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It’s a familiar story: couple goes on honeymoon, couple celebrates with a few too many drinks, couple ends up with a hilarious-but-not-detrimental story to tell their family once they return. Except, this story doesn’t quite fit that mold.

Gina Lyons and Mark Lee, from London, set off to Sri Lanka to enjoy a blissful honeymoon after vowing their undying love to each other. During the three-week adventure, they found themselves in quite the pickle after consuming a nontrivial amount of rum. With too much alcohol comes a reduction in logic, and what began as a harmless question ended in a contract: They agreed to purchase the place they were honeymooning.

They discovered that the lease was nearly up on the small hotel that they had fallen head over heels for, and in a fit of “Wouldn’t it be great if we canceled our return flight and stayed here forever?!” they actually pulled the trigger. Following a series of translated, drunken conversations, they agreed to pick up the lease for the next three years, which worked out to around $13,200 per annum. Granted, that’s a pretty small sum compared to what you’d pay in London for a bantam apartment, but owning a hotel comes with a lot of other responsibilities.

“Our friends and family think we’re idiots and shouldn’t have been doing it — we owed a lot of money from the wedding and only lived in a tiny flat, and now we have a baby on the way,” said Lyons.

Tangalle
Peering down at the coastal town of Tangalle, Sri Lanka. (Photo courtesy of Lucky Beach Tangalle)

Unflapped, the couple decided to go all-in on the decision, investing $8,000 into renovations and reopening the place as a seven-bedroom bed and breakfast. Lucky Beach Tangalle welcomed its first visitors in July, and so far it appears that business is booming. While they’re delighted with the outcome, they insist that their next major life decision will occur without the assistance of rum.

H/T: Fox News

Featured image courtesy of Lucky Beach Tangalle.

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