American Raises the Cost of Alcoholic Drinks

Sep 25, 2018

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If you’re looking to imbibe on your next American Airlines flight, be prepared to pay a little extra. As of October 1, 2018, American is increasing the amount you’ll have to pay in order to drink up on AA flights.

As The Forward Cabin is reporting, as of Oct. 1, you’ll have to fork over the following amounts:

  • Beer: $8
  • Wine: $9
  • Spirits: $9

“Over the last few years, we’ve continued to improve the selections available on board with more craft beer choices, premium liquor and new wines,” an American Airlines spokesperson said in an email to TPG. “Recent enhancements include new craft beers, rose wine and premium liquors including Woodford Reserve and Glenlivet.”

For each of the categories, the price is increasing by $1. AA currently charges $7 for beer, $8 for wine and $8 for spirits.

With the new prices taking effect as of Oct. 1, some flyers will still be exempt from the cost. Passengers sitting in Main Cabin Extra and Executive Platinum and ConciergeKey elites will still get complimentary wine, beer and spirits.

If you frequently fly with American — and enjoy a drink while on board — consider signing up for the Citi / AAdvantage Executive World Elite Mastercard, which offers a 25% savings on in-flight purchases.

Featured image by DANIEL SLIM / AFP / Getty Images.

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