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The 5 Craziest Things Passengers Tried to Sneak By the TSA in October

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Every week, the TSA blogs about items (mostly weapons) that agents have confiscated at airports around the country, and the agency posts some of the crazier items on its Instagram page. Below are five things that we at Team TPG think are the most ridiculous items that were confiscated this month — once again, we’re grateful that the TSA remains diligent in preventing passengers from boarding aircraft with such dangerous weapons.

1. Brass Knuckles

While they can certainly give you some major street cred, brass knuckles, recently found in one passenger’s carry-on bag at Syracuse Hancock International Airport (SYR), aren’t going to get you very far if you try to bring them on board an aircraft. While you can’t carry them with you, brass knuckles are technically allowed to fly in your checked luggage as long as they’re legal in the places you’re traveling to.

Check laws regarding brass knuckles in the areas you're traveling through — they may be illegal.
Check laws regarding brass knuckles in the areas you’re traveling through, as they may be illegal.

2. Ornate Knife

TSA agents at Chicago O’Hare International Airport (ORD) discovered this deep-red knife in someone’s carry-on bag. While it’s one of the better looking knives we’ve seen, it’s still prohibited from traveling with you on the plane. As a reminder, knives can fly if they’re securely stowed in your checked luggage.

No matter how great they look, knives have to be packed in your checked luggage.
No matter how great they look, knives have to be packed in your checked luggage, not in your carry-on.

3. Knife Pen

This knife/pen combo looks like it would be at home in a James Bond movie, but since it’s a concealed weapon, carrying it on could lead to steep fines and even arrest. To avoid any complications while traveling with concealed knives, pack them safely in a checked bag.

This knife/pen was found by TSA agents at Kansas City International Airport (MCI).
This knife/pen was recently discovered by TSA agents at Kansas City International Airport (MCI).

4. Belt Knife

While this belt/knife combo scores a lot of points for utility, it’s not a great idea to try to get it through the TSA checkpoint — just like the knife pen above, this is a concealed weapon, meaning you could be subject to fines and even arrest. Make sure it’s safely stowed in your checked luggage if you want to bring a belt knife along on your next trip.

This clever belt knife was discovered by TSA agents at Detroit Metro International Airport (DTW).
This clever belt knife was discovered by TSA agents at Detroit Metro International Airport (DTW).

5. Replica Suicide Vest

One passenger at Richmond International Airport (RIC) thought it would be OK to bring along a replica suicide vest with him on a trip. While the passenger claimed it was simply a prop, TSA explosives experts and airport police were called in to deal with the situation. Ultimately, the explosives experts found that the vest posed no danger.

Remember that explosives or items resembling explosives can't fly.
Remember that explosives — or items resembling them — can’t fly with you.

What’s the strangest item you’ve seen at a TSA checkpoint?

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