3 Tips From Traveling Mom Sarah Michelle Gellar

Oct 26, 2017

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Sarah Michelle Gellar — best known for her career as a TV and film actress (hello Buffy fans!) — travels all the time. And she’s got three major projects: She recently launched a baking kit company called Foodstirs, she’s the author of a cookbook called Stirring Up Fun with Food and she’s the mother of two young kids. Of note to TPG readers; she also began representing the new Capital One Savor Cash Rewards Credit Card — which is how I came to chat with her for TPG. The information for the Capital One Savor Cash Rewards Credit Card has been collected independently by The Points Guy. The card details on this page have not been reviewed or provided by the card issuer.

While it’d be a stretch to call Gellar an expert on credit cards and loyalty programs, she definitely knows a thing or two about traveling with young kids — her daughter Charlotte is eight and her son Rocky is five, and both have been flying since a very young age.

I managed to grab a few minutes of Gellar’s time at the Savor card launch event, and she passed along three tips for traveling with small children. As it turns out, she had several gems to share.

1. Keep Them Engaged in the Travel Process

Sarah Michelle Gellar with her son Rocky James Prinze. Photo by Mike Windle / Staff via Getty Images.
Sarah Michelle Gellar with her son Rocky James Prinze. Photo by Mike Windle / Staff via Getty Images.

“I traveled with my kids from a young age, and it’s about keeping them engaged and part of the process,” Gellar said. “Talking about where you’re going, what you’re doing, how does a plane fly, who works on the plane. If you make them interested in all the aspects, then they feel a sense of security and control, and they’re interested in what’s going on around them. I remember one of my daughter’s first flights when she was old enough to really understand. She wanted to help hand out the napkins, and the flight attendant was like ‘great!’ She went aisle to aisle and 40 minutes of that flight was gone; people were really excited.”

2. How You Present Yourself Is Key

Sarah Michelle Gellar prepares a pie with her daughter Charlotte. Photo by Bernstein Associates / Contributor via Getty Images.
Sarah Michelle Gellar prepares a pie with her daughter Charlotte. Photo by Bernstein Associates / Contributor via Getty Images.

If you tend to get frustrated when faced with long security lines or struggle to hide your anxiety before takeoff, it could help to refine your own approach before your first big trip with the kids. As Gellar said, “Don’t show fear. That’s Number 1. Kids and dogs, if they smell fear, you’re done.”

3. Don’t Be Afraid to Pull out an iPad

Even if you tend to limit tablet time at home, you might want to reconsider that practice for your time in the air.

“I think that an airplane is a perfect example of a great use of technology, but I think it’s more than just movies, it’s about games you can play,” Gellar explained. “I was guilty in the beginning of bringing board games on airplanes, and that was a mistake, since the cards fly everywhere and all that. So [think about] what are learning experiences and tools that you can do on an airplane, so you’re not just having them watch a movie but you’re actually connecting with them and doing something engaging.”

For more on traveling with your kids, see:

Do you have any tips of your own? Please share them in the comments below.

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