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One of Arizona’s most famous overlooks is no longer free for gawking. Effective immediately, the city of Page has instituted a “parking fee” to stop to see — and photograph — Horseshoe Bend, a landmark in the American southwest and part of the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Parking fees are $10 per car and $5 per motorcycle, while commercial vans or buses are $35 (up to 14 passengers), $70 (up to 35 passengers), and $140 (over 35 passengers).

Horseshoe Bend in Arizona
Not pictured: hundreds of other tourists taking almost the exact same photo of Horseshoe Bend in Arizona

For those road-tripping from Grand Canyon National Park‘s north rim to Monument Valley, pausing in the area surrounding Antelope Canyon has long been a must. In the age of Instagram, what was always a photogenic (and easy to reach) spot has drawn added fame and crowds. Park administrators and the City of Page say that “monies collected will be utilized for future improvements at the site,” but details are slim.

Worse, National Park Service passes are not valid, as the parking lot is managed by the city of Page, not the park service.

The pathway which leads to the overlook from the parking lot is on public land, with the portion of the new American Disability Act (ADA) trail closest to the rim opening for use earlier this month. Horseshoe Bend will not be fully ADA accessible until the portion of the trail from the parking lot is completed. Per the National Park Service, construction continues on the remainder of the trail “which will include two shade shelters and connect the new parking lot to the rim.”

Horseshoe Bend in Arizona
The sun glistens as the Colorado River meanders around Horseshoe Bend

Leveraging social media to make the most of your travels was a recent topic on our Miles Away podcast. While the power of Instagram is great for finding locales that have remained best-kept secrets, it’s also chipping away at the number of places left untouched by influencers.

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All photos by Darren Murph / TPG.

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