Skip to content

JetBlue cuts a whopping 27 routes in sweeping network update

June 14, 2021
6 min read
This post contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. Terms apply to the offers listed on this page. For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page.

JetBlue’s route map is getting a pandemic-era shake-up.

Over the weekend, the New York-based carrier filed a slew of cuts beginning this fall, per Cirium schedules. The majority of the cuts are on routes that were added during the pandemic, a development that comes JetBlue begins seeing "more expected booking patterns."

The carrier confirmed the move on Monday to TPG, with a full statement below.

With travelers returning to the skies, we’re getting a clearer picture of where demand is strongest. JetBlue-operated flying (as measured by available seat miles [ASMs]) is expected to increase by 3% over 2019 in October and includes some 40 new routes set to launch in the coming months – many enabled by our successful Northeast Alliance with American Airlines.
As our Customers return to more expected booking patterns, we are looking at how we adjust our schedule and focus on continuing growth that furthers our network strategy. Beginning this fall, we plan to adjust our flying on some of the routes we launched in the pandemic, so we can re-deploy those aircraft into our focus city growth.

You’ll find the full list of cuts at the bottom of this post, but let’s dive into some of the most notable changes.

Want more airline-specific news? Sign up for TPG’s free new biweekly Aviation newsletter!

Leisure-focused Florida flights get axed

Perhaps the biggest theme among JetBlue's far-reaching cuts is the pullback across Florida: 17 of the 27 route cuts are for flights to or from the Sunshine State.

Most of the routes were added during the pandemic to capture demand among leisure travelers looking for an outdoor-friendly escape, including flights from Philadelphia (PHL) to Fort Myers (RSW), Orlando (MCO), Tampa (TPA) and West Palm Beach (PBI), among others.

Now, however, as travel recovers and airlines expect business travel to ramp up soon, JetBlue says that it's going to redeploy its aircraft to growing its focus cities.

While leisure travel will likely still remain core to JetBlue's network strategy, the carrier isn't going to be chasing that demand in the same way that it did during the pandemic, when it had spare planes and crews available.

Sign up for our daily newsletter

Raleigh-Durham gets a big cut

During the pandemic, JetBlue launched numerous routes from Raleigh-Durham (RDU), due to increased demand among leisure travelers.

Despite the leisure-focused strategy, the carrier's RDU growth also had a competitive angle — going up against Delta in one of its focus cities.

Well, JetBlue's throwing in the towel on eight of its RDU routes. Many will still be operated by Delta, along with other competitors like Frontier and United.

Despite the cuts, RDU will still be a large outstation for JetBlue, with seven routes to many of its largest airports, including:

  • Boston (BOS)
  • Cancun (CUN)
  • Newark (EWR)
  • Fort Lauderdale (FLL)
  • New York-JFK
  • Los Angeles (LAX)
  • San Juan (SJU)

JetBlue cuts Austin, while AA boosts it

JetBlue is cutting three Austin (AUS) routes, two of which it launched during the pandemic, including flights to RDU and San Francisco (SFO). Service from AUS to Orlando (MCO) first started in May 2008, but will now end in June 2021.

The move to pare down flights to Austin comes just days after its newest partner, American Airlines, announced a major expansion in the city, with 14 new domestic and international routes launching in the coming months.

However, while American and JetBlue now codeshare in the Northeast, they aren't allowed to coordinate schedules in other markets —like the ones that JetBlue just cut in Austin. So, despite AA's renewed focus on Austin, JetBlue seemingly doesn't see the same level of demand to warrant continuing three of its Austin flights.

JetBlue's new Airbus A220 will soon start flying to Austin (Photo by Zach Griff/The Points Guy)

Despite the cuts, one of JetBlue's Austin flights is getting a notable boost — the carrier's Boston (BOS) flight will soon be operated by the carrier's new, swanky Airbus A220.

Pittsburgh getting pulled down

JetBlue is going to be smaller in Pittsburgh with its latest cuts. Flights to both Fort Lauderdale (FLL) and West Palm Beach (PBI) are getting axed, leaving the city served exclusively from JetBlue's focus city in Boston (BOS).

The FLL route first started in October 2014, while the PBI service was a pandemic-era play that first flew in December 2020, per Cirium schedules.

Cutting down Pittsburgh comes as the competition heats up in the city. Breeze Airways, America's newest airline, launched last month, and its first tranche of routes includes four to Pittsburgh.

Full list of JetBlue route cuts

You'll find the full list of JetBlue route cuts below, based on Cirium schedules and confirmed by the carrier.

OriginDestinationNotes
Austin (AUS)Orlando (MCO)
Austin (AUS)Raleigh-Durham (RDU)
Austin (AUS)San Francisco (SFO)
Boston (BOS)Burbank (BUR)
Boston (BOS)San Jose (SJC)Cut from October 2021 through April 2022
Fort Myers (RSW)Cleveland (CLE)
Los Angeles (LAX)Seattle (SEA)Cut from October 2021 through April 2022
Orlando (MCO)Atlanta (ATL)
Orlando (MCO)Bogota (BOG)Will only operate during peak holiday season in December and January
Orlando (MCO)Philadelphia (PHL)
Orlando (MCO)Raleigh-Durham (RDU)
Orlando (MCO)San Francisco (SFO)
Philadelphia (PHL)Fort Myers (RSW)
Philadelphia (PHL)Tampa (TPA)
Pittsburgh (PIT)Fort Lauderdale (FLL)
Pittsburgh (PIT)West Palm Beach (PBI)
Raleigh-Durham (RDU)Fort Myers (RSW)
Raleigh-Durham (RDU)Jacksonville (JAX)
Raleigh-Durham (RDU)Las Vegas (LAS)
Raleigh-Durham (RDU)Montego Bay, Jamaica (MBJ)
Raleigh-Durham (RDU)San Francisco (SFO)
Raleigh-Durham (RDU)Tampa (TPA)
Richmond (RIC)Las Vegas (LAS)
Richmond (RIC)Los Angeles (LAX)Cut from October 2021 through April 2022
Tampa (TPA)Washington/National (DCA)
West Palm Beach (PBI)Chicago (ORD)
West Palm Beach (PBI)Philadelphia (PHL)
Featured image by (Photo by Zach Griff/The Points Guy)
Editorial disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airline or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Top offers from our partners

How we chose these cards

Our points-obsessed staff uses a plethora of credit cards on a daily basis. If anyone on our team wouldn’t recommend it to a friend or a family member, we wouldn’t recommend it on The Points Guy either. Our opinions are our own, and have not been reviewed, approved, or endorsed by our advertising partners.
See all best card offers

TPG featured card

BEST FOR DINING AND GROCERY REWARDS
TPG Editor‘s Rating
Card Rating is based on the opinion of TPG‘s editors and is not influenced by the card issuer.
4 / 5
Go to review
Apply for American Express® Gold Card
at American Express's secure site

Rewards

3 - 4X points
4XEarn 4X Membership Rewards® Points on Restaurants worldwide, including takeout and delivery.
4XEarn 4X Membership Rewards® points at U.S. supermarkets (on up to $25,000 per calendar year in purchases, then 1X).
3XEarn 3X Membership Rewards® points on flights booked directly with airlines or on amextravel.com.

Intro offer

Earn 60,000 points
Earn 60,000 Membership Rewards® points after you spend $4,000 on eligible purchases with your new Card within the first 6 months.

Annual Fee

$250

Recommended Credit

670-850
Excellent/Good
Credit ranges are a variation of FICO© Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.

Why We Chose It

There’s a lot to love about the Amex Gold card. It’s been a fan favorite during the pandemic because of its fantastic rewards rate on restaurants (that includes takeout and delivery in the U.S.!) and U.S. supermarkets. If you’re hitting the skies soon, you’ll also earn bonus points on travel. Paired with up to $120 in Uber Cash (for U.S. Uber rides or Uber Eats orders) and up to $120 in annual dining statement credits at eligible partners, there’s no reason that the foodie shouldn’t add this card to their wallet. Enrollment required.

Pros

  • 4x on dining at restaurants and U.S. supermarkets (on the first $25,000 in purchases per calendar year; then 1x).
  • 3x on flights booked directly with the airline or with Amex Travel.
  • Welcome bonus of 60,000 points after spending $4,000 in the first six months.

Cons

  • Weak on travel outside of flights and everyday spending bonus categories.
  • Not as useful for those living outside the U.S.
  • Some may have trouble using Uber/food credits.
  • Few travel perks and protections.
Apply for American Express® Gold Card
at American Express's secure site
Terms & restrictions apply. See rates & fees
BEST FOR DINING AND GROCERY REWARDS
TPG Editor‘s Rating
Card Rating is based on the opinion of TPG‘s editors and is not influenced by the card issuer.
4 / 5
Go to review

Rewards Rate

4XEarn 4X Membership Rewards® Points on Restaurants worldwide, including takeout and delivery.
4XEarn 4X Membership Rewards® points at U.S. supermarkets (on up to $25,000 per calendar year in purchases, then 1X).
3XEarn 3X Membership Rewards® points on flights booked directly with airlines or on amextravel.com.
  • Intro Offer
    Earn 60,000 Membership Rewards® points after you spend $4,000 on eligible purchases with your new Card within the first 6 months.

    Earn 60,000 points
  • Annual Fee

    $250
  • Recommended Credit
    Credit ranges are a variation of FICO© Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.

    670-850
    Excellent/Good

Why We Chose It

There’s a lot to love about the Amex Gold card. It’s been a fan favorite during the pandemic because of its fantastic rewards rate on restaurants (that includes takeout and delivery in the U.S.!) and U.S. supermarkets. If you’re hitting the skies soon, you’ll also earn bonus points on travel. Paired with up to $120 in Uber Cash (for U.S. Uber rides or Uber Eats orders) and up to $120 in annual dining statement credits at eligible partners, there’s no reason that the foodie shouldn’t add this card to their wallet. Enrollment required.

Pros

  • 4x on dining at restaurants and U.S. supermarkets (on the first $25,000 in purchases per calendar year; then 1x).
  • 3x on flights booked directly with the airline or with Amex Travel.
  • Welcome bonus of 60,000 points after spending $4,000 in the first six months.

Cons

  • Weak on travel outside of flights and everyday spending bonus categories.
  • Not as useful for those living outside the U.S.
  • Some may have trouble using Uber/food credits.
  • Few travel perks and protections.