This post contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page.

Once again, Uber makes headlines for a sexual harassment and discrimination lawsuit. This time, the complaint comes from within the officeagain.

Ingrid Avendaño, a software engineer who previously worked for Uber from 2014 to 2017, filed a lawsuit against the company Monday. Avendaño said that during her time working for the ride-share giant, she “experienced a male-dominated work culture, permeated with degrading, marginalizing, discriminatory, and sexually harassing conduct towards women.”

Amongst other examples given to support her case, Avendaño referenced a male Uber employee, who publicly declared at a company recruiting event that “Uber is the type of company where women can sleep their way to the top.” She later found out that same man had started a “false and offensive rumor” that Avendaño had slept with someone at the company. After reporting harassing behavior twice to Uber HR, Avendaño says she was then “isolated and ignored by many male Uber managers and other employees.”

Avendaño also alleges that a male senior software engineer inappropriately touched her during a company retreat, along with other inappropriate sexual advances. Avendaño also referenced inappropriate remarks that were communicated via the company’s internal messaging system. By 2015, the emotional distress of the hostile work environment led Avendaño to begin suffering panic attacks.

Avendaño also said that, as a result of her HR complaints, she was denied promotions and raises commensurate with her role and responsibilities, and was given long hours as the on-call engineer in retaliation.

As the situation continued to worsen, Avendaño took a two-month leave of absence for “mental and physical symptoms of extreme anxiety” in April 2016. 

Avendaño is hardly the first full-time Uber employee to speak up about rampant sexual harassment, discrimination and even assault that has been suppressed by the company. In February 2017, Avendaño’s colleague, software engineer Susan Fowler, penned a blog post “reflecting on one very, very strange year at Uber,”where she listed a laundry list of HR violations that not only were tolerated, but actively covered up within the company. The blog post went viral overnight, forcing Uber to publicly address the situation. Fowler’s allegations resulted in an internal investigation, unearthed a slew of company scandals, led to multiple employees being fired, and contributed to the resignation of then-CEO Travis Kalanick.

The timing of Avendaño’s lawsuit comes just a few scant days after Uber terminated its forced-arbitration policy for passengers who have allegedly been sexually harassed or assaulted by the company’s drivers. The forced-arbitration policy, buried deep in the fine print for users of the app, previously required all passenger claims to be addressed behind mandatory, closed-door arbitration, which kept all legal proceedings confidential. The company also overturned a policy that all victims of sexual harassment and assault had to sign non-disclosure agreements upon settling their claims.

“We have learned it’s important to give sexual assault and harassment survivors control of how they pursue their claims,” Tony West, Uber’s chief legal officer Uber, said in a statement on the company website.

Featured photo by JasonDoiy / Getty Images.

The best beginner points and miles card out there.
Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card

With great travel benefits, 2x points on travel & dining and a 50,000 point sign up bonus, the Chase Sapphire Preferred is a great card for those looking to get into the points and miles game. Here are the top 5 reasons it should be in your wallet, or read our definitive review for more details.

Apply Now
More Things to Know
  • Earn 50,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $625 toward travel when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®
  • Chase Sapphire Preferred named "Best Credit Card for Flexible Travel Redemption" - Kiplinger's Personal Finance, June 2018
  • 2X points on travel and dining at restaurants worldwide & 1 point per dollar spent on all other purchases.
  • No foreign transaction fees
  • 1:1 point transfer to leading airline and hotel loyalty programs
  • Get 25% more value when you redeem for airfare, hotels, car rentals and cruises through Chase Ultimate Rewards. For example, 50,000 points are worth $625 toward travel
  • No blackout dates or travel restrictions - as long as there's a seat on the flight, you can book it through Chase Ultimate Rewards
Intro APR on Purchases
N/A
Regular APR
17.99% - 24.99% Variable
Annual Fee
$0 Intro for the First Year, then $95
Balance Transfer Fee
Either $5 or 5% of the amount of each transfer, whichever is greater.
Recommended Credit
Excellent Credit

Editorial Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Disclaimer: The responses below are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser’s responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.