This post contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announced Tuesday that it will require additional, more stringent inspection of fan blades in engines that are similar to the one that exploded on Boeing 737-700 Southwest Flight 1380.

An “unsafe condition exists that requires the immediate adoption” of the rule, the FAA said without further elaboration.

The new inspection requirements follow an emergency airworthiness directive (AD) issued by the FAA and by European regulators after Southwest’s deadly incident, which called for the inspection of nearly 700 CFM56-7B engines on Boeing 737-700s worldwide. The initial directive called for ultrasonic inspections on fan blades that have been used in more than 30,000 cycles, or in service for about 20 years, within 20 days of the emergency AD issuance.

Tuesday, the FAA expanded the inspection requirements to encompass an additional 3,716 CFM56-7B engines on US-registered aircraft. Under the new directive, the “concave and convex sides” of some fan blades within these engines must be inspected by August 31 or before the blades accumulate 20,000 cycles, according to the order. Some of the engines within this group have already been inspected under the previous directive, but must undergo inspection again.

According to the FAA, the safety precautions are to prevent another Flight 1380 situation, where a fan blade that broke off the plane’s engine shattered a window, killing a passenger from the cabin depressurization that followed.

The CFM56 engines are manufactured by CFM in US and European factories, which is under joint ownership by General Electric as well as France’s Safran.

*Correction: A previous version of this story referenced the aircraft as a 737-300. It has been updated to reflect the correct aircraft, a 737-700.

Featured photo courtesy of the National Transportation Safety Board via the Associated Press.

The Business Platinum® Card from American Express OPEN

LIMITED TIME OFFER. Aside from the 100,000 points welcome bonus (available until 8/8/18), Amex recently made huge improvements to the Business Platinum Card, including the fact that you will now earn 50% more points on purchases of $5,000 or more, earn 5x on flights and eligible hotels at Amextravel.com and cardholders will receive a $200 airline fee credit each year.

Apply Now
More Things to Know
  • Limited Time Offer: Earn up to 100,000 Membership Rewards® Points.
  • Earn 50,000 Membership Rewards® points after you spend $10,000 & an extra 50,000 points after you spend an additional $15,000 all on qualifying purchases within your first 3 months of Card Membership. Offer ends 8/8/18.†
  • Get 5X Membership Rewards® points on flights and prepaid hotels on amextravel.com.
  • Get 50% more Membership Rewards® points. That's 1.5 points per dollar, on each eligible purchase of $5,000 or more. You can get up to 1 million additional points per year.
  • 35% Airline Bonus: Use Membership Rewards® Pay with Points for all or part of a flight with your selected qualifying airline, and you can get 35% of the points back, up to 500,000 bonus points per calendar year.
  • You can also receive 35% points back on all First and Business class flights, with all airlines available through American Express Travel.
  • You can enjoy access to The American Express Global Lounge Collection℠ offering access to the most lounges across the globe, when compared with other U.S. credit card offerings. As of 11/2017
  • Terms Apply
  • See Rates & Fees
Intro APR on Purchases
N/A
Regular APR
N/A
Annual Fee
$450
Balance Transfer Fee
See Terms
Recommended Credit
Excellent Credit
Terms and restrictions apply. See rates & fees.

Editorial Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Disclaimer: The responses below are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser’s responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.