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Hackers Sell Access to Airport Security System for Just $10

July 11, 2018
2 min read
Hackers Sell Access to Airport Security System for Just $10
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Researchers at McAfee's Advanced Threat Research team uncovered a marketplace where hackers were selling access to a large international airport's computer and security system for as little as $10.

The team found that stolen log-in credentials, being sold on a Russian dark website, were for the airport's remote desktop protocol (RDP), which allows employees to log in to the airport's computers from a remote location.

After more investigation, McAfee tracked the log in credentials being sold to an IP address of what was believed to be a major international airport. They confirmed with the airport, that yes, those were its RDP credentials and could access “systems linked to security and building automation systems.”

Although McAfee's blog post doesn't reveal which airport was hacked for security reasons, it says it was located within the US. The airport resolved the issue after McAfee notified it of the intrusion.

McAfee isn't positive on how the credentials were found, but it thinks the hackers used the "brute-force" method where they continually guessed random passwords until they found the correct one. According to McAfee, brute-force is a common way for hackers to gain access to RDP systems.

McAfee said hackers could have access to "accounts associated with two companies specializing in airport security; one in security and building automation, the other in camera surveillance and video analytics." Adding that once they were in the system "a compromise could offer a great foothold and lateral movement through the network using tools such as Mimikatz."

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It added a third compromised account is "most likely associated with the airport’s automated transit system, the passenger transport system that connects terminals." This suggests that the hackers could have possibly affected a system like JFK or SFO's Airtrain and have even gained access to more areas of the airport's computer network, including its security systems.

H/T: The Verge

Featured image by Getty Images/Cultura RF

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