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Update: Some offers mentioned below are no longer available. View the current offers here – Citi Hilton HHonors Reserve Card

The Citi Hilton Reserve card is one of the most lucrative hotel cards out there. The two free weekend night signup bonus (after spending $2,500 within 4 months of account opening) can be super valuable. I used mine at the $1,000+ a night Conrad Maldives, but you can use them at pretty much any Hilton resort that has standard award room availability. In addition to this, Citi is now offering $100 in statement when you spend $100 or more on a Hilton stay within the first 3 months of account opening. You earn 10 Hilton points per dollar spent on Hilton stays and in addition, Hilton is offering double points or airline miles from May 1- July 31, so a summer stay could be pretty lucrative.
Hilton Reserve Two Free Nights

Offer Details:

Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card

Even after the introduction of the Chase Sapphire Reserve, the Chase Sapphire Preferred is still a fantastic choice if you want to avoid the Reserve’s $450 annual fee, earn 2x on all travel & dining and earn a 50,000 point sign up bonus.

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More Things to Know
  • Earn 50,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $625 toward travel when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®
  • Named Best Credit Card for Flexible Travel Redemption - Kiplinger's Personal Finance, July 2016
  • 2X points on travel and dining at restaurants worldwide & 1 point per dollar spent on all other purchases.
  • Earn 5,000 bonus points after you add the first authorized user and make a purchase in the first 3 months from account opening
  • No foreign transaction fees
  • 1:1 point transfer to leading airline and hotel loyalty programs
  • Get 25% more value when you redeem for airfare, hotels, car rentals and cruises through Chase Ultimate Rewards. For example, 50,000 points are worth $625 toward travel
  • No blackout dates or travel restrictions - as long as there's a seat on the flight, you can book it through Chase Ultimate Rewards
Intro APR on Purchases
N/A
Regular APR
16.49% - 23.49% Variable
Annual Fee
Introductory Annual Fee of $0 the first year, then $95
Balance Transfer Fee
5.00%
Recommended Credit
Excellent Credit
Considering you can use these free nights at properties that charge 95,000 HHonors points per night and you get another free night every year you spend $10,000 on the card (another 95,000 point payday) this is one of the most lucrative hotel cards on the market- especially for those who like to stay at high-end, aspirational properties.
Other Key Benefits
Complimentary Hilton Gold
status (free breakfast) as long as you have the card open (no spend requirement)
Hilton Diamond status with $40,000 in spend per year
No foreign transaction fees Chip + Signature technology
Visa Signature perks (like luxury hotel program and travel protection)

Even though Hilton devalued their program massively last year, this card is a no-brainer for the two free weekend nights alone, plus this statement credit with a Hilton stay basically wipes out the $95 annual fee for the first year. It is still not even half-way through the year, so if you can swing $10,000 in spend, getting a $750+ in value from that free weekend night is not hard to do.  I don’t know how long the $100 statement credit will be around- my contacts have simply said this will be “limited time”. I’ll update as soon as I hear any concrete end-date news, but this is definitely the best offer I’ve ever seen on this card since it was launched in 2012.

Editorial Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Disclaimer: The responses below are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser’s responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.