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Marriott CEO Arne Sorenson Goes Zero-G in Brooklyn

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It’s been a pretty crazy week for Arne Sorenson, but Marriott’s CEO managed to find time to swing by Brooklyn following a chat at this week’s Skift conference, where TPG spoke yesterday. The occasion? A chance to experience the chain’s “Gravity Room,” currently on display at the New York Marriott at the Brooklyn Bridge.

The space is designed as a replica of a modern Marriott guest room, but with all of the furniture installed 90 degrees to the side. There are quite a few of these sideways shots floating around on the web, but don’t let that dissuade you. There’s still time to snap your own Gravity Room pics — the exhibit is scheduled to remain open through October 6.

Featured image courtesy of Marriott.

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