Americans can now visit 90+ countries and territories — here’s the complete list

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Editor’s note: This post has been updated with the latest information and will be updated often.


The United States is still dealing with one of the worst coronavirus outbreaks in the world with more than 32.4 million cases and 577,566 deaths as of May 4, 2021, according to Johns Hopkins University. But as cases decline and the vaccine rollout continues, travelers are seeing a measure of hope for soon getting back to exploring the world.

The U.S. State Department did, however, recently change its travel advisory for 80% of international destinations to Level 4: Do Not Travel. This was done to better align with recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which continues to discourage U.S. citizens from non-essential international travel—especially those who are not yet fully vaccinated—at least for a few more months. But the welcome mat that had been rolled up for Americans for much of 2020 is now back in place and more than 90 countries have reopened to U.S. tourists, including Iceland, which began allowing in vaccinated U.S. travelers as of April 6, 2021, and Greece, which did the same as of April 19, 2021.

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So what’s open? The full list is below. We included two U.S. territories (Puerto Rico and the USVI) among our destinations. Mexico, Central America and most islands in the Caribbean are also open to tourists, with varying degrees of testing and quarantine required—from no testing or quarantine in Mexico, Costa Rica and the Dominican Republic to pre-travel testing and 14-day resort quarantine in St. Lucia.

Unfortunately, most of Asia, most of Oceania and most of Europe remain off-limits—but French Polynesia recently reopened to Americans and leadership of the European Union recently indicated that vaccinated Americans will be welcome within the EU by summer. Many countries in Africa are currently welcoming tourists, but ongoing regional conflicts and the spread of COVID-19 variants make travel in some of them inadvisable.

There are also a few countries where you can enter once you’ve quarantined in a third country that is accepting Americans. Malta is one.

Related: A country-by-country guide to coronavirus recovery

Be sure to consult the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), U.S. State Department and local U.S. Embassy websites and read restrictions for U.S. residents carefully before planning a trip.

In This Post

What places are open for Americans?

Albania

COVID-19 test required: No

Other restrictions: A 14-day mandatory quarantine for anyone entering Albania from Greece or North Macedonia; daily 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew; and masks are mandatory in public spaces.

What’s open: Most businesses, with limited hours (takeout and delivery only from restaurants during curfew) and social distancing restrictions.

Commercial flights returned to Albania in June 2020, and the government lifted all restrictions on tourism on July 1, 2020. There are no testing requirements for visitors, but a health screening at the airport is mandatory. If a passenger has COVID-19 symptoms and/or a fever they may be required to undergo testing and a government quarantine. As the U.S. Embassy in Albania notes, “Travelers should be prepared for travel restrictions to be put into effect with little or no advance notice.”

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Albania is Level 4: Do Not Travel. Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Albania.

 Related: 5 reasons to visit Albania in 2020

Anguilla

COVID-19 test required: Yes, but travel to the island has been suspended through May 6, 2021

• 3-5 days (72 to 120 hours) before departure, again upon arrival and a third time on day 10 or 14
• PCR test required (infants and toddlers are not excluded)

Other restrictions: Anguilla, which had been welcoming approved visitors, has temporarily suspended entry (and its visitor application portal) through May 6, 2021. When the suspension is lifted, Travel Authorization will be required for short-stay tourists and anyone seeking to work from Anguilla; each individual traveler (including children) needs an authorization; travelers entering/transferring via Dutch St. Maarten also must complete St. Maarten’s health screening application form and pre-arrange boat or air travel to Anguilla; quarantine/movement restrictions are required for at least 10 days until the second on-island test results are received.

What’s open: Anguilla has certified many resorts, restaurants and activities certified for Safe Environment use by tourists.

Anguilla is welcoming travelers, but step-by-step instructions involving authorization, hotel and transfer reservations and testing need to be strictly followed. The government recommends starting the application process at least seven days before your intended travel date. Travel health insurance that covers COVID-19 and is valid in Anguilla is also required.

After presenting a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken 3-5 days before arrival, travelers must undergo a temperature check and be tested again upon arrival in Anguilla and then again on day 10 or 14 (right now it is 14 days for U.S. travelers). Guests must stay in place at their accommodations until receiving their second on-island test result or use Safe Environment Approved ground transportation to visit Safe Environment Certified restaurants or participate in Safe Environment Approved activities. See FAQs here.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Note: Many resorts in the Caribbean are offering on-site COVID-19 PCR and rapid Antigen tests to their guests.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Anguilla is Level 3: Reconsider Travel. Visit the U.S. Embassy in Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean, which oversees Anguilla, for additional information.

Antigua and Barbuda

Ffryers Bay in Antigua. Image by Ian Rogers Photography / Getty Images.
Ffryers Bay in Antigua. Image by Ian Rogers Photography / Getty Images.

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 7 days before departure
• PCR test required (for all travelers age 12 and older)

Other restrictions: All travelers must stay at a certified property, where they will be monitored for COVID-19 for up to 14 days; further testing upon arrival or at the place of lodging may be required as determined by the Health Authorities (cost: $100 per person); there is an 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew.

What’s open: Beaches from 5 a.m. to 6 p.m. (but music, alcohol and parties are prohibited); certified hotels, excursions and restaurants; bars remain closed.

Antiqua and Barbuda reopened to tourists on June 4, 2020, and American Airlines has resumed flights there. However, according to the islands’ latest Travel Advisory, visitors must complete a health declaration form as well as stay in certified accommodations and only book certified tours. They must also adhere to social distancing guidelines, including face masks in public. Failure to do so could result in a fine of up to $5,000 XCD ($1,850) and/or imprisonment for up to six months.

The Points Guy founder Brian Kelly canceled an early June 2020  trip to Antigua but eventually was able to make the trip.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Note: Many resorts in the Caribbean are offering on-site COVID-19 PCR and rapid Antigen tests to their guests.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Antigua and Barbuda is Level 4: Do Not Travel. Visit the U.S. Embassy in Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean, which oversees Antigua and Barbuda, for additional information.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Antigua and Barbuda.

 Sign up for TPG’s new weekly newsletter written by Brian Kelly.

Armenia

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before arrival (or submit to a test upon arrival)
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Passengers who opt to test upon arrival (cost: $40) are required to self-isolate until they receive the result (usually within 24 hours); face masks are required in all public spaces and on public transportation and violators could face fines of 10,000 dram ($19).

What’s open: Most hotels, businesses and public transportation.

Armenia is welcoming visitors arriving via Zvartnots International Airport. Visitors can travel the country without restrictions and there is no curfew in place.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Armenia is Level 4: Do Not Travel. Visit the U.S. Embassy in Armenia website for additional information.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Armenia.

Aruba

Aruba December 2017. (Photo by Clint Hederson/The Points Guy)
Aruba, December 2017. (Photo by Clint Hederson/The Points Guy)

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 12 to 72 hours before departure (or test upon arrival)
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: All travelers (including children and infants) must submit an online Embarkation/Disembarkation (ED) card within 72 to 4 hours prior to travel and purchase visitors insurance from the nation of Aruba that covers up to $75,000 in health expenses (cost: $30 for travelers age 15 and older and $10 for those 14 and under); masks must be carried at all times and worn in all indoor public spaces, including casinos.

What’s open: Most hotels and businesses, although they are subject to capacity restrictions; some bars are closed, but beach bars, hotel bars and restaurant bars are open; casinos are open with safety measures in place, including closure at 10 p.m. due to an 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew. Details on restrictions can be found here.

Aruba began welcoming American travelers on July 10, 2020, following the admittance of visitors from Europe on July 1, 2020. As part of the required online ED card process, travelers age 15 and older must provide a certified negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 12 to 72 hours of travel to Aruba or take a COVID-19 PCR test upon arrival ($75) and quarantine in their hotel room until receiving a negative result (typically within 24 hours). Testing requirements can be found here.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Note: Many resorts in the Caribbean are offering on-site COVID-19 PCR and rapid Antigen tests to their guests.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Aruba is Level 4: Do Not Travel. Visit the website of the U.S. Consulate General in Curacao, which overseas Aruba, for additional information.

Bahamas

(Photo courtesy Knight Frank)
(Photo courtesy Knight Frank)

COVID-19 test required: Yes (but as of May 1, 2021, vaccinated travelers are exempt from testing)

• 5 days (120 hours) before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: All U.S. visitors, even those who are fully vaccinated, must purchase a “Bahamas Health Visa” (choose international) prior to arrival ($40 or $70, depending on length of stay; minors under age 18 can be added to an adult’s visa), as well as health insurance, and upload negative pre-travel test results into the online visa form (travelers who are two weeks or more past completing vaccination must upload proof of vaccination); a second rapid Antigen test is required for any unvaccinated traveler staying more than four nights/five days; unvaccinated travelers must also self-report through the completion of a daily health questionnaire for a period of 14 days or the duration of stay (whichever is shorter); face masks are mandatory in all public settings (excluding the beach); violators are subject to a $200 fine for not wearing a mask and $1,000 for not taking the second test (with one-month imprisonment also possible); there are nightly curfews from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. on Nassau, Paradise Island, Grand Bahama, Eleuthera, Exuma and Abaco. In addition, all inter-island travel requires the completion of another online health application (choose domestic) and a negative test (for unvaccinated travelers).

What’s open: Hotels, restaurants and most businesses and attractions are operating, with social distancing measures in place; conditions may vary from island to island, requiring increased restrictions (as of March 1, 2021, only outdoor dining and takeout/delivery are allowed at restaurants on Nassau & Paradise Island and Abaco).

After hitting several road bumps in its reopening—first opening up in July 2020, then shutting down again—the Bahamas has fully reopened to international travelers, including Americans. There are still a few hurdles for visitors, but the process is fairly straightforward. Complete details on pre-arrival requirements, including the Bahamas Health Visa, can be found here.

Related: Bahamas reopening

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Note: Many resorts in the Caribbean are offering on-site COVID-19 PCR and rapid Antigen tests to their guests.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for the Bahamas is Level 4: Do Not Travel. Visit the U.S. Embassy in the Bahamas website for additional information.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in the Bahamas.

Bahrain

COVID-19 test required: Not pre-travel; all visitors age six and older will be tested upon arrival in Bahrain at their own expense and are required to self-isolate until receiving results.

Other restrictions: All travelers must download the BeAware Bahrain app; travelers staying in Bahrain for more than five days must submit to and pay for a second test on day 5 and a third on day 10 (currently 36 Bahraini dinars/$95 for all three tests), with steep fines of 1,000 Bahraini Dinars/$2,645 to 10,000 dinars/$26,500 and possible jail time for non-compliance; any positive test results will result in quarantine at a government facility until a clean bill of health is received; face masks are mandatory in all public spaces (with a 20 Bahraini dinar/$53 fine for non-compliance).

What’s open: Most hotels and businesses; indoor dining remains limited after a recent suspension.

U.S. travelers have been permitted to receive a visa upon arrival and enter Bahrain since Sept. 4, 2020. Visitors do not need to bring a negative COVID-19 PCR test when traveling to Bahrain as all arrivals will be tested at the airport. However, the U.S. Embassy in Bahrain reports that flight schedules are reduced and remain subject to cancellation and that visitors should be prepared for travel restrictions to be put into place with little or no advance notice.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Bahrain is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Bahrain.

Bangladesh

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure to Bangladesh and also 72 hours prior to departure from Bangladesh
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Travelers must have existing Bangladeshi visas (as long as they have not yet expired, they can be renewed); all visitors in possession of a negative test result must still undergo “home quarantine” in their accommodations for 14 days; travelers transiting from Bangladesh through the United Kingdom face additional requirements.

What’s open: With COVID-19 cases and deaths reaching record highs, the country entered a national lockdown on April 5, 2021 (through at least May 5, 2021) and on April 14, 2021 suspended international flights through April 30, 2021 (limited flights resumed on May 1, 2021); during lockdown, public transportation is not operating, all tourist sites are closed and most businesses are closed with a 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew; most businesses and public transportation had previously been open, with passengers required to wear face masks and be seated with social distancing measures in place; the government has established a three-zone system (Red, Yellow and Green) to categorize case levels and an uptick in cases could signal more restrictive measures.

U.S. citizens can visit Bangladesh, provided they already have an existing visa and are willing to quarantine, according to the U.S. Embassy in Bangladesh. However a nationwide lockdown through at least May 5, 2021 to fight a record surge in cases, has closed all tourist sites, most businesses and all domestic public transportation.

The U.S. is considered a Group C country and all travelers at 10 and older must present written proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of travel upon arrival in Bangladesh, followed by 14 days of home/self-quarantine. Authorities will also collect health information cards and conduct temperature screenings. Travelers are also required to produce a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours of departing the country.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Bangladesh is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Bangladesh.

Barbados

Bottom Bay in Barbados. (Photo by TommL/Getty Images)
Bottom Bay in Barbados. (Photo by TommL/Getty Images)

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before arrival (plus testing while in Barbados)
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Travelers must complete an online immigration and customs form at least 24 hours before arrival in Barbados; all visitors must then board approved transportation to their resort and quarantine in their rooms for seven days as they await results of a PCR test taken on day 5. Note: Beginning May 8, 2021, travelers who are two weeks or more past completing vaccination—and who have not traveled through countries of special consideration (South Africa, Brazil or India) within the past 21 days—will need to show proof of vaccination, be tested upon arrival and only need to remain at their pre-approved accommodation until receiving a negative result (one to two days); then they are free to move around the island.

What’s open: Most hotels, but hotel restaurants are open for room-service only for quarantining guests; beaches are now open from 5 a.m. to 7 p.m. for swimming or exercise only and indoor dining has resumed, but bar capacity is capped at 50%; there is an 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew.

Barbados reopened to international travelers on July 12, 2020. JetBlue resumed commercial flights from the U.S. on July 25, 2020 and American Airlines on August 5, 2020. In mid-November, Barbados announced a partnership with Stage Zero Life Sciences for pre-travel testing for U.S. visitors (required for all travelers age 5 and older).

As of May 8, 2021, all visitors need to fill out an online immigrations/customs form and download the BIMSafe app at least 24 hours prior to travel and book pre-approved accommodations. Those who are unvaccinated must agree to in-room quarantine (no beach or leaving the property) until they take a second PCR test on day 5 and receive a negative result (available within another 48 hours). They must also self-monitor for symptoms for seven days, including daily temperature checks (bring a thermometer), and report them via the BIMSafe app and to public health teams who will call or text. Updated requirements for unvaccinated and fully vaccinated travelers visiting after May 8, 2021 can be found here.

Related: Barbados wants you to move there and work remotely

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Note: Many resorts in the Caribbean are offering on-site COVID-19 PCR and rapid Antigen tests to their guests.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Barbados is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Information on Barbados’ response to coronavirus and any updates to its protocols can be found on the government website. You can also visit the U.S. Embassy in Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean website for additional information.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Barbados.

Belarus

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: 10-day quarantine is required for all travelers from “red zone” countries, which includes the U.S.; travelers must complete their quarantine in Belarus and will not be allowed to leave the country until doing so; Americans also require a visa for entry and must submit a health questionnaire and undergo temperature checks upon arrival.

What’s open: Most hotels and businesses are open; there is no curfew or restrictions on movement throughout the country.

Belarus is in the middle of a popular uprising against the man called the “last dictator in Europe” and the CDC places the country at Level 4 (Very High Level of COVID-19), so it may not be the best time to visit, but since Aug. 15, 2020, the country bordering Russia is open to American tourists.

U.S. travelers are only allowed to enter via Minsk National Airport, according to the U.S. Embassy in Belarus. Land borders are currently closed ti U.S. citizens.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Belarus is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Belarus.

Belize

One of the most famous diving spots in the world is Belize's Blue Hole. (Photo via Shutterstock)
One of the most famous diving spots in the world is Belize’s Blue Hole. (Photo via Shutterstock)

COVID-19 test required: Yes (but not for travelers who have completed their vaccination)

• 96 hours before departure for PCR tests or 48 hours before departure for rapid Antigen tests (Sophia, SD Biosensor and Abbott Panbio only)
• Testing upon arrival is also possible at a cost of $50

Other restrictions: All travelers must download the Belize Health App and complete the required information within 72 hours of their flight to Belize; they must also present a confirmed booking at one of Belize’s Gold Standard hotels. If a traveler tests positive upon arrival in Belize they will be required to quarantine at a Ministry of Health-approved hotel for a minimum of 14 days at their own expense; face masks are required in public spaces and social distancing is practiced.

What’s open: Most hotels and businesses are open and there are no regional travel restrictions, but travelers are encouraged to stay within Belize’s “Safe Corridors” and to use Gold Standard tour operators and dine at approved restaurants; there is currently a nightly curfew from 10 p.m. to 4:59 a.m. and restaurants are open for outdoor dining and takeout/delivery only.

Belize’s Philip Goldson International Airport (BEZ) reopened on August 15, 2020, and tourism to Belize resumed on Oct. 1, 2020, with travel requirements and restrictions in place. The latest updates can be found here.

Related: Planning your trip to Belize during coronavirus

As of March 13, 2021, anyone who is fully vaccinated against COVID-19 can visit without pre-travel testing by presenting proof of vaccine completion at least two weeks prior to arrival.

All visitors must also stay at one of the country’s full-service hotels or resorts that have received the Belize Tourism Gold Standard Certificate of Recognition—and arrive with a confirmed reservation. Among the requirements for Gold Standard designation: transportation provided to and from the airport, a restaurant on-property and strict cleanliness protocols.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Note: Many resorts in the Caribbean region are offering on-site COVID-19 PCR and rapid Antigen tests to their guests.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Belize is Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution. Additional information is available on the U.S. Embassy in Belize website.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Belize.

Benin

COVID-19 test required: Yes, upon arriving and departing Benin (must be pre-booked at cost of 50,000 CFA, or $92)

Other restrictions: Travelers are encouraged to self-isolate for 14 days.

What’s open: Businesses and transportation are operating normally; there is no curfew.

Benin is welcoming international travelers via Cotonou Cadjehoun Airport, which is operating at close to pre-pandemic levels, according to the U.S. Embassy in Benin. To enter the country travelers will need to apply for an eVisa and upon arrival undergo both a COVID-19 rapid test and a PCR test; testing is also required prior to departure from Benin. A positive rapid test upon arrival will result in quarantine until receiving a negative PCR result. All travelers are encouraged to self-isolate for 14 days. Anyone staying longer than 15 days must also undergo a third test. If all testing is negative, no quarantine is required.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Benin is Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Benin.

Bermuda

Fly United between Bermuda and Newark. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.
Bermuda (Photo by Shutterstock)

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 5 days (120 hours) before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: All travelers must complete the online Bermuda Travel Authorization process within 72 to 25 hours of departure for the island; a $75 fee per traveler covers the cost of required on-island testing (children age nine and younger are exempt from testing and their Travel Authorization fee is $30); all travelers must also have health insurance valid in Bermuda and for the treatment of COVID-19 and test again upon arrival as well as on days 4, 8 and 14 of their visit; face masks are required in public spaces. Note: Fully immunized travelers must quarantine only until receiving their arrival test results (generally 24 hours or less) and then are free to explore and do not have to wear wristbands—but they still must test on days 4, 8 and 14 (if their stay is that long). Details are here.

What’s open: Most hotels and businesses, subject to social distancing requirements; as of April 20, 2021, there is an 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew and restaurants are open for takeout and delivery only. details are here.

Bermuda reopened to tourists, including to Americans, on July 1, 2020. There are strict protocols to follow both before and after arrival. For details on the process, check the Travel Authorization FAQ.

Within five days of departure, visitors age 10 and older are required to take a COVID-19 PCR test. Children who are 9 and younger are exempt but are subject to their adult travel companion’s quarantine; children 10-17 must receive parental consent to be tested and if consent is denied the young traveler must quarantine for 14 days on arrival. Negative test results must be entered as part of the online travel authorization process and be presented upon arrival in Bermuda.

Related: Bermuda opening to Americans July 1

All travelers must also take a mandatory second COVID-PCR test upon arrival in the airport and self-quarantine in their accommodation until receiving results (generally 24 hours or less). Visitors must also submit to subsequent tests on days 4, 8 and 14 of their visit (if their stay is that long).

Health insurance covering illness and injury outside of your home jurisdiction, including those related to a positive COVID-19 diagnosis while in Bermuda, is required and, if not obtained, a visitor will be responsible for all health and accommodation costs should they require treatment for COVID-19 and/or quarantine.

Related: Visiting Bermuda with kids

Visitors to Bermuda are also required to pack a thermometer to record their temperature twice a day and, if not yet immunized, wear a series of Traveller Wristbands for the first 14 days of their stay, which will remind them to be careful of their movements (restricted by color). Removal of the wristband will result in a fine of $500 and home quarantine with an electronic monitoring bracelet. More information on coronavirus in Bermuda can be found here.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Many resorts in the Caribbean have begun offering on-property rapid Antigen and PCR tests to guests prior to departure for the U.S., so check your resort’s policy before traveling.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Bermuda is Level 4: Do Not Travel. The U.S. Consulate General in Bermuda website has additional information.

More reading: New resort and hotel options in Bermuda

Bolivia

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: American travelers need a tourist visa is (available at any Bolivian land or air border or at the Bolivian Consulate in the U.S. for $160). All arriving passengers must also submit a sworn statement of location of stay within Bolivia, undergo temperature checks and health screenings, quarantine for 10 days and take another PCR test 7 days after arrival (at the traveler’s cost); those who do not have permanent residence in Bolivia must have health insurance with coverage for COVID-19 valid in the country.

What’s open: Most businesses and public transportation

Bolivia had been off-limits to Americans until recently, but the country is once again welcoming U.S visitors. The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Bolivia, however, is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

All passengers must also submit a certified negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of their flight (children five years old and younger are exempt) and quarantine for at least 10 days after entering Bolivia (diplomats are exempt), with a PCR test on day 7. The wearing of face masks in public places is mandatory and social distancing requirements remain in effect. There is no curfew and there are no restrictions on intercity travel.

The U.S. Embassy in Bolivia reports that commercial flights have resumed—Boliviana de Aviacion (BoA) airline has periodic flights between La Paz and Miami—but that travelers should expect that additional restrictions affecting international travel could be put in place with little advance notice.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Bolivia.

Bonaire

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before arrival
• PCR test required (plus a negative rapid Antigen test taken no more than 24 hours prior to arrival)

OR

• A negative COVID-19 NAAT test taken within 24 hours of departure

Other restrictions: All travelers must complete a health declaration form 48 hours prior to departure for Bonaire; having travel insurance valid in Bonaire is recommended but not required.

What’s open: Most businesses and public transportation, with social distancing measures in place; Bonaire did enact Phase 6 level lockdown measures for two weeks beginning March 18, 2021 after a surge in cases, which limited restaurants (except for hotel restaurants serving guests) to take-out only and closed non-essential shops; most restrictions and a curfew were lifted on April 23, 2021.

Americans are welcome to visit Bonaire, but because the U.S. is considered a high-risk country, all travelers age 13 and older are required to present either a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival as well as a negative rapid Antigen test taken within 24 hours of arrival; another option is a negative COVID-19 NAAT test taken within 24 hours of departure. All travelers must also complete a health declaration form.

Face masks are required in the airport and on public transportation.

Delta Airlines, American Airlines and United Airlines are scheduled to resume regular service to Bonaire in May 2021.

For more information on health and safety protocols in Bonaire, check here. You can also visit the website of the U.S. Consulate General in Curacao, which oversees Bonaire.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Many resorts in the Caribbean have begun offering on-property rapid Antigen and PCR tests to guests prior to departure for the U.S., so check your resort’s policy before traveling.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Bonaire is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Bosnia And Herzegovina

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 48 hours before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Face masks are required in all public spaces.

What’s open: Most hotels, restaurants and other businesses, although there is a 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew

Bosnia and Herzegovina reopened to international travelers on Sept. 13, 2020, and Americans can visit, although the U.S. Embassy in Bosnia and Herzegovina continues to report that the country is currently experiencing a high number of COVID-19 cases.

A negative PCR test result taken within 48 hours of arrival is required to enter. According to the U.S. Embassy, requirements and restrictions may change with little or no advance notice.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Bosnia and Herzegovina is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Botswana

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure for Botswana (and also 72 before departure from Botswana)
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Health screening and rapid Antigen test upon entry; a negative test is also required to exit the country.

What’s open: Some businesses, many safari lodges and Chobe National Park; some transportation within Botswana is limited; restaurants are open at reduced capacity.

Botswana, one of Africa’s top safari destinations, is open to American tourists. A visa is not required, but the U.S. State Department’s advisory for Botswana is Level 4: Do not Travel and cases had been rising through early April 2021.

According to the U.S. Embassy in Botswana, limited commercial flights to Botswana are available through South Africa and Ethiopia and some charter flights to Kasane and Maun may be available (check with tour companies operating in Botswana). The U.S. banned travel from South Africa (for non-U.S. citizens or permanent residents) on Jan. 30, 2021, due to the COVID-19 variant circulating there, so flight schedules transiting through South Africa may be more limited or subject to change.

All passengers must present a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of travel to Botswana; quarantine is not required.

All passengers must also present a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of their departure from Botswana, which parallels a Jan. 26, U.S. requirement that everyone aged two and older traveling to the U.S. from Botswana must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights. Details are available here.

Gaborone has a 10 p.m. to 4 a.m. curfew in place until further notice. Permits are required to travel between any of Botswana’s nine zones and are restricted to essential travel. Tourism is considered essential, but additional COVID-19 testing may be required to travel between zones.

There are fines for non-compliance of Botswana’s mask mandate and other restrictions.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Botswana.

Brazil

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil May 2018. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil May 2018. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Passengers must complete a Traveler’s Health Declaration form.

What’s open: Most hotels and businesses; the Brazilian government has imposed very few restrictions.

Brazil has the third highest number of coronavirus cases in the world—and the second-highest number of deaths, after the United States—and in throughout March and April 2021 experienced record-high surges in cases, topping 4,000 deaths in a single day, because of a troubling new COVID-19 variant that has caused many countries, including the U.S., to ban entry of travelers from Brazil.

Brazil lifted its own travel ban on foreigners at the end of July 2020 and tourists are welcome. However, the U.S. State Department has issued a Level 4: Do Not Travel advisory for Brazil and the U.S. Embassy in Brazil continues to recommend that all travelers who do choose to go to Brazil purchase insurance before departing the United States even though Brazil no longer requires proof of health insurance to enter the country.

Since December 2020, all travelers aged 12 and older arriving in Brazil by air, both tourists and residents, must present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 72 hours prior to boarding and complete a Traveler’s Health Declaration form.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

Brazilians are currently not allowed to travel to the U.S., which has also banned entry by foreign nationals who have been to Brazil in the past 14 days.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Brazil.

The British Virgin Islands

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 120 hours before departure (and twice while in the BVI)
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: All visitors must register no later than 48 hours of travel; take a second PCR test upon arrival and a third on day 4; and download a tracking app and wear a wristband; as of May 15, 2021, fully vaccinated travelers (two weeks or more past completion of vaccination) must follow all protocols, but can end quarantine after getting a negative result from their arrival test in the BVI.

What’s open: Most hotels, resorts, restaurants, businesses and activities, with social distancing measures in place.

The British Virgin Islands officially re-opened to tourism on Dec. 1, 2020. Americans can visit, but all travelers must follow strict protocols. These include:

  • Providing a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 120 hours (5 days) of departure for the BVI.
  • Registering on the BVI Gateway seven days (and no later than 48 hours) before travel, and completing the application no later than 24 hours before travel.
  • Obtaining COVID-19 health insurance valid in the BVI.
  • Taking a second PCR test upon arrival in the BVI (as of May 15, 2021, fully vaccinated travelers can end their quarantine after receiving the results of this test).
  • Quarantining at their resort for four full days while using an activated tracking system on their phones and wearing a wristband monitoring device.
  • Taking a third PCR test on day 4 and await the results (typically given within 24 hours) before being able to move freely around the islands.
  • Pay a $175 per person fee for testing and tracking devices.

Complete details on travel requirements and restrictions can be found here.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Many resorts in the Caribbean have begun offering on-property rapid Antigen and PCR tests to guests prior to departure for the U.S., so check your resort’s policy before traveling.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for the BVI is Level 4: Do Not Travel, while the CDC’s advisory is Level 1: Low Level of COVID-19. Check the website of the U.S. Embassy in Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean, which overseas the BVI, for additional information.

Cape Verde

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure to Cape Verde (and 72 hours prior to departure from Cape Verde)
• PCR test or rapid Antigen test required

Other restrictions: Travelers must complete a health questionnaire; face mask mandates and inter-island travel restrictions are in place.

What’s open: Most businesses, public transportation and tourist sites; some islands may have reduced opening hours and capacity restrictions.

Americans are allowed to visit Cape Verde, a group of 10 islands located off of Africa, where international flights resumed on Oct. 12, 2020. According to the U.S. Embassy in Cape Verde, all travelers must complete a health questionnaire and provide a negative COVID-19 PCR or rapid Antigen test taken within 72 hours of travel (children under age seven are exempt from testing). Authorities will also conduct a health screening upon arrival.

Cases have surged throughout April 2021 and while there is currently no curfew, inter-island travel restrictions are in place. Islands with a COVID-19 infection rate below 20 per 100,000 inhabitants are considered “green” and passengers from those islands do not need COVID-19 tests for inter-island travel. But those traveling from “non-green” islands to any “green” island must show a negative COVID-19 rapid test result taken no more than 72 hours prior to departure.

Face masks are required in public spaces, including sidewalks, and violators are subject to fines of about $165.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Cape Verde is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Cape Verde.

Chile

COVID-19 test required: Yes, but Chile has temporarily suspended entry by non-resident foreigners through at least May 31, 2021 due to record high COVID-19 cases

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: All travelers need to complete an electronic affidavit and have proof of health insurance valid in Chile for COVID-19 health issues; there is also a mandatory 10-day quarantine.

What’s open: Most businesses and many hotels and restaurants, with varying restrictions in place;  public transportation is running.

A trip to Chile is no longer possible, at least in May 2021, as the country has temporarily suspended entry by all non-resident foreigners through the end of the month. Americans had been allowed to visit Chile since Nov. 23, 2020, according to the U.S. Embassy in Chile, when the country began to gradually reopen its borders to foreign visitors via Santiago Airport.

All travelers are required to present three documents: a completed Affidavit of Travelers electronic form (done within 48 hours of travel); proof of a negative result from a COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to departure; and proof of a health insurance policy that provides coverage for COVID-19 and related health issues during the traveler’s stay in Chile.

Since Dec. 31, 2020, anyone entering Chile with those three documents had also has to undergo a 10-day quarantine, with a test taken on day 7 and a negative result releasing them from quarantine.

As of March 31, 2021, however, the government said the first five days of quarantine need to be spent in a “transit hotel” (at the traveler’s cost); after receiving a negative test, travelers would then be released to finish their 10-day quarantine at their chosen hotel or residence. All non-resident foreigners are also required to complete a 14-day “Period of Vigilance for Travelers” by reporting their location and health condition to authorities daily via email.

Related: Chile is Open to Americans, But There are New Restrictions

Chile is under a State of Emergency through June 2021 and much of the country is under mandatory quarantine restrictions, which vary by region and neighborhood; there is a nationwide 9 p.m. curfew and face masks are required in public.

LATAM has resumed flights between Santiago and the U.S., but before November 2020 they had been used mostly for humanitarian and repatriation flights.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s travel advisory for Chile is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Chile.

Colombia

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 96 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Health screening and testing/quarantine upon arrival for those without the required pre-travel testing.

What’s open: Many hotels, restaurants and businesses, with safety protocols in place; restrictions vary widely by city, with some curfews starting at 6 p.m.

Americans can travel to Colombia for tourism, where international flights resumed on Sept. 21, 2020, and are now available to Bogota and seven other cities, according to the U.S. Embassy in Colombia.

Related: Colombia is open, but should you go?

Since Jan. 7, 2021, all travelers to Colombia are required to show proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 96 hours of flight departure. Passengers also face health screenings at their point of arrival and with very limited exceptions (citizens and diplomats and special visa holders) may be allowed to take an oath that they were unable to get a required pre-travel test; they will then be required to self-quarantine until receiving a negative test result.

Current requirements also call for all visitors to complete the online pre-travel registration form “Check-Mig” within one to 24 hours of their flight departure time; download CoronApp to self-report their health throughout the duration of their trip; and wear a mask at all times and wash their hands on a consistent basis. Further details are available here.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Colombia is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Colombia.

Costa Rica

COVID-19 test required: No

Other restrictions: All travelers must complete a digital HEALTH PASS and have travel/medical insurance with set minimum coverage; face masks are required in all public spaces; expect health screenings upon arrival.

What’s open: As of March 2021, the majority of hotels, restaurants and businesses are operating; national parks are open at 100% capacity; bars and casinos can operate at 50% capacity; and beaches are open from 5 a.m. to 6 p.m.

American tourists are welcome to visit Costa Rica, and as of Nov. 1, 2020, no longer need to quarantine or provide a negative PCR test.

Related: All you need to know to visit Costa Rica

All travelers to Costa Rica must complete a digital form called HEALTH PASS, available within 48 hours of travel. A form needs to be submitted for each individual traveler, including minors. It is also mandatory that all travelers have travel insurance that will cover accommodations (minimum of $2,000) in case of quarantine and medical expenses (minimum of $50,000) due to COVID-19 illness. For details, click here.

Note that any emergency medical or dental coverage provided by credit cards such as the Chase Sapphire Reserve will not meet this requirement.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Many resorts in Costa Rica have begun offering on-property rapid Antigen and PCR tests to guests prior to departure for the U.S., so check your resort’s policy before traveling.

Travelers can also visit the U.S. Embassy in Costa Rica website for information. The U.S. State Department’s travel advisory for Costa Rica is currently Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Costa Rica.

Cote d’Ivoire

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 120 hours (5 days) before arrival in Côte d’Ivoire and 120 hours (5 days) before departure from Côte d’Ivoire (but U.S. requirement is 72 hours/3 days)
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: All travelers must fill out an Air Travel Declaration Form and pay the required fees online.

What’s open: Most businesses (restaurants, bars and shops) and public transportation.

Côte d’Ivoire remains under a Health State of Emergency, with increased health measures and a recommendation against non-essential movement, according to the U.S. Embassy in Côte d’Ivoire, which also reports that international air travel resumed with limited service as of July 1, 2020.

Travelers planning to visit Côte d’Ivoire must present a COVID-19 PCR test result taken no more than 120 hours before arrival and fill out a travel declaration form.

Everyone departing Côte d’Ivoire is also required to present a negative PCR test taken no more than 120 hours before departure. Note: The U.S. requirement (as of Jan. 26, 2021) is that all international air travelers returning to the U.S. present a negative viral (PCR or rapid Antigen) test taken within 72 hours of travel, so to sync the two requirements, a PCR test within 72 hours is required. Check here for details.

Côte d’Ivoire also requires face masks and social distancing when traveling through any public area;  there are capacity limitations for venues.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Côte d’Ivoire is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Côte d’Ivoire.

Croatia

COVID-19 test required: Yes, unless the traveler is 14 days past completing their COVID-19 vaccinations or has recovered from an infection

• 48 hours before arrival
• PCR or rapid Antigen test required

Other restrictions: Travelers must complete an entry form and have proof of a hotel reservation that is paid in full; those who do not have a valid test result can test upon arrival and self-isolate until receiving the result; masks must be worn in indoor public spaces and outdoors when social distancing can not be maintained.

What’s open: Most businesses, as well as museums, galleries and casinos (with capacity restrictions), but restaurants and bars are limited to outdoor dining and take-out; nightclubs are closed and alcohol sales in other venues must end at 10 p.m; public transportation is running.

U.S. travelers can once again visit Croatia. Croatia had reopened for tourists from all countries, but  on Dec. 1, 2020, the government restricted entry and border crossings and instituted varying levels of lockdown to help limit COVID-19 transmission, and as a result, entry for tourism purposes was not permitted for U.S. citizens. That changed as of April 1, 2021.

According to the U.S. Embassy in Croatia, U.S. tourists must fill out the Enter Croatia form and present one of the following:

  • a negative result of a COVID-19 PCR or rapid Antigen test taken less than 48 hours before arrival; those who provide a rapid Antigen test result and are staying in Croatia longer than 10 days must repeat the test within 10 days of the original test.
  • a vaccination certificate showing vaccination was completed at least 14 days before entry to Croatia
  • a certificate confirming recovery from a COVID-19 infection with a positive test result having been received within 11 and 180 days of arrival in Croatia

Travelers can also test upon arrival (at the traveler’s cost) and self-isolate until receiving a negative result. They must also provide proof of accommodation paid in advance in full or they will not be permitted to enter the country.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Croatia is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Croatia.

Curacao

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required (plus a second on-island Antigen test)

Other restrictions: Passengers must complete an online immigration card and prior to travel; health insurance valid in Curacao is required; travelers who test positive for COVID-19 while in Curacao will be quarantined at their own expense; social distancing measures are in place and face masks are required when distancing is not possible.

What’s open: Hotels are open, but after a surge of cases, Curacao announced on March 24, 2021 that for two weeks (now until further notice) all non-essential shops are closed, all restaurants can offer take-out or delivery only between 12 p.m. and 6 p.m. (there is a 7 p.m. island-wide curfew) while those with outside seating can serve guests as of May 4, 2021, and all excursions and activities are canceled; travelers are asked to check with the resort they have reserved about on-property restrictions.

Curacao re-opened to U.S. tourists in November 2020. The U.S. is considered a high-risk country and all American travelers are required to complete a digital immigration card and then, within 48 hours of travel, digitally fill out the Passenger Locator Card (PLC) via the same portal and carry a printed copy with you. A negative result from a COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of departure for Curacao must be uploaded to the portal and passengers are required to carry a copy of the results with you. Children six years and younger are exempt from testing and the PLC.

A second required test was recently added for travelers from high-risk countries (including the U.S.), who on day three after arrival must undergo an on-island Antigen test at a local lab. Travelers will be required to make an appointment for the test to complete their Passenger Locator Card prior to travel. Details can be found here.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Many resorts in the Caribbean have begun offering on-property rapid Antigen and PCR tests to guests prior to departure for the U.S., so check your resort’s policy before traveling.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Curacao is Level 4: Do Not Travel. Visit the U.S. Consulate in Curacao‘s website for additional information.

Cyprus

COVID-19 test required: Yes, with the exception of fully vaccinated travelers as of May 10, 2021

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Travelers must obtain an approved Cyprus Flight Pass and take another test upon arrival.

What’s open: Many hotels are open, but nature trails, parks and beaches are open for exercise only; restaurants are open for takeout service only.

Cyprus, a small island nation off the coast of Turkey, is now open to Americans arriving directly from the United States—however, the country experienced record-high cases for the month of April 2021.

According to the U.S. Embassy in Cyprus, as of April 1, 2021 “the the United States is classified as a ‘Red’ category country. Tourists may travel from the United States to the Republic of Cyprus without mandatory self-isolation provided they have uploaded proof of a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours of boarding a flight to Cyprus, complete another test upon arrival at their own expense (30 euros), and have an approved Cyprus Flight Pass.” Children under the age of 12 do not require testing. As of May 10, 2021, fully vaccinated travelers will be exempt from testing with proof of vaccination.

There is a 9 p.m. daily curfew in place and face coverings are required in all public spaces for people age 12 and older.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Cyprus is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Cyprus.

Democratic Republic of Congo

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Additional testing is required upon arrival, with a self-quarantine (typically 24 hours) until getting the result; travelers must also test again before departure; a visa and proof of yellow fever vaccination are also mandatory.

What’s open: Most businesses and public transportation; Virunga National Park (as of April 1, 2021); there is a 10:00 pm to 4:00 am curfew in Kinshasa, North Kivu, South Kivu, Kongo Central, Lualaba and Haut-Katanga.

The Democratic Republic of Congo, home to Virunga National Park and the endangered mountain gorilla, reopened its borders in August 2020 and Virunga National Park is set to reopen on April 1, 2021. However, armed conflict is ongoing in the DRC and six park rangers were ambushed and killed by militia inside the park in January. In February, the Italian ambassador to DRC was killed along with two others in an ambush.

According to the U.S. Embassy in the Democratic Republic of Congo, all arriving international travelers age 11 and older must have proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken within three days (72 hours) of their departure to DRC. Upon arrival, travelers age 11 and older must take a second COVID-19 test at the airport. Travelers should register their information and pay for the test ($45) at INRBCOVID.com before they begin their travel (tests can also be paid in cash at the airport). After testing at the airport, arriving passengers must self-quarantine until they receive a negative test result, usually within 24 hours.

Americans also need a visa to visit as well as a World Health Organization (WHO) card with proof of yellow fever vaccination.

To exit the DRC, all travelers age 11 and older must pay for and present a negative COVID-19 test from an approved lab taken within 72 hours of travel. This parallels a Jan. 26 requirement by the U.S. government that everyone aged two and older traveling to the U.S. from the Democratic Republic of Congo must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights.

Masks are required in public spaces and the DRC has regional curfews from 10 p.m. to 4 a.m. Testing is required for travel between some provinces.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for the Democratic Republic of Congo is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in the DRC.

Djibouti

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure (and up to 120 hours before arrival)
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Both an eVisa obtained in advance of travel and a second saliva-based COVID-19 test upon arrival are required; travelers must have a supply of masks upon arrival and masks are required inside all buildings.

What’s open: Most businesses (restaurants, shops) and some, but not all, public transportation

Djibouti, located in East Africa, started to reopen its economy in early May 2020 and began allowing air travelers in last fall. In addition to pre-travel testing required for boarding any flight to the country, the U.S. Embassy in Djibouti reports that travelers arriving at Ambouli International Airport will also be screened using a minimally invasive saliva test (cost $30); a positive result will require the traveler to quarantine at their hotel or seek treatment in a local hospital.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Djibouti is Level 3: Reconsider Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Djibouti.

Dominica

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 24 to 72 hours before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Pre-travel online screening and questionnaire; testing upon arrival, followed by quarantine or a managed experience. Arriving passengers must wear color-coded wristbands and face masks and physical distancing is required when in public.

What’s open: Safe in Nature-certified hotel properties and excursions;

Dominica has been open to visitors since Aug. 3, 2020. All eligible arriving travelers are designated as coming from Low-Risk, Medium-Risk or High-Risk countries. The U.S. is currently considered High-Risk and all Americans must follow these procedures:

• Submit a health questionnaire online at least 24 hours prior to arrival

• Present notification of clearance to travel in the form of a doctor’s note or similar document
• Submit a negative PCR test result recorded within 24-72 hours prior to arrival
• Provide confirmation of a booking at a government-certified private property
• Undergo a health assessment upon arrival, including a temperature check
• Provide confirmation of the health questionnaire and negative PCR test results
• Undergo rapid COVID-19 test screening at Dominica’s airport with a negative test result (children under five are exempt).
• After receiving a negative result, travelers need to spend 5-7 days in either mandatory quarantine at a government facility or 5-7 days in a Managed Experience at a Safe in Nature certified property.

Any traveler with a high temperature, high-risk alert from their questionnaire or positive rapid test will be given a PCR test, and be taken into mandatory quarantine at a government-approved facility or hotel at their expense until results are available. If the follow-up test result is positive, the traveler may be quarantined until released by an authorized health professional.

For more information, see Dominica’s Travel Advisory.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Many resorts in the Caribbean have begun offering on-property rapid Antigen and PCR tests to guests prior to departure for the U.S., so check your resort’s policy before traveling.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Dominica is Level 3: Reconsider Travel. Visit the U.S. Embassy for Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean, which oversees Dominica, for more information.

The Dominican Republic 

Playa Blanca, Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, Caribbean Sea. (Photo by © Marco Bottigelli / Getty Images)
Playa Blanca, Punta Cana, Dominican Republic (Photo by Marco Bottigelli / Getty Images)

COVID-19 test required: No, but there are mandatory temperature checks upon arrival and a quick aleatory breath test will be administered to 3% to 15% of arriving passengers age five and older; anyone presenting symptoms or testing positive will be isolated at authorized locations.

Other restrictions: Masks and social distancing guidelines are in place for indoor public spaces, public transportation and outdoors when distancing isn’t possible; there is also an island-wide curfew of 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. (9 p.m. to 5 a.m. on Saturdays and Sundays) through at least May 16, 2021 and disobeying it can result in fines or jail time.

What’s open: Most resorts and hotels, public beaches during non-curfew hours and restaurants at reduced capacity.

The Dominican Republic reopened to tourists in July 1, 2020, when Punta Cana International Airport resumed commercial operations.

Travelers are also required to fill out and submit a combined digital Traveler’s Health Affidavit and an Electronic Entry Ticket to declare they have not felt any COVID-19 related symptoms in the last 72 hours and provide contact details for the next 30 days. The DR is providing a free health coverage plan for all hotel guests through April 30, 2021. For the latest updates on travel to the DR, check here.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Many resorts in the Caribbean have begun offering on-property rapid Antigen and PCR tests to guests prior to departure for the U.S., so check your resort’s policy before traveling.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for the Dominican Republic is Level 4: Do Not Travel. Visit the U.S. Embassy’s website for additional information.

Ecuador

COVID-19 test required: Yes, for unvaccinated travelers

• 72 hours before arrival
• PCR or rapid Antigen test required

Other restrictions: Random rapid Antigen testing (for travelers age 14 and older) may be conducted upon arrival at the airport in Ecuador; travelers who test positive must isolate for 10 days in a government-designated shelter; there are special requirements for entry to the Galapagos Islands.

What’s open: Most hotels and businesses, with social distancing requirements in place.

Ecuador is again open for Americans, although like many countries in South America it has recorded record high cases in April 2021. All arriving passengers, including children over the age of two, are required to present results of a negative COVID-19 PCR or rapid Antigen test taken within 72 hours (changed on March 22, 2021 from the previous requirement of a PCR test taken within 10 days prior to arrival), per the U.S. Embassy in Ecuador. Ecuador is also now allowing travelers who have completed their COVID-19 vaccination and present a vaccination card to enter without testing; travelers who have documented proof of recovery from COVID-19 and are more than one month past the onset of symptom may also present that.

Note: There are special requirements for all travelers to the Galapagos Islands, where a negative COVID-19 test taken within 96 hours must be presented upon arrival. It can be the same test used to enter the country if it’s a PCR test and is still within the required 96 hour timeframe for the Galapagos. To visit the Galapagos via transit through Quito or Guayaquil airports, vaccinated travelers need to present negative test results. The U.S.Embassy also says that travelers to the Galapagos need a “salvoconducto” from their tour operator, and should contact the operator directly for that document.

Airlines are now required to verify that all travelers traveling to Ecuador have a negative test result or proof of vaccination before allowing them to board.

Rapid Antigen testing may also be conducted upon arrival and if the test is positive the traveler will be required to isolate in a government shelter for 10 days. As long as a traveler has the negative PCR test result, doesn’t display any symptoms upon arrival, and doesn’t receive a positive test on a random rapid test at the airport, quarantine is not required.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s travel advisory for Ecuador is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Ecuador.

Egypt

This picture taken on March 25, 2018, shows tourists in front of the Giza pyramids complex, on the southwestern outskirts of the Egyptian capital Cairo. / AFP PHOTO / FETHI BELAID (Photo credit should read FETHI BELAID/AFP/Getty Images)
This picture taken on March 25, 2018, shows tourists in front of the Giza pyramids complex, on the southwestern outskirts of the Egyptian capital Cairo. / AFP PHOTO / FETHI BELAID (Photo credit: FETHI BELAID/AFP/Getty Images)

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 96 hours before departure for passengers from North America, South America, Japan, China, Thailand, London, Paris and Frankfurt (due to transit times); 72 hours for all other travelers.
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: A visa is also required (Americans can get theirs prior to travel via online enrollment or upon arrival); travelers must present the original printed test result; health insurance valid in Egypt is also required.

What’s open: Most hotels, shops, restaurants and some tourist sites; the Great Pyramids of Giza reopened in July 2020; restaurants are operating at 50% capacity.

International tourism resumed in Egypt on July 1, 2020, although tourism at sites such as Luxor has reportedly been quite slow. The Great Pyramids of Giza, for instance, reopened on July 1, 2020, after being closed since March 2020 and undergoing a deep cleaning, reported Reuters.

COVID-19 PCR tests are required for all international arrivals age six and older. All U.S. citizens need a tourist visa (available via online enrollment) and proof of health insurance to enter the country, according to the U.S. Embassy in Egypt. Check with the Egyptian Embassy in Washington, D.C. for more details.

Additional information is available on the Egyptair website.

As of Jan. 3, 2021, anyone not following mask requirements may be subject to fines or prosecution.

Related: Egypt reopening

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Egypt is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Egypt.

Related: Dreaming of visiting Egypt

El Salvador

COVID-19 test required: Yes, if the traveler does not have proof of a completed COVID-19 vaccination

• 72 hours before arrival (from time test results were issued)
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Temperature check upon arrival; mask and social distancing rules are in place.

What’s open: Most hotels, businesses and public transportation, although municipalities can be placed under quarantine with little notice.

El Salvador reopened on Sept. 19, 2020, to commercial flights to Óscar Arnulfo Romero International Airport (SAL) in San Salvador. Local businesses are open with no restrictions.

According to the U.S. Embassy in El Salvador, all airlines have been instructed that travelers age two and older seeking to enter El Salvador must produce a printed negative COVID-19 PCR test result issued within 72 hours of arrival in El Salvador (note: the 72 hours, in this case, refers to the time the test results were issued, not when the sample was collected). The embassy also reports that as of March 29, 2021, passengers who have completed their COVID-19 vaccination can present proof of vaccination instead of a test result. But travelers are advised to confirm with their airline that it will also accept vaccination documentation for boarding.

While in El Salvador, visitors must wear face masks and practice social distancing in all public settings, including at the airport. Arriving passengers will also face temperature checks.

A curfew is currently not in place and there are no quarantine requirements for visitors. The U.S. Embassy notes, however, that the Salvadoran Ministry of Health can place municipalities under special quarantine with little or no prior notice when a high number of COVID-19 cases is detected.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for El Salvador is Level 3: Reconsider Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in El Salvador.

Ethiopia

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 120 hours (5 days) before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Health check upon arrival and mandatory 7-day self-quarantine

What’s open: Most businesses and public transportation, with capacity limits

Commercial flights have resumed to Ethiopia. Entry rules require that every international traveler present a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 120 hours (5 days) of arrival, according to the U.S. Embassy in Ethiopia. Upon arrival, passengers will undergo a health check, register with authorities and self-quarantine at home or in a hotel for seven days. Anyone showing symptoms will be taken to a government-run isolation center.

Ethiopia has reported accelerated spread of COVID-19 infections throughout March and early April 2021.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Ethiopia is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Ethiopia.

French Polynesia

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: All travelers must complete and online registration form and take an Antigen test upon arrival; non-vaccinated travelers are required to quarantine for 10 days with PCR tests on days 4 and 8; fully vaccinated travelers do not need to quarantine, but must test on day 4.

What’s open: Most resorts and businesses, but there are curfews of 10 p.m. to 4 a.m. on the islands of Tahiti and Moorea.

The South Pacific island nation originally officially reopened on July 15, 2020. Since Feb. 3, 2021, however, French Polynesia had banned entry by international tourists until further notice — but on April 15, 2021 announced a gradual return to tourism as of May 1, 2021. The islands have initially opened to countries with “limited epidemic risk” and Americans are among the travelers who can once again visit for tourism. Updates can be found here.

Related coverage: French Polynesia will reopen

Enhanced protocols have been announced based on whether the traveler has completed vaccination, has antibodies from a prior infection or remains unvaccinated. Everyone six years of age and older is required to present a negative COVID-19 (RT-PCR) test taken 72 hours before departure. Travelers also must present the receipt of an online health registration from the Electronic Travel Information System (ETIS) platform, which must be filled out with their itinerary and uploaded vaccination certificates or positive serology (antibody tests) before travel commences. Unvaccinated travelers who have not recovered from COVID-19 must also register on ETIS, since ETIS receipts, negative PCR test results and boarding authorization must be presented at boarding.

Upon arrival, all passengers must take an Antigen test. Fully vaccinated (in this case at least 8 days past the final dose) and antibody positive travelers do not have to quarantine, but do have to take another test on day 4. Non-vaccinated travelers must quarantine for 10 days at their chosen accommodation with PCR tests taken on day 4 and day 8. Children under six are exempt from testing and quarantine, but unvaccinated children age six and older who are not vaccinated or do not have antibodies must quarantine and the quarantine will be imposed on the entire family. Testing costs are 5,000 XPF ($50) for vaccinated and immune travelers and 12,000 XPF ($121) for non-vaccinated travelers. Details can be found here.

Additionally, all incoming travelers (residents excluded) must provide proof of international travel insurance. Luckily, credit card travel insurance satisfies this requirement. Travelers could use a card like the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card to pay for their airfare and hotel, then provide a copy of the card’s Guide to Benefits as proof of coverage.

All travelers are also advised to wear a mask throughout their stay and abide by specific sanitary measures. Travelers exhibiting symptoms during their stay are advised to self-report and self-isolate in their room until further instruction from local emergency operators.

If you’re itching to travel to French Polynesia, there are lots of options for getting there. Be sure to check out our guide on the best way to get to Tahiti using points and miles. The destination is home to some famous hotels, such as the Conrad Bora Bora Nui and the Hilton Moorea Lagoon Resort & Spa.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for French Polynesia is Level 3: Reconsider Travel and the CDC’s advisory is Level 3: High Level of COVID-19.

Gabon

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 120 hours (5 days) before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: All arriving passengers must pay for and take a second COVID-19 PCR test ($36) and quarantine until receiving the results; a negative test taken within 14 days is required for any travel between cities and provinces.

What’s open: Hotels, restaurants and most businesses—all at reduced capacity

Gabon lifted many pandemic measures in July 2020, but the U.S. Embassy in Gabon reported that restrictions were reimposed and land borders were closed in late January 2021 after cases began to rise. Travelers are being permitted into Gabon by air (there are flights several times per week), but not by land or sea.

Social distancing and masks are mandated at all times, with fines for non-compliance. There is a curfew in the capital of Libreville from 6 p.m. to 5 a.m.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Gabon is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Gabon.

The Gambia

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Travelers from “hotspot” countries where new COVID-19 strains are circulating, including the United States, are now also required to take a rapid Antigen test upon arrival in The Gambia; anyone testing positive must then undergo a PCR test and quarantine at a government-run facility at their own expense; face masks must be worn in public spaces and limits on public gatherings remain in effect.

What’s open: Most hotels, restaurants and businesses

Americans are permitted to visit this West African nation, and according to the U.S Embassy in the Gambia, the government has lifted most restrictions on businesses. All arriving travelers must present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival and travelers from the U.S. will be tested again upon arrival. Anyone without a test that complies with these requirements—such as having a test taken outside of the 72-hour window, rapid test results or a positive result when tested upon arrival—will be subject to mandatory quarantine in government-managed facilities.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for the Gambia is Level 3: Reconsider Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in the Gambia.

Georgia

COVID-19 test required: Yes, unless the traveler has proof of being fully vaccinated

• 72 hours before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Travelers are required to get complete an application form and get a follow-up PCR test at their own expense three days after arrival in Georgia; however, anyone who has traveled to the United Kingdom (Great Britain and Northern Ireland) over the past 14 days must undergo a 12-day mandatory quarantine at their own expense; there is also a nationwide curfew from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. and face masks are required in public spaces.

What’s open: Many hotels and most businesses and public transportation were allowed to reopen in early March 2021.

Americans can now visit the country of Georgia, according to the U.S. Embassy, including those who have documented proof of completed COVID-19 vaccinations and those willing to stay for six months and work from home in the country. However, there is widespread community spread of COVID-19 in Georgia and the U.S. State Department’s current advisory for the country is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Unvaccinated U.S. citizens or residents arriving by air through permitted countries are required to complete an application form, present a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival and take a second PCR test (at their own expense) on the third day after arrival in Georgia. Details and links to requirements are available on the U.S. Embassy website and details on what’s open in Georgia are here.

Related: Work from home in these countries

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Georgia.

Ghana 

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Second COVID-19 test conducted upon arrival; masks required in public spaces.

What’s open: Essential businesses, restaurants and public transportation, with social distancing measures in place; all entertainment venues, beaches and sports facilities remain closed.

Ghana’s Accra Kotoka International Airport reopened for regular international service on Sept. 1, 2020, although the country’s land and sea borders remain closed. According to the U.S. Embassy in Ghana, all passengers arriving by air must present a negative COVID-19 PCR test conducted by an accredited laboratory in the country of origin not more than 72 hours prior to departure.

Additionally, each traveler age five and older must undergo a COVID-19 test conducted at the airport upon arrival. There is a $150 fee per person. Travelers can pay the fee online before departure or pay upon arrival at the airport in Accra. The U.S. Embassy reports that individuals who test positive for COVID-19 upon arrival in Ghana, asymptomatic or not, will be required to undergo mandatory quarantine and treatment at a designated health facility or isolation center, for seven days at the government of Ghana’s expense, and while in quarantine, will undergo a repeat COVID-19 test within 24 hours of arrival, also at the government’s expense.

Ghana’s Ministry of Public Health has mandated the use of face masks in public.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Ghana is Level 3: Reconsider Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Ghana.

Greece

The Acropolis at sunset, Athens, Greece. (Photo by sborisov/Getty Images)

COVID-19 test required: Yes, or proof of vaccination

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Tourists are subject to the country’s ongoing lockdown restrictions (the country still has a significant number of COVID-19 cases), which currently involve a domestic travel ban through at least May 10, 2021 and an 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew; many restrictions are expected to be eased over the next few weeks, with the country’s cafes, bars and restaurants having reopened for outside dining as of May 3, 2021.

Greece said in mid-March 2021 that it would open tourism to fully vaccinated travelers and travelers with proof of COVID-19 antibodies sometime in May 2021. On Wednesday, April 14, the tourism department said Americans are welcome as of May 14. Then, on April 19, 2021, Greece began welcoming U.S. travelers earlier than announced after accelerating its plans. Non-vaccinated Americans are also welcome as long as they have proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival.

Several cruise lines, including Celebrity, have also said they plan to sail the Greek islands from Athens as early as late June 2021.

Related: Greece to open borders in May

All travelers eligible to enter Greece (those from EU countries along with the United States, United Kingdom, Serbia, Israel and the United Arab Emirates) should expect to adhere to Greece’s “five lines of defense” strategy. Those lines include:

  • All visitors must be fully vaccinated (14 days or more past completion) or present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival (children age five and under are exempt from testing)
  • A checking system at Greece’s airports and borders, where passengers can be selected randomly to take a rapid test
  • Any visitor who tests positive for coronavirus will be isolated in a “quarantine hotel”
  • All tourism industry workers must be vaccinated (they will move up the priority list once the most vulnerable Greek citizens get the vaccine)
  • Strict adherence to safety protocols such as wearing masks and social distancing.

All travelers must also complete an online Passenger Locator Form (PLF) at least 48 hours before their travel date. The requirement to self-isolate has been lifted for those with a negative test of proof of completed vaccination. Complete details on entry requirements can be found here.

Check the U.S. Embassy in Greece website for additional information.

Related: Can Americans finally go to Europe?

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Greece is Level 4: Do Not Travel. Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Greece.

Grenada

Saint George-Harbour, Grenada. (Photo by Westend61/Getty Images)
Saint George-Harbour, Grenada. (Photo by Westend61/Getty Images)

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Travelers must obtain authorization, complete online forms, obtain travel/health insurance valid in Grenada, have confirmed reservations at a certified property for at least seven nights and quarantine there until receiving a negative test result (testing is on day 5); as of May 1, 2021, fully vaccinated travelers who arrive with proof of vaccination will be given a test upon arrival and are required to quarantine for just 48 hours, until they receive a negative result.

What’s open: Most businesses, although there are restrictions on restaurants and bars; Grenada has certified certain hotels and activities for tourists.

Like many islands in the Caribbean, Grenada began reopening to foreign tourists on Aug. 1, 2020 — with many restrictions attached. Unfortunately, there are now strict protocols for all visitors, since Grenada is no longer dividing travelers into low-, medium- and high-risk, depending on their country of origin.

Every visitor is required to obtain a Pure Safe Travel Certificate authorizing travel, present a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within three days (72 hours) of arrival (children age 5 and under are exempt from testing), fill out online health forms in advance and have travel insurance valid in Grenada.

All visitors also need to show a confirmed reservation for no fewer than seven nights at a Pure Safe Travel accommodation and quarantine there until taking a PCR test on day 5 (cost: $150, payable when obtaining the Pure Safe Travel Certificate) and getting official clearance to either transfer to the non-quarantine section of their hotel (or to another hotel) and explore the island or return home; fully vaccinated travelers are still required to test up to three days before arrival and will be tested upon arrival in Grenada, then required to quarantine for just 48 hours.

Complete travel requirements can be found here.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Many resorts in the Caribbean have begun offering on-property rapid Antigen and PCR tests to guests prior to departure for the U.S., so check your resort’s policy before traveling.

For more information on requirements and restrictions, visit the U.S. Embassy for Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean’s COVID-19 page for Grenada.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Grenada is Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Grenada.

Guatemala

COVID-19 test required: Yes, unless traveler can provide proof of completed vaccination at least two weeks prior to travel or recovery from COVID-19 within three months of travel

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR or Antigen test required

Other restrictions: All travelers must complete a Health Pass; travelers who have been in the United Kingdom or South Africa within two weeks of arriving in Guatemala may be denied entry or be required to quarantine; there are health checkpoints upon arrival and masks are mandatory in public spaces, including the airport.

What’s open: Most businesses, including hotels, restaurants and bars, have been allowed to reopen with capacity restrictions and limited hours

Guatemala slowly began reopening to tourism on Sept. 18, 2020, and Aurora International Airport is accepting international arrivals. Americans are welcome, but the country will deny entry to any traveler (including American citizens) who have been in Brazil, the United Kingdom or South Africa over the past 14 days.

According to the U.S. Embassy in Guatemala, passengers age 10 and over must present a negative COVID-19 PCR or Antigen test conducted within 72 hours prior to airport check-in for flights to Guatemala. Travelers who are two weeks or more past having completed their COVID-19 vaccination and those who have recovered from COVID-19 within the past three months can provide documented proof (although some air carriers may require a pre-travel test before boarding). All travelers must also complete a Heath Pass. In addition, any non-resident foreigners presenting symptoms of COVID-19 upon arrival may be denied entry to Guatemala.

Guatemalan officials at all borders are required to confirm the entering visitor’s negative coronavirus test result.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Guatemala is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Guatemala.

Guinea

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: All travelers to Guinea must have three masks with them; testing from a specific lab is required for departure.

What’s open: Many businesses, including restaurants and bars, with social distancing measures in place; there is no public transportation system in Guinea.

Gbessia International Airport in Conakry is open and most airlines have resumed their flight schedules, although as cases rose through mid-March 2021, the West African country’s state of health emergency was extended through May 2021, according to the U.S. Embassy in Guinea. Masks must be worn in all public places and there is currently an overnight curfew in the greater Conakry area and N’zerekore.

All travelers to Guinea must provide a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival. They must also carry three masks when entering. If flying into Guinea without a negative PCR test result, travelers will be tested upon arrival and quarantined until results are received. If they receive a positive result, they must quarantine for 14 days and have two negative tests before they are released.

Guinea also requires that all departing travelers be tested by a specific lab, the National Public Health Institute (Agence Nationale de la Sécurité Sanitaire, or ANSS) lab, with the test taken within 72 hours of departure (cost: about $67). This parallels a new U.S. requirement as of Jan. 26, 2021, that everyone aged two and older traveling to the U.S. from Guinea must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Guinea is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Guinea.

Guyana

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure (to avoid testing upon arrival)
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Travelers must fill out an online form and upload test results at least 24 hours before arrival; masks are required in public spaces; there’s a 10:30 p.m. to 4 a.m. curfew.

What’s open: Most hotels and businesses, with restrictions; restaurants are permitted to open for outdoor dining, delivery, drive-thru, curbside pickup and take out until 9:30 p.m.; indoor dining is allowed at 40% capacity with additional restrictions.

Americans can visit Guyana, according to the U.S. Embassy. Travelers must provide a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of their flight to avoid a second test upon arrival (anyone with a test taken within 4 to 7 days of travel will be tested again at a cost of $85; children under age 13 are not subject to this second test). Travelers must also upload test results electronically via an online Passenger Locator Form at least 24 hours before arrival and provide a copy of the test result (in English) to their airline at check-in. Details can be found here.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Guyana is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Guyana.

Haiti

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR or rapid Antigen test required (proof of prior recovery from COVID-19 is also accepted)

Other restrictions: All travelers must fill out a health declaration form; masks are mandatory in all public spaces.

What’s open: Haiti has limited tourism infrastructure compared with other Caribbean islands, but many businesses are open and public transportation is running.

Haiti has reopened its borders to regular international passenger traffic. It has also opened its land borders with the Dominican Republic. However, the U.S. State Department’s advisory for Haiti is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

According to the U.S. Embassy in Haiti, as of Feb. 9, 2021, all travelers to Haiti must present a negative COVID-19 PCR or rapid Antigen test taken within 72 hours of travel to their airline; proof of a prior COVID-19 infection (positive test and documentation from the attending physician) is also allowed.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Haiti.

Honduras

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Travelers must complete government forms and sign an affidavit; masks are required in public spaces.

What’s open: Some hotels and most businesses, with capacity restrictions in place; bars and nightclubs are closed.

Honduras reopened for tourists from all countries on Aug. 17, 2020, with its international airports in operation. Spirit Airlines has resumed service from Fort Lauderdale and Houston, and American Airlines is flying from Miami.

Entering visitors must complete a government registration form and have proof of a negative COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of arrival. They will also be required to sign an affidavit and complete customs forms. Masks are required in all public spaces. Updates on guidelines can be found on the U.S. Embassy in Honduras website. The Embassy also cautions U.S. citizens that the country’s public health system has limited capacity for handling severe/critical cases of COVID-19.

Anyone traveling from the United States who has visited or transited through the United Kingdom or South Africa within the past 21 days, is banned from entering Honduras. The local health authority maintains the right to grant or deny final approval for entry, based on their determination of risk of COVID-19 from any visiting travelers.

Travelers exiting Honduras must also complete another online government pre-check form.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Honduras is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Honduras.

Iceland

(Photo by Anton Petrus/Getty Images)

COVID-19 test required: Not pre-travel, but vaccination or proof of recovery from previous infection are required and travelers will undergo one test upon arrival

Other restrictions: The only U.S. travelers allowed to enter Iceland as of April 6, 2021 are those who have proof of a completed COVID-19 vaccination or recovery from a previous infection with a confirmed antibody test or a positive PCR test more than 14 days old; all travelers must register before arrival in Iceland.

What’s open: Most hotels and businesses, as well as public transportation; the volcanic eruption on the Reykjanes Peninsula near Reykjavik has resulted in some road closures; the famous Blue Lagoon thermal area reopened to visitors on April 16, 2021.

Iceland had discussed welcoming back American tourists as early as June 2020, but then changed its mind and a ban on American tourists remained in effect through March 2021.

TPG’s Andrew Kunesh booked a last-minute flight shortly after the ban was lifted, but before Iceland’s government decided it needed more time to ensure procedures were in place. You can read his account here.

Related: Iceland is finally ready to welcome eligible Americans

As of April 6, 2021, U.S. visitors are welcome, assuming they meet one of two criteria:

  • A completed AstraZeneca, Janssen (Johnson & Johnson), Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine
  • A previous COVID-19 infection, as confirmed with a positive antibody test or positive PCR test older than 14 days

Visitors need to pre-register before travel and can present an official paper or electronic COVID-19 vaccine certificate that includes the traveler’s name, date of birth, date and location of vaccination, vaccine administered and the manufacturer and batch or lot number, as outlined on this page. Per the revised April 6, 2021 guidelines, vaccinated U.S. travelers will be required to take a test upon arrival. FAQs can be found here.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Iceland is Level 3: Reconsider Travel.

There is an active volcanic eruption taking place on the Reykjanes Peninsula near the capital, Reykjavik. Visit the U.S. Embassy in Iceland website and the Icelandair website for additional information.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Iceland.

Ireland

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: 14-day mandatory hotel quarantine upon arrival (testing can end it early); travel between counties is banned; a person arriving in Ireland without a negative PCR test faces a stiff fine or six months in jail.

What’s open: Hotels, but only to essential travelers, not tourists; restaurants are operating on take-out and delivery only; non-essential retail shops are closed.

Ireland is technically open to Americans, but the Irish government advises against it and an ongoing lockdown in response to surging cases since mid-January 2021 has made travel there complicated through at least mid-May 2021, since hotels are not open to those traveling for tourism purposes. All arrivals must also self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival and fill out a Passenger Locator Form attesting to where they will be quarantining—and all arrivals from the U.S. and certain other countries must also undergo mandatory hotel quarantine for 14 days upon arrival.

Ireland re-instituted lockdown on Oct. 21, 2020, which placed the entire country under Level 5 restrictions for six weeks. The country is now back to Level 5, with travel between counties banned and restaurants operating on take-out and delivery only. Hotels are open with restrictions on who can stay there.

As of Jan. 16, 2021, all arrivals from outside Ireland are required to present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 72 hours prior to arrival and self-isolate for 14 days. As of March 26, 2021, travelers from countries listed as “designated states” (which includes the United States) are subject to a 14-day mandatory hotel quarantine, which must be pre-booked and paid for before departure for arrival. This stay can be reduced to 10 days by taking a COVID-19 PCR test on day 10 and receiving a negative result. Travelers must then finish their quarantine at home or another accommodation.

There is a fine of up to $2,860 or six months in jail for arriving without the proper test result upon arrival or for not fulfilling the required quarantine. Details on the latest restrictions can be found here.

Related: Yes you can go to Ireland, but… 

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Ireland is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Ireland.

Jamaica

The rocky side of Negril,Jamaica. Image by narvikk / Getty Images.
The rocky side of Negril, Jamaica (Photo by narvikk / Getty Images)

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before arrival
• PCR or rapid Antigen test required

Other restrictions: Travel authorization is required; arriving visitors will undergo a health screening and risk assessment; guests must stay at their resort and use only certified tours or visit certified attractions; masks and social distancing are mandated in public spaces.

What’s open: Most hotels and resorts within what Jamaica calls its “resilient corridors” are certified to be open, but visitors should expect their movement around the island to be limited.

Jamaica officially reopened for tourism on June 15, 2020 but anyone hoping to plan a vacation there, especially those from a high-risk country (such as the U.S.), needs to request and obtain a travel authorization within 72 hours of their planned travel date.

As of March 11, 2021, all U.S. travelers age 12 and older must present a negative result of a COVID-19 PCR or rapid Antigen test, dated within 72 hours (3 days) of the date of arrival.

All incoming travelers should expect thermal temperature checks upon arrival, and anyone who shows COVID-19 symptoms or feels ill upon arrival will be tested and must quarantine in their hotel room until receiving a negative result. Even after all those procedures, travelers are expected to stay at accommodations within the “resilient corridors” at hotels and resorts certified to accept tourists and adhere to social distancing and face mask policies in public. Travelers are also expected to follow any policies made by tourist and hospitality establishments.

For the latest updates on travel to Jamaica, check here.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Many resorts in the Caribbean have begun offering on-property rapid Antigen and PCR tests to guests prior to departure for the U.S., so check your resort’s policy before traveling.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Jamaica is Level 4: Do Not Travel. Visit the U.S. Embassy in Jamaica’s website for additional information.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Jamaica.

Jordan

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: All travelers must fill out a pre-travel arrivals form, have health insurance valid in Jordan and take a second test upon arrival; curfews vary by days of the week; masks are mandatory in public spaces.

What’s open: Most hotels, restaurants and businesses with social distancing restrictions in place, but the U.S. Embassy recommends travelers avoid in-person dining at restaurants and cafes; there is   a 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew until further notice.

Americans can visit, according to the U.S. Embassy in Jordan, but they must fill out an arrivals form before the flight. They will also need to provide results of a negative PCR test within 72 hours of arrival in Jordan, have health insurance valid in Jordan and take and pay for another coronavirus test upon arrival ($39, children under age five are exempt).

Once in Jordan, U.S. travelers who test negative upon arrival no longer need to undergo mandatory home quarantine for a period of 14 days.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Jordan is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Jordan.

Kenya

Nairobi National Park - Kenya
(Photo by Goddard_Photography/Getty Images)

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 96 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: All arrivals require a visa and face a health screening; departing passengers must also obtain a negative test result before their flight if their destination country requires it; there is a nightly curfew of 10 p.m. through at least May 12, 2021.

What’s open: Hotels, safari lodges, game reserves, restaurants (with closure at 9 p.m.), most businesses and public transportation; there are movement restrictions and closures, with restaurants limited to takeout only and an 8 p.m. curfew in five counties: Nairobi, Kajiado, Machakos, Kiambu, and Nakuru.

Kenya reopened to tourism on Aug. 1, 2020 and Americans can visit. Under the reopening plan, travel in and out of Nairobi is allowed. All visitors need to obtain an e-visa, fill out an online health form (and obtain a QR code for scanning) and present a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 96 hours of travel, according to the U.S. Embassy in Kenya. They’ll also face a health screening on arrival, but are exempted from quarantine. Entry requirements can be found here.

The U.S. Embassy reports that Kenya now also requires departing travelers whose destination requires a test must visit an authorized laboratory in the Trusted Traveler initiative and obtain a negative COVID-19 PCR test and a TT code before they will be allowed to board departing flights. And as of Jan. 26, 2021 everyone aged two and older traveling to the U.S. from Kenya must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

Cases surged in the country this spring and on March 26, 2021, President Kenyatta announced a lockdown for Nairobi and several surrounding counties until further notice to stem the country’s third COVID-19 wave. A mandatory face mask requirement while in public remains in effect and a nightly curfew starting at 10 p.m. has been extended through at least May 12, 2021 (it’s 8 p.m. in five counties: Nairobi, Kajiado, Machakos, Kiambu, and Nakuru). Movement into and out of those five counties has been suspended, bars are closed and restaurants are limited to take-out only.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Kenya is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Kenya.

Related: Country-by-country guide to Africa reopening

Kosovo

COVID-19 test required: Not required for U.S. citizens, but recommended to avoid refusal of boarding by airlines or a sudden change in policy by Kosovo authorities; travelers without a valid test are also required to self-isolate for seven days.

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: A visa is required for entry; all arriving passengers will undergo a health screening; masks are mandated in public spaces and non-compliance can result in hefty fines.

What’s open: Most businesses and public transportation; restaurants and bars are open, but must close at 10 p.m.

Kosovo has reopened to Americans—and Pristina International Airport is welcoming all travelers—but the U.S. Embassy in Kosovo urges citizens not to visit and the U.S. State Department’s advisory is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

All foreign citizens entering Kosovo who come from high-risk countries, according to the official list of ECDC, must provide a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of travel; those permitted to enter Kosovo without a test must self-isolate for seven days. While testing is currently not required for those traveling from the United States, the U.S. Embassy nonetheless recommends a test for all air travelers to Kosovo to avoid quarantine; testing requirements could also evolve with little notice.

Here’s the heath advisory from the U.S. Embassy in Kosovo: “Kosovo remains under a Level 4 Health Advisory – Do Not Travel due to COVID-19. The health situation continues to deteriorate. U.S. citizens report equipment shortages and a lack of space available at local and regional hospitals. It is possible that regional and European land and/or air border restrictions could be re-imposed with little notice.”

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Kosovo.

Kyrgyzstan

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Travelers whose test expires before arrival in the country must test again; masks are required on all public transportation.

What’s open: Many businesses, including malls and markets, are open and public transportation is running.

The U.S. Embassy in Kyrgyzstan says the entry ban for U.S. citizens was lifted in December 2020.
U.S. citizen travelers must enter the country via international airports in Bishkek, Osh or Issyk Kul. Travel across land borders for U.S citizens is not permitted at this time.

Those who do travel to Kyrgyzstan will need to present a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival. If a traveler’s PCR test expires en route due to flight delays or cancellations, they will be required to test again upon arrival at their own expense.

The embassy advises U.S. citizens not to travel to Kyrgyzstan, noting that medical services have struggled to provide adequate care for serious cases of COVID-19 and the healthcare system faces limitations and adequate care may not be available everywhere.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Kyrgyzstan is Level 3: Reconsider Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Kyrgyzstan.

Lebanon

COVID-19 test required: Yes, unless fully vaccinated against or recovered from COVID-19

• 96 hours before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: If not 15 days past vaccination or recovery, travelers must complete a pre-travel medical form, download an app, take a second test required upon arrival, followed by three-day quarantine and a third test. Masks are required at all times outdoors and in public spaces, and all violators will be fined $33 per violation; movement in personal and public vehicles is restricted.

What’s open: Essential shops and services and restaurants with some restrictions; a gradual lifting of restrictions is ongoing; there is a nightly 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew throughout the month of Ramadan.

According to the U.S. Embassy in Lebanon, Americans can travel to the country. With exceptions for those who are 15 days past their completed COVID-19 vaccination or 15 days past recovery from infection, all travelers over the age of 12 must produce a negative PCR test taken within 96 hours of arrival in order to enter the country, take a second PCR test at their own expense (about $50), self-quarantine for three days at their hotel and take a third PCR test after that.

Lebanon had imposed a 24-hour countrywide lockdown, which closed all but essential businesses, through Feb. 8, 2021 when some restrictions were eased. Cases have plateaued, but remain relatively high.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Lebanon is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Lebanon.

The Maldives

(Photo by Ethan Steinberg/The Points Guy)
(Photo by Ethan Steinberg/The Points Guy)

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 96 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Traveler health declaration and proof of a reservation at a hotel or resort are both required; masks are mandatory at the airport, while in transit and in all public spaces.

What’s open: Most resorts; tourists need authorization to island-hop from one island and/or resort to another.

In July 2020, the Maldives announced one of the most liberal opening policies in the world, but according to the U.S. Mission to the Maldives, the island nation has since placed restrictions on tourists. Cases have been increasing throughout April 2021 and certain islands with confirmed COVID-19 cases have been placed under lockdown.

International visitors, including Americans, must now have proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 96 hours of their departure and complete a Traveler Health Declaration within 24 hours prior to travel. A free 30-day tourist visa will be issued upon arrival. Further details can be found here.

Tourists also need proof of reservation with an approved hotel or resort. The latest update on resort openings can be found here.

Emirates Airlines is offering connections through Dubai from major global cities including Chicago. Etihad resumed flights from Abu Dhabi to the Maldives starting in July. Turkish Airlines also started flights in July 2020.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for the Maldives is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in the Maldives.

Mauritius

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 5 to 7 days before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: International flights are currently suspended until at least May 15, 2021; when travel is allowed to resume, all travelers must pre-purchase a travel package, quarantine in-room for 14 days upon arrival and undergo multiple COVID-19 PCR tests; anyone who has visited certain countries within 14 days is banned until further notice; mask mandates remain in effect throughout the island.

What’s open: Most businesses, with social distancing and capacity restrictions as outlined by the government, and public transportation on a limited basis. (Note: On March 10, 2021, the country went into an island-wide lockdown that closed beaches, shops and restaurants through April 30, 2021, with an easing of confinement beginning on May 1).

Travel is not currently possible here, since the Indian Ocean island of Mauritius has suspended all international flights into the country until at least May 15, 2021.

Mauritius began lifting restrictions in June 15, 2020, and according to the U.S. Embassy in Mauritius, as of Oct. 1, 2020 Americans had been allowed to visit—but only long-stay arrivals who purchased a travel package would be approved. Travelers also needed to present a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 5 to 7 days of travel and undergo a mandatory 14-day quarantine in-room at an establishment recognized by the authorities. These rules are expected to be in effect through at least May 31, 2021 and all travel alerts can be found here.

The U.S State Department’s advisory for Mauritius is Level 3: Reconsider Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Mauritius.

Mexico

Subject: A panoramic view of the hotel district of Cancun at sunset. A popular tourist beach destination. The Yucatan Peninsula and the Riviera Maya in Mexico is a well developed vacation location with numerous hotels and entertainment districts. (Image by YinYang/iStock / Getty Images Plus)
The hotel district of Cancun at sunset (Image by YinYang/iStock /Getty Images Plus)

COVID-19 test required: No

Other restrictions: Health checks upon arrival; capacity restrictions and face masks required in some public spaces.

What’s open: Most hotels, resorts, restaurants and businesses; beaches and many tourist attractions are also open.

Mexico eagerly flung open its doors to U.S. tourists—without any testing required for entry. The country began a slow regional opening on June 29, 2020 and many coronavirus restrictions have been lifted. At first, it was just beach destinations like Cancun, but now all Mexican airports are open to Americans. However, widespread community transmission remains a current concern and the government has established a federal “stoplight” system that limits activities and capacity in some regions.

Enhanced screening and cleaning procedures are in effect. There are also health checks at all airports, but no testing requirements upon arrival. However, as of Jan. 26, 2021, everyone aged two and older traveling to the U.S. from Mexico is required to show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights; documented proof from a licensed healthcare provider of recovery from the virus within the past 90 days will also be accepted.

Many Mexico resorts have begun to offer on-property rapid Antigen and PCR tests for guests returning to the U.S.

Mexico saw a major surge in cases in late December 2020 and early January 2021 following an influx of tourists. Community spread continues throughout the country, but capacity restrictions were recently relaxed in many regions. Should you travel to Mexico? For more information, check here.

The U.S. State Department’s travel advisory for Mexico is Level 4: Do Not Travel. According to the U.S. Embassy in Mexico, community transmission remains widespread. No states were deemed “red” under Mexico’s stoplight system through May 9, 2021, but six states (including Mexico City and Quintana Roo) are “orange,” requiring capacity restrictions of 50% in hotels and restaurants.

The U.S.–Mexico land border is closed to nonessential travel until at least May 21, 2021.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Mexico.

Morocco

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Test results must be presented in printed form; confirmed reservations with a hotel or travel agency or invitation from a Moroccan company to do business are also required

What’s open: Flights are very limited; some hotels, restaurants and shops are open, with a daily curfew through the end of Ramadan (likely to be extended).

Morocco recently extended its strict state of emergency until May 10, 2021 and also has suspended flights from more than two dozen countries, making tourism here challenging. According to the U.S. Embassy in Morocco, Americans are among citizens of several dozen countries currently allowed to enter the country without a visa, but anyone age 11 and older must have a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of departure and present it in printed form at airport check-in and upon arrival in Morocco.

Commercial flights remain very limited (Royal Air Maroc flights between New York’s JFK Airport and Casablanca and Casablanca and Washington Dulles International Airport). Masks are mandatory in flight and in all public spaces.

Travelers are limited to those who have confirmed reservations with a Moroccan hotel or travel agency or an invitation from a Moroccan company for business purposes, according to the U.S. Embassy. Domestic travel within Morocco requires a travel authorization letter from local officials, but apparently, a hotel reservation can be all the documentation you may need.

The government of Morocco also announced additional measures designed to curb the spread of COVID-19: a nationwide curfew between 8 p.m. and 6 a.m. through at least May 14, 2021 (likelyto be extended); a daily closing of cafes, restaurants, shops and grocery stores at 7 p.m.; and a ban on all public and private gatherings and parties.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Morocco is Level 3: Reconsider Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Morocco.

Mozambique

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Visas or resident permits are required for entry; tourists must have a confirmed hotel booking and return ticket; all travelers face a health screening upon arrival.

What’s open: Most businesses, shops and restaurants are open, subject to curfews and early closures; public transportation is running; museums and other cultural institutions are closed; bars and beaches are closed.

Limited international flights are available to Mozambique, where enhanced mitigation measures were recently extended through May 25, 2021. Arriving travelers age 12 and older are required to present a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of departure. There is health screening upon arrival, but quarantine isn’t required with a negative test result.

According to the U.S Embassy in Mozambique, “For travelers arriving for tourism purposes only, visas are available upon arrival with proof of a return ticket and hotel booking. Please be aware that U.S. citizens have been denied entry for not having obtained the proper type of visa in advance. Obtaining your visa in advance from the Mozambican Embassy in Washington, DC is strongly encouraged.” Non-Mozambiqan business travelers must seek authorization to enter the country from the Ministry of the Interior, according to the U.S. Embassy.

Public transportation is running and face masks are required. In the Greater Maputo area (Maputo, Matola, Marracuene, and Boane) and provincial capitals, a curfew is in place from 10 p.m. to 4 a.m.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Mozambique is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Mozambique.

Namibia

COVID-19 test required: Yes, if vaccination is not yet complete

• 7 days before arrival
• PCR or rapid antigen test required

Other restrictions: All travelers must complete a health questionnaire; even travelers with proof of vaccination must provide a negative test result.

What’s open: Most businesses (hotels, safari lodges and camps, restaurants, shops); public transportation is running.

Namibia has been open for international tourism since Sept. 1, 2020, although most of its land borders are currently closed.

Tourists, including Americans, are allowed to fly to Hosea Kutako International Airport (WDH), and according to the U.S. Embassy in Namibia, they must have a negative COVID-19 PCR or rapid Antigen test result taken within 7 days of arrival and fill out a health questionnaire. Even travelers who have proof of vaccination must provide a negative test result. Those whose test result is more than 7 days old will need to undergo a day-of-arrival quarantine until getting a negative result on a second test before being allowed to move freely in the country. Children under the age of five are exempt.

There is a nationwide curfew in Namibia from 10 p.m. to 4 a.m.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

Related: Country-by-country guide to Africa reopening

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Namibia is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Namibia.

Nepal

COVID-19 test required: Yes, unless fully vaccinated

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Domestic and international flights have been suspended from May 5-14, 2021 to help curb outbreaks in Kathmandu and several cities near the border with India; when flights resume, U.S. travelers need a visa, a hotel booking reservation and proof of insurance; all travelers must also take a PCR test upon arrival and quarantine until receiving the result.

What’s open: Most hotels, restaurants and businesses have resumed operations; the government, however, did enact a lockdown of Kathmandu from April 29, 2021 to May 14, 2021 to slow the city’s COVID-19 infection rate.

Nepal, which had remained mostly closed to tourism, reopened in late 2020 to some travelers arriving via air, according to the Kathmandu Post. Americans are now allowed to visit, but the suspension of international and domestic flights will complicate travel through at least mid-May 2021.

According to the U.S. Embassy in Nepal, the government of Nepal has resumed issuing tourist visas. and travelers should obtain a tourist entry visa from a Nepali diplomatic mission abroad or obtain a pre-approval /recommendation from the concerned ministry for ensuring their on-arrival visa. For more information, contact the Embassy of Nepal in Washington, D.C. Further information on obtaining a tourist visa is also available from Nepal’s Department of Immigration.

The U.S. Embassy website notes that U.S. travelers to Nepal need the following:

  • Results of a negative COVID-19 PCR negative taken within 72 hours of boarding or a document showing complete vaccination against COVID-19 (children five and under age five are exempt from testing)
  • A visa to Nepal or recommendation letter from the Department of Tourism or Nepal Tourism Board to participate in tourism activities within Nepal
  • A hotel booking confirmation or guarantee of accommodation
  • Proof of travel insurance that covers emergency search, rescue and treatment, among others, for the duration of their travel
  • The barcode generated from the online application of the Online International Travel Arrival Form.

PCR testing is also required upon arrival and travelers must quarantine until receiving their negative result. Failure to wear a mask when outdoors may result in arrest and a fine.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Nepal is Level 3: Reconsider Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Nepal.

Nicaragua

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Limited flight options; tourist visa is required; pre-departure airline form must be filled out; health screenings upon arrival.

What’s open: Most businesses are open and there is no curfew.

Nicaragua never really shut down. There were never any stay-at-home or social-distancing orders and because of these relaxed rules, there have been questions about how many cases Nicaragua actually has. The Nicaraguan government also never officially implemented any travel restrictions, but its borders and airports effectively closed until October 2020; only limited flights (on Avianca and Copa) have since resumed and U.S. carriers have not set dates for flights to resume.

The U.S. Embassy in Nicaragua notes that the Nicaraguan government has yet to officially impose any domestic travel restrictions or national quarantine policies. The embassy also states that U.S. travelers are allowed to enter Nicaragua, and a negative COVID-19 test result taken up to 72 hours of travel is required for entry. Travelers should also be prepared for additional health screenings, although the embassy says that travelers are not officially required to produce any additional health documentation to enter Nicaragua unless they are traveling from a country with a known yellow fever risk.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Nicaragua is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Nicaragua.

Niger

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before arrival (and 72 hours before departure from Niger)
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Health screening upon arrival; 7-day self-quarantine for travelers staying more than 14 days.

What’s open: Restaurants, markets, stores and public transportation; bars, nightclubs, and performance venues have been closed since Dec. 24, 2020.

The government of Niger’s state of emergency has continued into 2021, according to the U.S. Embassy in Niger. Travelers arriving into the West African country must present a negative COVID-19 PCR test dated within 72 hours of arrival and undergo a health screening. Travelers who plan to stay in Niger for more than 14 days must also provide precise home/accommodation information and self-quarantine for seven days before getting tested again (free) at a specified COVID-19 testing facility.

The U.S. Embassy also reports that travelers departing Niger by air must provide a negative COVID-19 test dated within 72 hours of departure. This parallels a new U.S. requirement as of Jan. 26, 2021 that requires everyone aged two and older traveling to the U.S. from Niger to show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights.

Social distancing rules are in effect in Niger and it is mandatory to wear a face mask in public spaces in Niamy.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Niger is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Niger.

Nigeria

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 96 hours (4 days) before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Self-isolate for 7 days and pay for a second test

What’s open: Most businesses and public transportation (at 50% capacity)

Nigeria reopened its airports on July 8, 2020 after months of closure. Abuja, Lagos, Kano, Port Harcourt, Owerri and Maiduguri airports all reopened for domestic flights in July 2020, and international flights resumed in August 2020.

According to the U.S. Embassy in Nigeria, arriving international passengers over the age of 10 must have proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 96 hours (four days) of departure. A Quarantine Protocol issued in September requires all international visitors to register via the Nigeria International Travel Portal, upload test results prior to travel, and then self-isolate and pay for another test seven days after arrival in Nigeria and continue self-isolating until receiving a negative result (typically in 24-48 hours).

Travelers from the United Kingdom and South Africa have been subject to additional protocols since Dec. 28, 2020.

The country saw a surge in COVID-19 infections in December 2020, resulting in increased restrictions. Cases have since been substantially reduced, but a curfew remains in place from 12 a.m. to 4 a.m. Mask wearing is inconsistent and in early March 2021, a new COVID-19 variant was detected in the country.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Nigeria is Level 3: Reconsider Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Nigeria.

North Macedonia

(Screenshot courtesy TAV Airports)
(Screenshot courtesy TAV Airports)

COVID-19 test required: No

Other restrictions: Arriving passengers must undergo thermal scanning; face masks and social distancing are required in public spaces, including shops and public transportation.

What’s open: Most hotels and businesses; there is a 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew through at least May 15, 2021, with restaurants, cafes and bars allowed to offer limited outdoor seating, take-out and delivery only.

North Macedonia is now open to all tourists. Skopje International Airport (SKP) and Ohrid St. Paul the Apostle Airport (OHD) opened on July 1, 2020. But as of March 10, 2021, North Macedonia has mandated a 14-day quarantine for all travelers arriving from countries in Africa. There are also restrictions on public gatherings and social distancing, with a nationwide state of crisis is in effect through June 30, 2021.

All passengers will face temperature screening, but there are no quarantine or testing requirements. Check the U.S. Embassy in North Macedonia website for updates.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for North Macedonia Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in North Macedonia.

Oman

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: A second COVID-19 test upon arrival (must be pre-booked) and use of an app are required; 7-day quarantine is mandatory before a final test; travelers must have health insurance valid in Oman; travelers should carry tests results with them and masks must be worn in public spaces.

What’s open: Most businesses and public transportation; shops, restaurants and cafes are open at 50% capacity; and there is a 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew ( 7 p.m. to 4 a.m. during May 8-15, 2021) until further notice.

Americans can again visit Oman, according to the U.S. Embassy in Oman. On April 8, 2021, entry into the Sultanate was restricted to Omani citizens and residency holders only, but the ban has been lifted. As of April 24, 2021, however, travelers originating in 14 countries—Sudan, Lebanon, South Africa, Brazil, Nigeria, Guinea, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Ethiopia, the United Kingdom, India, Pakistan and Bangladesh—or who passed through them in the past 14 days, cannot enter Oman.

Travelers need proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of entering the Sultanate through Muscat International Airport (MCT), Salalah Airport (SLL), Sohar Airport (OHS), and Duqm Airport (DQM). Travelers must also take a COVID-19 PCR test upon arrival and quarantine for seven days. A third PCR test is required on day eight before the quarantine can end. Each test costs OMR25 ($65).

PCR tests and hotel quarantine accommodations must be pre-booked separately. Mandatory PCR tests must be pre-booked on the Tarassud+ mobile app prior to arrival in Oman. The app serves to gather all relevant passenger details and gives the users secure and easy access to pay for their PCR tests online. Quarantine hotel accommodations must be booked on the Sahala platform before arrival in Oman; airlines are required to check that travelers hold a confirmed hotel booking. All travelers are also required to have travel health insurance that is valid in Oman.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Oman is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Oman.

Pakistan

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: A visa is required for entry; travelers also need to download an app and undergo a thermal scan upon arrival; masks are required in public spaces.

What’s open: Most businesses are open, but commercial areas identified as “hot spots” by authorities could be shut down without advance notice or subject to capacity restrictions; public transportation is operating.

Pakistan has reopened for Americans, however, the U.S. State Department’s Level 4: Do Not Travel advisory says, “Do not travel to Pakistan due to COVID-19, terrorism and sectarian violence.” The country experienced record high COVID-19 cases and deaths in April 2021 and announced it would reduce international flights by 80% for 15 days (May 5-20, 2021).

According to the U.S. Embassy in Pakistan, Americans wishing to travel to Pakistan will need a visa, and as visitors from a Category B country, must show a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 72 hours of departure from the U.S. They will also need to download and install a Pass Track app and face health screenings on arrival. Guidelines can be found here.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Pakistan.

Panama

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 48 hours before departure
• PCR or Antigen test required

Other restrictions: All travelers must sign an electronic affidavit prior to their flight; travelers who arrive without valid test results can take a rapid test after arrival; a positive result requires a 14-day quarantine; some movement restrictions are in place throughout the country; masks are required any time you leave your hotel room or home.

What’s open: Most hotels, restaurants and businesses with capacity restrictions; beaches are open from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Panama, which reopened its airport back in late August 2020, is now in a phased reopening across the country. Tourism returned on Oct. 12, 2020, but widespread infections in late 2020 and early 2021 and a phased reopening have slowed progress. The U.S. Embassy in Panama notes on its website that the U.S. State Department’s advisory for Panama is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Panama currently requires travelers to register via an online health affidavit and present a negative COVID-19 PCR test or Antigen test taken within 48 hours of departure. Anyone unable to obtain a negative coronavirus test within that time frame can take a COVID-19 rapid test at the airport (cost: $50) and if the result is positive they must quarantine for 14 days at a designated hotel-hospital. A negative test on day 7 will allow for release, but a positive test mean quarantine continues for 14 days or until a negative test result.

Panama also said on Dec. 21, 2020, that it was temporarily banning anyone who has stayed in or transited through the United Kingdom and South Africa within the past 20 days due to the COVID-19 variants in both countries. The ban remains in effect. As of March 31, 2021, travelers who have passed through any country in South America must test upon arrival (in addition to the pre-travel test) and even those who test negative must self-isolate for three days and be tested again at the end of the quarantine.

Panama has also instituted a midnight curfew nationwide and movement restrictions that vary by region.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Panama.

Paraguay

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before arrival
• PCR or NAAT test required

Other restrictions: Visa upon arrival is available; arriving travelers must have international health insurance and face a temperature screening in the airport; face masks are recommended when in public spaces and required in supermarkets, retail stores, pharmacies, gas stations and other places where people gather.

What’s open: Most businesses and public transportation, with capacity and social distancing restrictions per the government’s phased re-opening; there is a 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. nationwide curfew.

The government of Paraguay began easing its internal lockdown last fall and on Oct. 2, 2020, reopened Silvio Pettirossi International Airport. Some regular commercial flights then resumed in November 2020. However, COVID-19 cases in the country have surged in March and April 2021, reaching record highs, and new restrictions were put in place through at least May 10, 2021.

According to the U.S. Embassy in Paraguay, the country ended its required quarantine for foreigners on Nov. 16, 2020, but everyone age 10 and older entering Paraguay must present a negative COVID-19 PCR or NAAT test result taken within 72 hours before arrival. In addition, the embassy reports that travelers who contracted and recovered from COVID-19 in the last 14-90 days also may enter with documentation and without a current test.

All travelers who are not residents of Paraguay are also required to have international medical insurance that covers COVID-19 and must complete a Ministry of Health form within 24 hours of entering the country.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Paraguay is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Paraguay.

Peru

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure (issued within 72 hours)
• PCR or Antigen test required

Other restrictions: 14-day quarantine is required (with Antigen testing option upon arrival to avoid quarantine with a negative result); domestic flights are limited; face masks and social distancing are required in public spaces.

What’s open: Most hotels and restaurants and some businesses, but at limited capacity depending on the region’s alert level; Machu Picchu is open at a reduced capacity.

After a prolonged state of emergency, Peru began Phase 4 of its economic reactivation on Oct. 1, 2020, including the resumption of a limited number of international flights. The U.S. Embassy in Peru reports that direct flights from the U.S. have resumed and Americans are welcome to enter Peru, although pre-travel testing is required for all visitors, a negative Antigen test result upon arrival is required to avoid a 14-day quarantine, regional restrictions are in effect, domestic flights are currently limited and the State Department’s advisory is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

All passengers age 12 and older must present a negative COVID-19 PCR or Antigen test result issued within 72 hours of departure for Peru and complete an online electronic Affidavit of Health and Geolocation Authorization administered by Migraciones. To avoid a 14-day quarantine, arriving travelers can submit to an Antigen test at the airport; if negative, they don’t have to quarantine.

The U.S. Embassy suggests travelers confirm requirements with their airline prior to departure since they could be subject to change. Peru’s government has also declared the restriction of all non-resident foreign passengers originating in Brazil, the U.K., and South Africa from entering Peru through May 9, 2021.

With cases rising, Peru instituted regional risk metrics of High, Very High and Extreme, based on COVID-19 risk—Lima and Cusco have been listed as Extreme through at least May 9, 2021, subject to review every 15 days. Restrictions and nightly curfews of 8 p.m. or 9.p.m. remain in effect in many regions.

Machu Picchu, one of Peru’s top tourist destinations, is open at reduced capacity with strict social distancing measures in place.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Peru.

Puerto Rico

Culebra, Puerto Rico. (Photo by Douglas Hodgkins/EyeEm/Getty)
Culebra, Puerto Rico (Photo by Douglas Hodgkins/EyeEm/Getty)

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Arriving passengers will face health screenings and could be subject to additional testing; masks are required in all public spaces (with a $100 fine for on-compliance); an island-wide curfew of 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. is in effect.

What’s open: Most hotels and resorts; public beaches and golf courses have reopened and water activities are allowed with reduced capacity and appropriate social distancing; restaurants are open at 30% capacity, but self-serve buffets are not allowed; casinos and hotel pools are operating at 30% capacity; some attractions are open, but access to Old San Juan between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. (curfew hours) is limited to residents and guests of Old San Juan hotels; common areas of all hotels close at 10 p.m. until further notice.

Puerto Rico, an unincorporated territory of the U.S., has officially reopened to all international travelers. However, cases surged throughout April 2021, leading to a tightening of capacity restrictions and an earlier curfew.

In order to visit, all travelers, including Americans, must complete an online Travel Declaration available on the Puerto Rico Health Department’s online portal. Passengers must present a negative molecular COVID-19 PCR test taken no more than 72 hours prior. To receive an Airport Exit Confirmation QR Code, they must upload their negative test to the online portal before travel.

As of April 28, 2021, passengers who do not upload negative test results to the online portal before arrival face a $300 fine; those awaiting results have 48 hours to upload the results and the fine will be dismissed; those who arrive without having taken a test are required to test on the island within 48 hours to have the fine dismissed. Details are here.

Upon arrival at San Juan International Airport, travelers will be subject to health screenings, including possible additional COVID-19 testing. You could be asked to self-quarantine for 14 days, regardless of symptoms.

A note for travelers returning from Puerto Rico: The U.S. began requiring proof of a negative COVID-19 viral test on Jan. 26, 2021, for all international arrivals by air, but passengers traveling back to the U.S. mainland from Puerto Rico will not be required to have taken a test.

Related: Everything you need to know about Puerto Rico reopening

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advisory for Puerto Rico is Level 4: Very High Level of COVID-19.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Puerto Rico.

Related: Your points and miles guide to Puerto Rico

Rwanda

A gorilla in the Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. (Photo by Mint Images Art Wolfe / Getty Images)
A gorilla in the Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. (Photo by Mint Images Art Wolfe / Getty Images)

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure to Rwanda (and 72 hours before departure from Rwanda)
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Testing upon arrival and 24-hour quarantine with another test before release; testing is required for hotel stays and visits to national parks; testing is again required for departure; face masks are required nationwide when in public spaces.

What’s open: Most businesses, hotels and public transportation, as well as all three national parks, including Volcanoes National Park; restaurants are open with restricted hours and capacity; bars are closed.

Rwanda had been doing a relatively good job controlling the coronavirus outbreak since reopening to commercial flights on Aug. 1, 2020, although cases did spike in January 2021. Recently, the U.S. State Department returned its advisory for the country to Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution.

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According to the U.S. Embassy in Rwanda, all arriving passengers are required to fill out a Passenger Locator Form and upload a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours (three days) of departure for Rwanda. All travelers are also subject to testing upon arrival (at a cost of $60) and must spend 24 hours in a designated transit hotel; some travelers (but not business travelers or tourists headed to national parks) may need to undergo a seven-night quarantine.

VisitRwanda’s reopening guidance says, “For passengers entering Rwanda, a second PCR test will be conducted upon arrival, with results delivered within 24 hours, during which time they will remain in designated hotels at their own cost.” International tourists scheduled to visit national parks are not required to undergo further quarantine, but will be required to present negative test results upon checking into hotels or entering national parks. Details can be found here.

Related: Visiting Rwanda during COVID-19

Travelers departing Rwanda must also test negative within 72 hours of their flight. They are encouraged to book and pay for their tests at least two days prior to their return flight. As of Jan. 26, 2021 everyone aged two and older traveling to the U.S. from Rwanda must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights.

For information on testing in Rwanda, check this FAQ section on VisitRwanda.com.

Rwanda is offering visas on arrival as well for all nationalities. There are a number of additional planning resources available at VisitRwanda.com. All three major national parks in the country are open but visitors will have to test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours of visiting. You can even book a trip to see the endangered mountain gorillas of Volcanoes National Park.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Rwanda.

Saba

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before arrival
• PCR or Antigen test required

Other restrictions: As of May 1, 2021, all travelers must still apply to visit Saba, but non-vaccinated U.S. travelers are required to undergo in-room hotel quarantine for five days (reduced from 10 days), with monitoring via text messages and phone calls and testing on day 5; fully vaccinated travelers need to test before travel, but do not have to quarantine; health insurance valid in Saba that covers COVID-19 is also required.

What’s open: Hotels and restaurants, but subject to restrictions.

International travelers have been welcome to apply for permission to visit the Dutch Caribbean island of Saba since Nov. 1, 2020—but new rules went into effect on May 1, 2021. The U.S. is considered a high-risk country, so all travelers from the U.S. must still seek permission and present a negative COVID-19 PCR or Antigen test result taken within 72 of arrival in Saba. Those who are non-vaccinated must also undergo a 5-day quarantine in their hotel room, with monitoring by local authorities and an Antigen test administered on day 5. If the room has a balcony or patio, travelers can sit outside, but there will be no daily housekeeping services and all room-service food will be left outside the door.

Fully vaccinated travelers to Saba will still need to apply for permission to visit, but will be able to skip quarantine. All visitors from high-risk countries, which includes the United States, will continue to have to present negative results of a pre-travel test taken within 72 hours of arrival no matter what their vaccination status. More details can be found on the government’s website.

Travelers arriving in Saba via St. Maarten must also follow the travel requirements for St. Maarten.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Saba is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

St. Kitts and Nevis

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Travelers must get approval from the island to travel (or boarding a flight will be denied), have a confirmed reservation at a certified hotel, undergo a health screening upon arrival, download a contract tracing app, stay at their hotel property for seven nights, and test prior to departure or before being allowed to book select excursions; a test on day 14 allows visitors to explore freely; masks are required in public spaces; new requirements (as of May 1, 2021) for fully vaccinated travelers require just a nine-day “vacation in place” hotel quarantine.

What’s open: Certified hotels, resorts and certified activities/excursions for tourists; restaurants are open with capacity restrictions.

St. Kitts and Nevis began a phased reopening on Oct. 31, 2020. According to the St. Kitts and Nevis tourism board, Americans wanting to visit need to take the following steps:

  • Complete the entry form here to receive travel approval and submit a negative COVID-19 PCR test completed within 72 hours of your flight from an accredited laboratory as well as confirmation of a hotel reservation at a certified hotel.
  • Undergo a health screening at the airport which includes a temperature check and a health questionnaire.
  • Download the SKN COVID-19 contact tracing mobile app (to be used for the first 14 days (or less) of travel.
  • Days 1-7: Visitors are free to move about the hotel property, interact with other guests and partake in hotel activities. Visitors staying 7 nights or less are required to take a PCR test ($150) two days prior to departure at their hotel, at the nurse’s station, per a directive from the Ministry of Health. If positive before departure, the traveler will be required to stay in isolation at their cost at their respective hotel. If negative, travelers will proceed with departure on their respective date.
  • Days 8 -14: Visitors staying longer than 7 days will undergo a PCR test (visitors’ cost is US $150) on day 7. If the traveler tests negative on day 7, they will be allowed, through the hotel’s tour desk, to book select excursions and access select destination sites.
  • Visitors staying 14 days or longer will also need to undergo a PCR-test (visitors’ cost is US $150) on day 14, and if they test negative the traveler will be allowed to integrate into the St. Kitts and Nevis community.

Note: As of May 1, 2021, fully vaccinated travelers (those who are at least two weeks past their final dose) are required to complete the entry form and upload negative PCR test results, but will be required to “vacation in place” at their approved resort for nine days, with a test on day 9 allowing them to explore the island.

One other note: Americans will need to stay at one of eight approved hotels for international visitors. Good news? They include the Park Hyatt St. Kitts, the Four Seasons Nevis and the St. Kitts Marriott Resort.

For complete details on travel requirements, visit the St. Kitts and Nevis Tourism website.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Many resorts in the Caribbean have begun offering on-property rapid Antigen and PCR tests to guests prior to departure for the U.S., so check your resort’s policy before traveling.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for St. Kitts and Nevis is Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution. Visit the website of the U.S. Embassy in Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean, which overseas St. Kitts and Nevis, for additional information.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in St. Kitts and Nevis.

St. Lucia

The Pitons on St. Lucia. Image by Paul Baggaley / Getty Images.
The Pitons on St. Lucia. (Image by Paul Baggaley / Getty Images)

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 5 days (120 hours) before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Visitors must book a stay in a certified property, complete the online Travel Registration Form, upload test results before departure and present a Travel Authorization email confirmation upon arrival; once in St. Lucia, travelers will undergo a health check and must remain at their property for 14 days with some certified activities allowed; masks and social distancing are required island-wide.

What’s open: Most resorts and activities have been certified for tourists; there is a 9 p.m. to 4 a.m. curfew.

Flights to Hewanorra International Airport (UVF) have resumed and St. Lucia is again welcoming U.S. visitors—but they must remain at their certified accommodation and only participate in certified tours and acrivities.

Travelers age five and older (from outside St. Lucia’s designated Travel Bubble) are required to present certified proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within five days of boarding their flights to UVF (this was reduced from seven days as of Feb. 10, 2021). All International travelers, including those from the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom, must pre-book their stay at a certified property, complete an online Travel Registration Form and then upload the negative test results before travel. All travelers must also present the Travel Authorization email they receive or they may be denied boarding.

Once they arrive, travelers will undergo health checks and temperatures will be taken. All international visitors from outside the St. Lucia Travel Bubble will be required to remain at their COVID-19-certified property and only participate in certified tours and activities for the duration of their stay; after 14 days, visitors be able to move around the island freely. Masks and social distancing will be required for the duration of the stay.

For complete details, visit the International Arrivals page on the St. Lucia Tourism website.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Many resorts in the Caribbean have begun offering on-property rapid Antigen and PCR tests to guests prior to departure for the U.S., so check your resort’s policy before traveling.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for St. Lucia is Level 4: Do Not Travel. Visit the U.S. Embassy for Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean‘s website for additional information.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in St. Lucia.

St. Maarten

American Airlines plane landing at Sint Maarten Airport (SXM) in January of 2017. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
American Airlines plane landing at Sint Maarten Airport (SXM) in January of 2017. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 120 hours before departure for travelers from the U.S. (72 hours from other countries) for PCR test or 48 hours for rapid Antigen test
• PCR or rapid Antigen test required

Other restrictions: Travelers need to complete a health declaration, apply for St. Maarten’s health insurance, and self-monitor for symptoms for 14 days.

What’s open: Most resorts, businesses and attractions; tourists can cross from the Dutch side of the island to French St. Martin.

Dutch Sint Maarten is open and welcoming U.S. and other travelers arriving at Princess Juliana International Airport.

Before arrival, travelers from high-risk countries (which includes the U.S.) are required to follow several protocols, including submitting the results of a COVID-19 RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours of the day of travel. This was reduced from 120 hours as of Feb. 12, 2021, but both the St. Maarten Health Authorization System website and the U.S. Consulate General in Curacao, which oversees Dutch St. Maarten, report the 120-hour requirement remains for Americans.

Americans can also now opt to present the results of any FDA-approved rapid Antigen test done within 48 hours.

All arriving passengers must also submit a health declaration form in advance (confirmation must be shown at immigration). And as of Jan. 11, 2021, all travelers must also apply for the St. Maarten Visitor Protection Plan, which provides health insurance covering COVID-19 testing and treatment while on the island. It costs $30 for travelers age 15 and older and $10 for those 14 and under. Travelers from high-risk countries (which includes the U.S.) are also expected to follow, including daily self-monitoring and reporting of symptoms for 14 days.

Related coverage: Plane-Spotting Time; St. Maarten is Now Open Again

St. Maarten has travel ban is in effect since Jan. 27, 2021 for anyone, including U.S. citizens, who have been in a banned country (including  South Africa, India, Pakistan and a dozen South American countries) over the past 14 days.

For more information on travel requirements, check the St. Maarten Health Authorization website.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Many resorts in the Caribbean have begun offering on-property rapid Antigen and PCR tests to guests prior to departure for the U.S., so check your resort’s policy before traveling.

The U.S. State Department advisory is Level 3: Reconsider Travel for St. Maarten and Level 4: Do Not Travel for French St. Martin.

St. Vincent & the Grenadines

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Travelers must fill out a health form prior to departure for St. Vincent, may be subject to testing upon arrival and must quarantine at an approved (and pre-paid for) hotel for 14 days; additional testing and monitoring is also required; masks are required in all public spaces.

What’s open: Certified resorts and most businesses; restaurants may have capacity or outdoor-dining-only restrictions.

The La Soufrière volcano on St. Vincent erupted on April 9, 2021, forcing many island residents to evacuate. The eruption has devastated nearby areas and disrupted life on the island.

Related: Cruise lines send ships to help evacuate St. Vincent as volcano threatens island

St. Vincent and the Grenadines began reopening on July 1, 2020. Visitors from all countries are welcome, but everyone must fill out an entry form within 24 hours of departure for the islands. Americans face especially strict requirements, which were updated as of Feb. 8, 2021.

All travelers from high-risk countries, which includes the U.S., need to show proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours (three days) of arrival. All high-risk travelers may also be tested on arrival. They are also required to quarantine at an approved hotel for 14 nights and show proof of a fully-paid reservation for those 14 nights. Then, retesting is required between day four and day seven along with ongoing monitoring by a Port Health Officer.

Travelers who have proof that they are fully vaccinated (at least four weeks after the final dose) must still have a pre-travel COVID-19 test 72 hours before arrival and be tested upon arrival, but are only required to quarantine for 7 nights and be retested on day 5.

For more information on entry requirements, click here.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Many resorts in the Caribbean have begun offering on-property rapid Antigen and PCR tests to guests prior to departure for the U.S., so check your resort’s policy before traveling.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for St. Vincent is Level 4: Do Not Travel. Visit the U.S. Embassy in Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean, which oversees St. Vincent, for additional information.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

São Tomé and Principe

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 120 hours (5 days) before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Travelers must take a second PCR test upon arrival and quarantine until receiving the results; masks are required in public spaces.

What’s open: Most businesses; markets have restricted hours.

São Tomé and Príncipe, a lush and tropical island nation located off the coast of western Africa in the Gulf of Guinea, released a three-phase plan for reopening the country beginning in June 2020. Currently, travelers are welcome, but there are social distancing restrictions in place and people are encouraged to remain at home for all but essential business.

According to the U.S. Embassy (which overseas Gabon as well as São Tomé and Principe), all arriving passengers must present a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 120 hours (5 days) of arrival. Arriving passengers must also take a PCR at the airport ($36) and quarantine until receiving the results.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for São Tomé and Príncipe is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in São Tomé and Príncipe.

Senegal

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 120 hours (5 days) hours before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Passenger Locator form required and face masks mandatory in all public spaces.

What’s open: Hotels, most businesses and public transportation; restaurants, casinos and beaches are open with social distancing measures in place; a mandatory mask order remains in place countrywide.

International flights have resumed to Senegal, but most land and sea borders remain closed. According to the U.S. Embassy in Senegal, Americans are welcome to visit and must follow entry protocols. The embassy notes, however, that it has received reports from some Americans who report difficulty booking travel to Senegal because of current restrictions.

Senegal requires the original certificate of a negative COVID-19 test taken with five days (120 hours) of arrival. The West African country also requires all arrivals to submit a Public Health Passenger Locator form. Arriving passengers face health screenings.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Senegal is Level 3: Reconsider Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Senegal.

Serbia

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 48 hours before arrival
• PCR or Antigen (only for travel originating in the U.S.) test required

Other restrictions: Face mask requirements and social distancing measures are in place.

What’s open: Most hotels and businesses, but cafes and restaurants are open for outdoor dining, take-out or delivery only.

Serbia isn’t part of the European Union, and according to the U.S. Embassy in Serbia, Americans can enter the country. To do so, they need to provide a negative PCR test taken within the previous 48 hours. If a U.S. citizen’s travel originates in the U.S., they can provide either a negative PCR or Antigen test. The embassy reports that the Antigen test allowance includes passengers who transit another airport on their way from the U.S. to Serbia, but not those whose travel originated outside the U.S.

COVID-19 cases rose sharply in Serbia and throughout the Balkans in early March 2021 and the government announced that tighter measures may need to be introduced. On March 22, 2021, all cafes, restaurants, bars, nightclubs and shopping malls were ordered to close (except for takeout and delivery and, more recently, outdoor dining). Cultural institutions and public transportation are open, but at limited capacity. Face mask and social distancing measures remain in place and certain businesses must close early.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Serbia is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Serbia.

Seychelles

A photo of Air Seychelles’ first Airbus A320neo. (Photo courtesy of Airbus)
Air Seychelles’ first Airbus A320neo. (Photo courtesy of Airbus)

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Only fully vaccinated U.S. travelers were allowed until March 25, 2021, when arrivals opened to all U.S. travelers; all travelers (even those who are vaccinated) must provide PCR test results; all visitors also must obtain a Travel Health Authorization, have valid travel health insurance and stay at certified accommodations; face masks and social distancing are required.

What’s open: Most businesses and hotels, but tourists must stay only in certified properties and avoid prolonged interaction with the local community; there is a 10 p.m. curfew.

The Seychelles, which has gone to extremes to protect itself from coronavirus (in May 2020, TPG cruise reporter Gene Sloan wrote about the small island nation off the coast of Africa banning cruise ships until 2022), is now welcoming vaccinated Americans, and as of March 25, 2021, even non-vaccinated U.S. travelers can visit. Details can be found here. However, COVID-19 cases have been rising throughout April and early May 2021, setting new weekly and monthly records.

In February 2021, the country announced that fully vaccinated U.S. travelers can visit, but as of March 25, 2021, both vaccinated and unvaccinated visitors can enter the country. They must obtain a Travel Health Authorization via the online portal, upload a negative result of a COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of their flight, submit their flight and hotel details and have valid travel health insurance that covers, at a minimum, COVID-19 related isolation, quarantine and clinical care. Note: Visitors may only stay at licensed establishments or liveaboards that have been certified by the Public Health Authority.

Related: Seychelles reopening: Fire up the private jet

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Seychelles, as shown on the U.S. Embassy in Mauritius and the Seychelles website, is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Seychelles

South Africa

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Health screening upon arrival; without the proper test, travelers must quarantine for 10 days; face masks and social distancing are required in public spaces.

What’s open: Most businesses (with limited hours and capacity restrictions); many hotels, safari lodges and game reserves and national parks are open; public transportation is running at reduced capacity.

South Africa re-opened to tourism on Oct. 1, 2020, and, according to the U.S. Embassy in South Africa, as of Nov. 11, 2020, U.S. citizens can enter the country for tourism purposes, but they need to present a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours from the time of departure, or they must remain in mandatory quarantine for 10 days at their own cost. Details can be found here.

In December 2020, both South Africa and the United Kingdom began reporting troubling new COVID-19 variants, which resulted in the widespread suspension of flights and travel to and from both the U.K. and South Africa. The U.S. government on Jan. 26, 2021 then banned travel from South Africa, with the exceptions of U.S. citizens and legal U.S. residents (travel from the U.K. and Brazil, where another COVID-19 variant has emerged, had already been banned).

South Africa suffered a dangerous second wave in December 2020 and January 2021, surpassing 1.5 million total cases and forcing a return to a Level 3 lockdown alert with restrictions that were eased back to Level 1 on March 1, 2021 as cases declined. Still, many questions remain about the COVID-19 variant first detected in South Africa, including its potential resistance to current vaccines.

All arriving travelers will face a health screening. If a passenger has a negative test result, they will not have to quarantine. Those who don’t present test results will need to quarantine for 10 days at their own expense. Travelers must also download the South Africa coronavirus mobile tracing app, and fill in all the information on that app.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for South Africa is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in South Africa.

South Korea

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Mandatory 14-day quarantine regardless of vaccination status and passengers must sign a release agreeing to quarantine before boarding their flight; visitors cannot board connecting flights within South Korea until after completing the mandatory quarantine.

What’s open: Most hotels and businesses, subject to local regulations in response to outbreaks; public transportation is running and masks are mandated.

Americans can go to South Korea, but a mandatory two-week quarantine will make it undesirable for most travelers.

While the country is technically open to foreigners on short-term visits, most (with limited exceptions) are subject to a mandatory quarantine at a government-designated facility at their own expense for 14 days. The U.S. Embassy in South Korea notes that this will cost approximately $100-$150 USD per night, and passengers will be required to sign a release form agreeing to these conditions before departing. As of Jan. 8, 2021 all travelers are also required to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of departure; airlines will not permit passengers to board without the proper test results in their original form (English is acceptable). Additional details can be found here.

RELATED: I quarantined and tested abroad in South Korea — here’s what it was like

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for South Korea is Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in South Korea.

Sri Lanka

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Visitors must remain in a “travel bubble” within designated tourism zones; testing upon arrival and on day 7 is also required.

What’s open: Select hotels, resorts and tourist sites; tourists are not allowed to mix with the local population.

Sri Lanka, which had been closed to tourists since March 2020, has reopened its two international airports — Bandaranaike International Airport (CMB) and Mattala International Airport (HRI) — and is beginning to allow tourism to resume. The re-opening began in December 2020 with a pilot program with Ukraine, in which tourists are allowed to visit in a “travel bubble.” After a review, the country extended the re-opening to other countries, beginning Jan. 21, 2021. However, flights to Sri Lanka remain extremely limited and a rise in cases in late April and early May 2021 has resulted in preventative measures, including curfews and some travel restrictions, to be enacted.

The U.S. Embassy in Sri Lanka now says that travel by Americans to Sri Lanka is allowed but on a very limited basis. A valid visa is required (visa upon arrival remains suspended) travelers also need to be tested (COVID-19 PCR test) in the U.S. within 72 hours of their flight and then again when they check-in at their hotel and a third time seven days later. They will also need to remain within a “travel bubble” in 14 designated tourism zones—about 180 hotels are participating—and not mix with the local population.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Sri Lanka is Level 3: Reconsider Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Sri Lanka.

Tajikistan

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: A Tajik visa is required for entry; travelers must fill out a Health Surveillance Form and undergo another PCR test upon arrival; a positive result may require transfer to a government facility for quarantine.

What’s open: Most businesses, hotels and restaurants; public transportation is running and masks are required.

Tajikistan never did have a full lockdown, and most businesses, hotels and restaurants reopened on June 15, 2020. According to the U.S. Embassy in Tajikistan, all Americans need a Tajik visa for entry and must show results of a negative COVID-19 PCR test issued within 72 hours of arrival when boarding flights to Dushanbe; they are also subject to PCR testing at the airport upon arrival. Travelers must provide contact information and will be allowed to leave the airport, but if the result is positive for COVID-19, travelers may be transferred to a government quarantine facility.

The U.S. Embassy also notes that access to medical care in the country may be limited and that “the Government of Tajikistan frequently adjusts its entry and exit requirements in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and changes to policy are not immediately made available to the public.” A non-expired visa is also required to leave Tajikistan.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department has a Level 4: Do Not Travel advisory in effect for Tajikistan related to both COVID-19 and the potential for terrorism.

Tanzania 

The Ngorongoro Crater in Tanzania. (Photo by Freder / Getty Images)

COVID-19 test required: Yes, as of May 3, 2021

• 72 hours before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: U.S. travelers need a tourist visa and must complete and online Health Surveillance Form within 24 hours of arrival; arriving passengers face enhanced screening and those from countries with new COVID-19 variants will be subjected to a rapid test, followed by a 14-day quarantine.

What’s open: Most businesses, hotels, safari lodges and camps and national parks; public transportation is running.

Tanzania, which had been accepting tourists with no testing or quarantine conditions attached, now requires all travelers to present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival and to complete an online Health Surveillance Form within 24 hours prior to arrival. Travelers will undergo screening upon arrival and those arriving from countries with a high number of COVID-19 cases (or those who have been in those countries within the past 14 days) will also be required to take a rapid test ($25) upon arrival in Tanzania, followed by a 14-day quarantine at their own cost.

The new requirements were put into effect by the country’s new president Samia Saluhu Hassan to try to curb the spread of new variants.

Tanzania’s late president John Magufuli had until a few weeks before his death denied widespread COVID-19 transmission (the government had not been reporting cases). Magufuli, 61, died on March 18, 2021 after not being seen in public for more than two weeks.

The U.S. Embassy in Tanzania is reporting that it has seen an increase in the number of cases reported to it since January 2021 and that the use of masks, social distancing and other prevention strategies are largely absent throughout the country. The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Tanzania is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

U.S. tourists also need a visa to visit Tanzania. See details here.

Related: Country-by-country guide to Africa reopening

Tanzania has received much criticism on how it has handled the coronavirus pandemic. The government hasn’t actively revealed data about infection rates or death. President Magufuli had said that releasing the data was “causing panic” and at the start of the pandemic declined to close churches, saying that the virus “cannot survive in the body of Christ — it will burn.” He also claimed Tanzania was free of coronavirus as of June 2020 due to prayer and the work of front-line workers. He even celebrated citizens who weren’t wearing masks as a sign that people were no longer afraid and the virus was gone.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

Related: Dreaming of Tanzania

Thailand

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Travelers need a Certificate of Entry and valid medical insurance; they need to test upon arrival and undergo aa 14-day quarantine in specific hotels with confirmation of a booked stay before travel and testing during quarantine.

What’s open: Many hotels and businesses, but it varies by region based on control measures following a recent surge in cases.

Thailand had remained closed to most foreign tourists, but in late 2020 began offering 60-day long-stay visas to residents of low-risk and medium-risk countries, including the United States. As of April 1, 2021, U.S. passport holders are no longer required to obtain a visa for a tourist visit of up to 45 days (valid through September 30, 2021). They still need to obtain a Certificate of Entry. Details are here.

Travelers also still need to book a reservation at one of Thailand’s Alternative State Quarantine hotels. As of May 6, 2021, all U.S. passport holders must again quarantine in-room for 14 days (it had briefly been lowered to 10 days for unvaccinated travelers and 7 days for fully vaccinated travelers) due to rising cases in the country throughout April 2021. The most recent updates on travel to Thailand can be found here.

To enter Thailand, U.S. travelers need a Certificate of Entry (COE) issued by the Royal Thai Embassy or Consulate; a COVID-19 health insurance policy with a minimum coverage of US$100,000; confirmation of Alternative State Quarantine (ASQ) hotel booking, and a medical certificate with a negative COVID-19 PCR laboratory result issued no more than 72 hours before departure.

During quarantine in Thailand, travelers must remain in their rooms and undergo a PCR test on the day of arrival and on days 6-7 and days 12-13.

For further information on visiting Thailand, check the U.S. Embassy in Thailand’s website.

Related: Thailand will fully reopen to vaccinated travelers in a phased approach

Thailand had announced that it plans to waive quarantine requirements for travelers who have been vaccinated, beginning with travel to Phuket on July 1, 2021, although in late April the island was dealing with a surge of infections. Thailand also recently began promoting six resorts offering a “golf quarantine.”

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s travel advisory for Thailand is Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Thailand.

Tunisia

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Pre-travel online health questionnaire; unvaccinated travelers must undergo a mandatory 7-day quarantine at a government-selected hotel (at their own cost), followed by a second PCR test taken between days 5 and 7; masks are required in all public spaces.

What’s open: Most hotels, restaurants and businesses; there is a 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew and weekly markets are closed.

Tunisia is open to U.S. tourists, and according to the U.S. Embassy in Tunisia, visitors to this North African country must present the negative result of a COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival. All travelers must complete a pre-travel online health questionnaire (which they should print and sign and be prepared to show it upon flight check-in and/or to immigration authorities in Tunisia), download and use the Tunisian government’s “track and trace” app on their mobile phones, and undergo a health screening upon arrival. Some travelers will be selected for a rapid COVID-19 test.

Vaccinated travelers must have documented proof to avoid a new quarantine requirement. All unvaccinated visitors to Tunisia are required to self-quarantine for seven days at a government-selected hotel (at their own cost with proof of reservation upon arrival) and pay for a second PCR test, taken between days 5 and 7. The U.S. Embassy recommends contacting the Tunisian Embassy in Washington, DC for details.

Face masks and adherence to COVID-19 restrictions are required and those who don’t obey local requirements can face stiff fines of 1,000 TND to 5,000 TND (approximately $366 to $1,800).

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Tunisia is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Tunisia.

Turkey

Istanbul, Turkey (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Istanbul, Turkey (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Arriving travelers must complete a passenger information form and undergo a medical screening; symptomatic passengers will be required to undergo testing and quarantine and treatment if positive.

What’s open: Most hotels and businesses, with varying restrictions and operating hours, but restaurants are open for delivery only since on April 29, 2021, Turkey entered a three-week lockdown that will restrict movement and intercity travel through at least May 17, 2021 (although tourists are exempt).

Turkey is welcoming tourists from a number of countries, including the U.S., according to the U.S. Embassy in Turkey.  Country-specific restrictions are available here. Turkey also entered a 21-day lockdown that limits services and restricts intercity travel (but not for tourists, according to the U.S. Embassy).

Related: Turkey is open to Americans

Since Dec. 30 2020, all international travelers six years of age and older are required to have a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 72 hours of travel and submit it at airline check-in. Travelers without the required test results will not be allowed to board flights or enter the country. And since March 15, 2021, all travelers six years of age and older must also must complete a Turkey Entrance Form within 72 hours of their flight (a print out or mobile screen shot of the completed form must be presented before boarding).

Upon arrival, travelers will be asked to fill out another passenger information form and undergo medical screenings for infection, and anyone showing symptoms upon arrival will be tested for coronavirus. Anyone who tests positive will be referred to a Turkish hospital or to a dormitory for quarantine.

Restrictions put into place in September 2020 mandate the wearing of face masks at all times when in public and travelers should note a couple of precautions unrelated to COVID-19:

  • The U.S. State Department’s travel advisory guide lists Turkey at Level 4: Do Not Travel, due to concerns over COVID-19, terrorism and arbitrary detention. Travelers are strongly advised to avoid the areas bordering Iraq and Syria due to terrorist activity.
  • U.S. travelers will still need to apply for a visa before entering Turkey. You can do so via e-visa application, which takes about three minutes.
  • The State Department’s travelers’ checklist here.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Turkey.

Turks and Caicos

Beach in Providenciales, Turks and Caicos. Image courtesy of Shutterstock.
Beach in Providenciales, Turks and Caicos. (Courtesy of Shutterstock)

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 5 days before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Travel pre-authorization is required; masks are mandated in public spaces through at least June 30, 2021.

What’s open: Most resorts and beaches are open; restaurants are open at 30% capacity.

Turks and Caicos, a group of 40 low-lying coral islands popular with tourists in the Caribbean, reopened for international visitors, including U.S. travelers, on July 22, 2020. The Providenciales Airport reopened that day.

This British Overseas Territory includes the island of Providenciales, also known as Provo.

More: What you have to know for Turks and Caicos reopening

Travelers age 10 and older to Turks and Caicos are required to take a COVID-19 PCR test within five days of visiting the islands and obtain travel pre-authorization via the TCI Assured Portal. Masks are also required in public places and the government recently re-imposed an 11 p.m. curfew through at June 30, 2021.

For the latest information on requirements, visit the Turks & Caicos Tourism website.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here. Many resorts in the Caribbean have begun offering on-property rapid Antigen and PCR tests to guests prior to departure for the U.S., so check your resort’s policy before traveling.

Related coverage: Why I love Turks and Caicos

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Turks and Caicos is Level 4: Do Not Travel. Visit the U.S. Embassy in the Bahamas, which oversees Turks and Caicos, for additional information.

Uganda

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 120 hours before departure (and 120 hours before departure from Uganda, but United States’ requirements call for testing within 72 hours for those traveling back to the U.S.)
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Health screening and temperature check upon arrival

What’s open: Many businesses and restaurants; casinos with restricted hours; and all national parks.

Americans can currently travel to Uganda, known as one of the top destinations for gorilla trekking. The country’s national parks reopened to tourists in October 2020.

According to the U.S. Embassy in Uganda, arriving passengers must have a negative PCR COVID-19 test from an accredited laboratory in the country of origin taken not more than 120 hours before departure for Uganda. Passengers will be subjected to temperature and health screening upon arrival at Entebbe Airport, but are not required to quarantine. However, any arriving passengers who exhibit signs or symptoms of infectious disease will be transported to an isolation center for a COVID-19 test where they must remain, at their own cost, until the results of the test are received. Travelers who test positive will be taken to a Ministry of Health facility for treatment, at their own cost.

The U.S. Embassy also notes that the Government of Uganda also now requires that all departing passengers present a negative PCR COVID-19 test taken not more than 120 hours before departure. This requirement is mandatory for all departing passengers out of Uganda even if the destination country does not require it. But the U.S. now does: As of Jan. 26, everyone aged two and older traveling to the U.S. from Uganda must show a negative viral COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of departure before being allowed to board their flights.

Uganda had eased some of its lockdown restrictions, allowing some businesses like hardware shops, restaurants and wholesale stores to reopen. There is a nightly 9 p.m. curfew and masks are required in public.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Uganda is Level 3: Reconsider Travel due to COVID-19 and the risk of kidnapping.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Uganda.

Ukraine

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Health screening upon arrival; proof of medical insurance valid in Ukraine is also required.

What’s open: Ukraine is under adaptive quarantine until at least June 30, 2021, with different restrictions by region; mask-wearing is mandatory on public transportation (which is limited to essential workers only in Kyiv) and in indoor public spaces.

Americans are currently able to enter the country, according to the U.S. Embassy in Ukraine’s website, although the Ministry of Health “considers the United States a country with a high incidence of COVID-19.”  Ukraine itself has seen a resurgence of the virus in recent weeks and remains under adaptive quarantine.

All U.S. citizens entering Ukraine from the U.S., must present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival (children under 12 are now exempt) and must also demonstrate that they have medical insurance covering all expenses related to COVID-19 treatment while in Ukraine.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Ukraine is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Ukraine.

United Arab Emirates

Abu Dhabi, U.A.E. May 2017. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
Abu Dhabi, U.A.E. May 2017. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours (for Dubai) and 96 hours (for Abu Dhabi) before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: In Abu Dhabi, an additional test upon arrival and a 10-day self-isolation with a third test on day 4 or day 8 depending on the length of stay; in Dubai, travelers may be requested to take another test at the airport upon arrival; face masks and social distancing are required in public spaces.

What’s open: Most hotels, restaurants, malls and beaches are open at reduced capacity.

The United Arab Emirates is open to tourism and Americans are welcome. However, a recent spike in cases of both the U.K. and South African variants linked to travel resulted in Dubai closing all bars and pubs and limiting certain activities through mid-April 2021.

Dubai reopened to tourists on July 7, 2020, and tourist visas (required for U.S. travelers) are being issued in all emirates, including Abu Dhabi, which began welcoming back international travelers on Dec. 24, 2020, with testing and quarantine protocols in place.

To enter Abu Dhabi, tourists over the age of 12 will be required to present a COVID-19 PCR test negative certificate done within 96 hours of departure and undergo a second test upon arrival, with results delivered in 90 minutes. If the traveler is from from “green list” country (the U.S. is not on the list) and receives two negative tests, they are not required to quarantine. All other travelers, even if they test negative, are required to self-isolate for 10 days. And all travelers will be required to take a third COVID-19 PCR test on day 4 if staying four days or more and a fourth on day 8 if staying eight days or more. Details are available here.

Tourists over the age of 12 traveling to Dubai are also required to have a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of departure (recently changed from 96 hours) and some travelers, depending on their country of origin, will be tested again upon arrival. All travelers must also download the COVID-19 DXB app and register their details. However, visitors entering Dubai are not required to quarantine. For additional information on traveling to Dubai, check the Emirates airline website.

All test results for both emirates must be presented either in English or Arabic in original, physical form. Digital copies will not be accepted. Travelers with severe and moderate disabilities may be exempted from the test requirement.

All arrivals will also be subject to thermal screenings. If a traveler is suspected to have COVID-19 symptoms, Dubai airports have the right to re-test to ensure the tourist is free of the virus.

Tourists must comply with preventive measures and safety procedures and must self-isolate for 14 days if they test positive. The National Emergency Crisis and Disasters Management Authority of the UAE (NCEMA), as well as the official website of the UAE, has stated that anyone entering the UAE from another country who receives a positive test result upon arrival must undergo a self-quarantine of 14 days. Violating home quarantine is punishable with fines of AED 50,000 ($13,600).

Related: Dubai and Abu Dhabi are open

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for the UAE is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in the UAE.

United Kingdom 

London Heathrow (LHR). (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)
London Heathrow (LHR). (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: All arriving travelers must fill out a passenger locator form and quarantine for 10 days (plus book a testing package in most cases), with different quarantine testing requirements for England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland; face masks are required in all public spaces.

What’s open: England, Scotland and Wales are emerging from lockdown; outdoor dining at restaurants has been allowed since April 12, 2021 in England; Scotland is also lifting some restrictions.

Americans can travel to the United Kingdom, but are strongly advised not to and will face strict testing requirements and a 10-day quarantine and in most cases two tests on days 2 and 8 (in England only, quarantine can be reduced after one negative COVID-19 PCR test taken on day 5 under its Test to Release scheme). The U.K. also now requires all arriving travelers to fill out a passenger locator form within 48 hours of travel and to present proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of departure for the U.K.

On Feb. 8, 2021, the U.K. also increased the fine for non-compliance and anyone who fails to comply will be subject to a fine of 1,000 pounds ($1,360). The government also revealed stiff fines and even jail time for those who try to circumvent the mandates or lie on their required passenger locator forms; the latter could be a 10,000 pound ($13,789) fine or 10 years in jail. Details are here.

COVID-19 infections and deaths have begun to level off after hitting record highs in January 2021. Some lockdown measures are gradually being eased in England, Scotland and Wales with some shops reopening; restaurants and pubs reopened April 12, 2021 for outdoor dining in England; Scotland has also begun to lift its lockdown restrictions.

All four nations that comprise the U.K. have separate testing and quarantine requirement: England’s are here, Scotland’s are here, Northern Ireland’s are here and Wales’s are here.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his team announced on April 5, 2021 that the country will introduce a “traffic light” system for international travel beginning as early as May 17, 2021. Passengers coming from so-called “green” countries will not need to quarantine on their arrival.

Related: Will Americans be able to vacation in the U.K. this summer?

The U.K. has been especially hard-hit by the coronavirus and the new restrictions are a result of the chaos that erupted in December when a more infectious COVID-19 variant was found to be widely circulating in London and southeastern England.

The U.S. State Department’s current advisory is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Visit the U.S. Embassy in the United Kingdom‘s website for regular updates.

The quarantine rules do not apply to international passengers transiting U.K. airports.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in the United Kingdom.

U.S. Virgin Islands

panoramic view of Carambola Beach, St.Croix, US Virgin Islands. (Photo by cdwheatley/Getty Images)
Panoramic view of Carambola Beach, St.Croix, US Virgin Islands. (Photo by cdwheatley/Getty Images)

COVID-19 test required:

• 5 days before departure
• PCR or rapid Antigen test required (or positive antibody test result within four months of travel)

Other restrictions: Masks are mandatory when going into businesses and attractions and when using public transportation.

What’s open: Resorts, hotels, villas and Airbnb accommodations are open; beaches are open, subject to social distancing; capacity guidelines are in place for restaurants, retail businesses and attractions, taxi vans, safari vehicles and limo services.

The U.S. Virgin Islands, which includes St. Thomas, St. John and St. Croix, was under a state of emergency until July 11, 2020, but began welcoming back tourists on June 1, 2020, with restrictions. After a surge in cases, the islands returned to a “stay at home” order on Aug. 13, 2020, but again reopened to tourism on Sept.19, 2020.

Every traveler five years of age or older (even those who have completed their COVID-19 vaccinations) is currently required to submit to the U.S. Virgin Islands Travel Screening Portal a negative COVID-19 test result (molecular, PCR or rapid Antigen) obtained within five days of commencement of travel to the Territory or a positive COVID-19 antibody test taken and received within four months of travel date. Visitors must produce the original test result and the travel certification from the portal upon arrival. As of Jan. 25, 2021, travelers age five and older are not allowed to board flights to the U.S. Virgin Islands without travel certification from the portal. Details can be found here.

No quarantine is required for healthy visitors who have negative test results.

Travelers who are asked to quarantine will be expected to do so at their own expense, and according to the government, “are responsible for all associated costs, including transportation, lodging, food, and medical care.”

Related: U.S. Virgin Islands reopening

A note for travelers returning from the U.S. Virgin Islands: The U.S. now requires proof of a negative COVID-19 viral test for all international arrivals by air, but passengers traveling back to the U.S. mainland from the U.S. Virgin Islands will not be required to have taken a test.

Uzbekistan

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 72 hours before departure
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: U.S. travelers need a visa for entry; health screening and rapid Antigen test upon arrival; face masks are required in all public spaces.

What’s open: Most hotels, restaurants and businesses are open; public transportation is operating.

Uzbekistan is open to Americans. In fact, it promises to compensate tourists up to $3,000 if they catch COVID-19.

U.S. citizens need a visa for entry, according to the U.S. Embassy in Uzbekistan, and a negative COVID-19 PCR test is required within 72 hours of departure to the country. Tourists face health screenings on arrival, as well as a rapid Antigen test (at a cost of approximately $9). Passengers must wait for results and if they test positive, they will be taken to a health facility for treatment and quarantine; they will not be able to go to a hotel, as hotels will not take COVID-19 positive travelers. After two weeks and a negative test, they will be released from quarantine.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State department’s advisory for Uzbekistan is Level 4: Do Not Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on COVID-19 cases in Uzbekistan.

Zambia

COVID-19 test required: Yes

•  72 hours before arrival
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Health screening and temperature check upon arrival

What’s open: Most businesses, hotels, safari lodges and camps, restaurants, national parks and tourist sites; public transportation is operating.

Zambia, home to Victoria Falls and known as a top safari destination, is open to international travelers, including Americans. However, according to the U.S. Embassy in Zambia, a second wave of cases is winding down in the coutry and it strongly recommends reconsidering travel to Zambia. The CDC has issued a Level 3: High Level of COVID-19 warning for the country.

Zambia now requires a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival (changed from 7 days). Tourists also need a visa (apply online for an e-visa here). There are no quarantine requirements right now, but there are reports of some health screenings and symptomatic individuals may be required to submit to testing and/or quarantine.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Zambia is Level 3: Reconsider Travel.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Zambia.

Zimbabwe

COVID-19 test required: Yes

• 48 hours before arrival (test issued within that time)
• PCR test required

Other restrictions: Quarantine in a government holding facility for anyone arriving without the required test, until receiving a negative test result; masks and social distancing are required in public spaces.

What’s open: Mostly essential businesses; restaurants are take-out and delivery only unless serving hotel guests; bars are closed; public transportation is running on a limited basis.

U.S. citizens can travel to Zimbabwe, according to the U.S. Embassy, and must present a negative COVID-19 PCR test issued within 48 hours of arrival. However, as cases surged in January 2021, a nationwide lockdown with a curfew (now 10:30 p.m. to 5 a.m.) was put into place and extended with slightly relaxed restrictions on March 1, 2021. Cases have greatly declined, but amid the January surge, four officials in the Zimbabwe government died of COVID-19.

Zimbabwe reopened its borders to international flights on Oct. 1. 2020.

Travelers who arrive in Zimbabwe without the required test must get tested upon arrival and quarantine in a government holding facility until getting a negative result.

For details on new PCR or rapid Antigen testing requirements (as of Jan. 26, 2021) for all international air travelers returning to the U.S., check here.

The U.S. State Department’s advisory for Zimbabwe is Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution.

Check the Johns Hopkins University website for updates on cases in Zimbabwe.

Important caveats and things to know

COVID-19 continues to spread around the world. While some countries have done a good job of containing the virus, there is still much we don’t know. Travel is still considered a risky undertaking. Know the rules and regulations for the place you are planning to visit and make sure you have completed all the necessary steps (like pre-departure testing in most cases). There is also the possibility countries could change their minds on reopening at the last minute (like we saw in Portugal and Iceland, which has since opened up to vaccinated Americans) so make sure you are booking refundable tickets and hotels or purchasing travel insurance.

What about Europe?

Most of the EU is still closed to Americans, but change may be on the horizon, as leadership of the European Union recently indicated that vaccinated Americans will be welcome within the EU by summer. Currently, Croatia and Greece have reopened to Americans and Americans can go to the U.K., but a 10-day required quarantine and restrictions on internal travel make the prospect less than ideal. The lifting of some U.K. restrictions, however, could just be weeks away.

Related: Want to travel to Europe this summer? Here’s what you need to know.

Additional reporting by Katherine Fan, Ariana Arghandewal, Jordyn Fields, Donna Heiderstadt, Zach Honig, Brian Kelly, Brian Kim, Samantha Rosen, Victoria Walker, and Zach Wichter.

Featured image from Aruba in December of 2017 by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy.

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Excellent/Good

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