers to “bloom profusely” in that area. Officials also noted that, while frost tends to appear in the area in late August, flowers could look even more mesmerizing with a light layer of ice as the leaves change and the bloom continues.

When visiting, park guests are asked to stay on established trails to avoid damaging the flower fields and help preserve the natural phenomenon. Earlier this year in California, law enforcement officials were forced to “close everything” in response to super bloom-seekers crushing the flowers by walking off the trails and straying from designated viewing spots to take photos.

Featured image by Prisma Bildagentur/Universal Images Group via Getty Images.

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