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Smoking Engine Forces Delta Flight to Make Emergency Landing

April 19, 2018
2 min read
Smoking Engine Forces Delta Flight to Make Emergency Landing
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A Delta Air Lines flight made an emergency landing on Wednesday after smoke could be seen coming out of its right engine.

Delta Flight 30, from Atlanta (ATL) to London (LHR), returned to ATL shortly after takeoff after experiencing "an issue with its No. 2 engine." The A330-300 — registration N822NW — departed from ATL at 6:08pm before circling around the airport for nearly 30 minutes and landing at 6:34pm.

Upon its arrival at ATL, the aircraft was met by emergency crews. Fire crews could be seen hosing down the engine on the tarmac. N822NW is just three years old, having been delivered new from the Airbus factory to Delta in May 2015, according to Planespotters.net. It's equipped with the latest version of the General Electric CF6 engine, which is also found on many other Airbus and Boeing airplanes, including Air Force One.

The Atlanta Airport said that there were no reports of injuries and minimal impact to operations.

"The flight landed without incident and airport response vehicles met the aircraft upon arrival," Delta said in a statement. "The airplane was towed to the gate, where customers deplaned through the jetway and will be accommodated on a different aircraft. The safety of our customers and crew is always our top priority and we apologize to our customers on this flight."

The incident comes just days after a Southwest Airlines flight made an emergency landing at Philadelphia (PHL) after an explosion in the left engine, causing shrapnel to shatter a window. One passenger, Jennifer Riordan, was partially sucked out of the window and eventually died from her injuries. Preliminary NTSB findings show that the engine showed metal fatigue, and parts of the engine cowling were discovered in Pennsylvania.

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