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If you’ve ever seen an episode of Taxicab Confessions, you’d probably believe that what’s said and done in the backseat of a cab will stay there. But Uber is not a cab service. It’s a ride-sharing service that, according to the company, lives by the golden rule of “Treat people as you would like to be treated yourself” — and this goes for both riders and drivers.

In order to clarify its position on what is and is not Uber-appropriate behavior, the company updated its Community Guidelines last week as a way to “explain in plain English the kind of behavior we expect from both riders and drivers when using Uber,” the company wrote on its blog. As for those who violate the rules? Don’t be surprised if you end up on the “banned riders” list.

So just what constitutes bad behavior in the eyes of Uber’s powers-that-be? A lot of the no-nos are the kinds of things you might expect, including breaking any sort of law while using the service — such as carrying drugs or open containers of alcohol into the vehicle, since this isn’t a party bus people — using an Uber vehicle to commit a crime, encouraging your driver to exceed the speed limit or traveling with more people than there are seat belts. Damaging property that does not belong to you is also a ban-worthy offense — and yes, this does including “vomiting due to excessive alcohol consumption.”

Inappropriate language and behavior will not be tolerated either — during or after the ride. Frisky types should be aware that the company’s “physical contact” rule strictly forbids any touching or flirting with anyone else in the car, be it the driver or your significant other. Asking overly personal questions is also frowned upon. “As a reminder, Uber has a no sex rule,” the company warns. “That’s no sexual conduct with drivers or fellow riders, no matter what.”

Even if you think you met your soulmate on the ride home last night, you’d better make sure that feeling is reciprocated, as unwanted contact with a fellow passenger or your driver after the trip is also strictly prohibited. This includes “texting, calling or visiting someone in person after a ride has been completed.” Consider yourself warned!

Featured image courtesy of Uber’s Facebook page.

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