Singapore’s Changi Airport Sees Dramatic Increase in Confiscated Items

Nov 9, 2016

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It’s probably no huge surprise that the TSA agents here at home find some pretty unusual items that travelers try to sneak past security checkpoints. There’s been brass knuckles, flaming balls, cane swords and more. But, what is surprising is that one of the best airports in the world, located in one of the safest countries in world has seen a dramatic increase in the number of confiscated goods — Singapore’s Changi Airport (SIN).

Between January and September of this year, SIN security has confiscated more than one million items — a number that’s 9x higher than the number of items confiscated last year. Passengers handed over 142,000 items like scissors and hoverboards, as well as about 1.2 million liquids, gels, perfumes and makeup.

In order to combat the increase in confiscations, SIN has teamed with the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) to pass out brochures to tourists at more than 20 hotels in Singapore before they go to the airport for their departing flights. But, that oftentimes isn’t enough, and additional research is needed. If you’re flying through Singapore’s Changi Airport in the near future, be sure to check ahead to make sure any of your belongings aren’t forbidden by SIN’s guidelines. Especially check for the two biggest culprits — scooters and hoverboards.

H/T: View From the Wing

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